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  • 51.
    Boremyr, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Reading Orwell’s Animals: An animal-oriented study of George Orwell’s political satire Animal Farm 2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 52.
    Botes, Elana
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    I Shall, We Shall, All the Others Will: Shall and Will in the Short-Stories of Doyle & Poe2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional prescriptive rules for shall and will state that with first person subjects shall should

    be used to express prediction and will to express volition, while with second and third person

    subjects will should be used to express prediction and shall to express volition. The aim of this

    study was to ascertain to what extent two 19th century authors, Scotsman Sir Arthur Conan

    Doyle and American Edgar Allen Poe, followed these traditional shall and will rules in their

    short stories. To this end a selection of short stories written by these authors were collected, and

    analysed with respect to usage of shall and will to express volition and prediction, and with

    respect to the frequency with which shall and will collocate with first, second and third person

    subjects. Results showed that shall as used by both Poe and Doyle favoured a first person

    subject and will a third person subject. Results also showed that Doyle followed the shall rules

    for first person shall about 50% of the time while Poe followed them about 60% of the time,

    and that Doyle followed the shall rules for third and second person shall about 60% of the time

    while Poe followed them about 55% of the time. Results further showed that Doyle followed

    the will rules for first person will about 40% of the time while Poe followed them about 30% of

    the time, and that Doyle followed the will rules for third and second person will about 70% of

    the time while Poe followed them about 80% of the time. It was concluded that neither Poe nor

    Doyle followed the rules very strictly, that first, second and third person shall was used by both

    authors to express prediction and volition in almost equal proportions, and that first, second and

    third person will was mostly used to express prediction by both authors.

  • 53.
    Bouzoula, Athina
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Roland Barthes in Julian Barnes’ Flaubert’s Parrot 2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 54.
    Bseiso, Layla
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Harold Pinter: A Night Out: A Study in the Political Connotations And the Abuse of Power2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Harold Pinter’s A Night Out is a significant but rarely produced piece of drama. Therefore, there is very little criticism to support or contradict my argument. The reason why I chose to do my essay on this particular play is to open doors for academic research and to try and make it an equal to its sister plays. I will raise questions and topics to prove the play is worth the readers’ time and effort and that A Night Out is a sharp piece of political theatre. Although at first glance it is a simple enough story, a straightforward tale of the nasty consequences of motherly love when it is pushed to the limit, on deeper inspection, a more far reaching and complex analysis of the abuse of power can be observed. The play offers a variety of themes, including: interpersonal power struggles, failed attempts at communication, antagonistic relationships, the threat of impending or past violence, the struggle for survival or identity, domination and submission, politics, lies and verbal, physical, psychological and sexual abuse. The prevailing theme in the play is the abuse of power: powerful parties oppressing weaker ones, and the results of the oppressed party looking for a vent in someone even weaker than themselves.

  • 55.
    Bseiso, Layla
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Oscar Wilde’s “The Happy Prince”: The Hidden Messages and the Debate on the Target Audience2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Oscar Wilde’s fairytales have been read to children for more than a century. Nevertheless, since the time of their publication in 1888 and 1891, the target audience of The Happy Prince and Other Tales and A House of Pomegranates have been the concern of critics. Delving into the context behind the rich and colourful imagery, one can find implications of homosexuality, the Paterian aesthetic and religious connotations. According to Carol Tattersall, The Happy Prince and Other Tales successfully mislead the public that it is innocent of any intention to undermine established standards of living or writing. Tattersall’s argument is based on comparing the first collection to Wilde’s second, A House of Pomegranates, which was perceived as “offensive and immoral” (136). On the other hand, William Butler Yeats states in his introduction to The Complete Works of Oscar Wilde that overall the reviewers of The Happy Prince and Other Tales were hostile because of Wilde’s aesthetic views (ixxvi). But Yeats overlooks the fact that Wilde was very pleased and proud, dashing notes to friends and reviewers and signing copies to many people (Tattersall 129). In general, the reception of Wilde’s first collection was more positive than that of the second because it was milder and more subtle in its controversial themes.

  • 56.
    Burzynski, Jaroslaw
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Victims or Abusers?: Re-defining African-American patriarchy and masculinity in Alice Walker's The Color Purple 2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 57.
    Bådagård, Elsa
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Dialectal Speech in Literature and Translation: Bachelor Degree Thesis in English Linguistics2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay studies how dialectal speech is reflected in written literature and how this phenomenon functions in translation. With this purpose in mind, Styron's Sophie's Choice and Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn are analysed using samples of non-standard orthography which have been applied in order to reflect the dialect, or accent, of certain characters. In the same way, Lundgren's Swedish translation of Sophie's Choice and Ferres and Rolfe's Spanish version of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn are analysed. The method consists of linguistically analysing a few text samples from each novel, establishing how dialect is represented through non-standard orthography, and thereafter, comparing the same samples with their translation into another language in order to establish whether dialectal features are visible also in the translated novels.

    It is concluded that non-standard orthography is applied in the novels in order to represent each possible linguistic level, including pronunciation, morphosyntax, and vocabulary. Furthermore, it is concluded that while Lundgren's translation intends to orthographically represent dialectal speech on most occasions where the original does so, Ferres and Rolfe's translation pays no attention to dialectology. The discussion following the data analysis establishes some possible reasons for the exclusion of dialectal features in the Spanish translation considered here. Finally, the reason for which this study contributes to the study of dialectology is declared.

  • 58.
    Case, Megan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Idiolect Change in Native English Speakers Living in Sweden2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
  • 59.
    Chalkiadaki, Marianna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Oppression, Silence, Reaction: A Psychoanalytical Reading of Paula Spencer in Roddy Doyle’s The Woman Who Walked Into Doors 2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 60.
    Chen, Yongjiang
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    From alienation to connection: the theme of alienation analyzed from a socialist feminist perspective in Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 61.
    Clark, Camilla
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    The No.1 Ladies´ Detective Agency: Sexist opinions as part of an appealing character2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
  • 62.
    Clausen, Marianne
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Disrupting Female Stereotypes: The Feminine Difference and the Challenge of Patriarchal Norms in Margaret Atwood’s Cat’s Eye 2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 63.
    Cook, Derek
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    A Galaxy Brought Down to Earth: An Ecocritical Reading of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 64.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Att arbeta medvetet med ordförrådet2017Other (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English. Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Children's Vocabulary Development: The role of parental input, vocabulary composition and early communicative skills2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to examine the early vocabulary development of a sample of Swedish children in relation to parental input and early communicative skills. Three studies are situated in an overall description of early language development in children. The data analyzed in the thesis was collected within a larger project at Stockholm University (SPRINT- “Effects of enhanced parental input on young children’s vocabulary development and subsequent literacy development” [VR 2008-5094]).

    Data analysis was based on parental report via SECDI, the Swedish version of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories, and audio recordings. One study examined parental verbal interaction characteristics in three groups of children with varying vocabulary size at 18 months. The stability of vocabulary development at 18 and 24 months was investigated in a larger study, with focus on children’s vocabulary composition and grammatical abilities. The third study examined interrelations among early gestures, receptive and productive vocabulary, and grammar measured with M3L, i.e. three longest utterances, from 12 to 30 months.

    Overall results of the thesis highlight the importance of early language development. Variability in different characteristics in parental input is associated with variability in child vocabulary size. Children with large early vocabularies exhibit the most stability in vocabulary composition and the earliest grammatical development. Children’s vocabulary composition may reflect individual stylistic variation. Use of early gestures is associated differentially with receptive and productive vocabulary.

    Results of the thesis have implications for parents, child- and healthcare personnel, as well as researchers and educational practitioners. The results underscore the importance of high quality in adult-child interaction, with rich input fine-tuned to children’s developmental levels and age, together with high awareness of early language development.

  • 66.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Early Communicative Gestures and Vocabulary Knowledge2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This poster presents work on the relationships between early communicative gestures and vocabulary knowledge in Swedish children aged 12 to 18 months. The role of gestures in early communicative development was studied using vocabulary measurements collected with the Swedish versions of the MacArthur-Bates CDI infant and toddler forms. In a larger study, correlations were calculated among communicative skills over 6-month intervals from child age 1;0 to 2;6 in a sample with varying numbers of children at different ages. The poster presents results from the first pairwise comparison using cross-sectional and cross-lagged correlations. Variables included gestures, receptive and productive vocabulary at 1;0, and productive vocabulary and the syntactic/grammatical measure M3L at 1;6 (n = 321). Gestures at 1;0 were more strongly correlated with receptive than productive vocabulary at the same age, and weakly correlated with productive vocabulary at 1;6. Additional analysis divided the gesture scale into “empty-hand” gestures and “object actions”, following Sansavini et al. (2010). Empty-hand gestures were found to be more related to productive vocabulary, while object-actions were more related to reception. Despite differences in methodology, results of the present study confirm some findings by Sansavini et al. Further analysis of the Swedish data showed that empty-hand gestures were significantly, but weakly, correlated with the percentage of nouns in children’s vocabularies at 1;6, whereas children’s use of object-actions were similarly correlated with the percentage of verbs. Results of this analysis may indicate that empty-hand gestures, which most often are deictic gestures, help infants enhance their knowledge of objects and their names, while activities with objects help them understand the concepts related to actions, particularly verbs. Such knowledge has implications for both parents and other caregivers who are invested in stimulating the language development of young children.

  • 67.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    I Feel Like a Complete Idiot! Starting a PhD Program in a New Field2017In: The Nordic PhD: Surviving and Succeeding / [ed] Christopher McMaster, Caterina Murphy and Jakob Rosenkrantz de Lasson, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 68.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Ordförråd och ordkunskap – språkets byggstenar2016In: Läsundervisningens grunder / [ed] Tarja Alatalo, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Ordförråd och ordkunskap: Språkets byggstenar2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kunskap om ord och deras betydelser är inte bara en förutsättning för en god läsutveckling utan också för hur barn ska klara sig i livet. Studier har visat att olikheter i den tidiga språkutvecklingsmiljön kan leda till slående skillnader i barns ordförråd redan i förskoleåldern. Dessa olikheter bereder stora utmaningar för dagens lärare och andra som arbetar med barn. Kännedom om hur ordinlärning stimuleras i hemmet och i förskolan kan bidra till att utjämna dessa skillnader.

  • 70.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English. Stockholm University, Department of Special Education.
    Vocabulary Composition in Swedish Children aged 18-24 months2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    von Rosen, Tatjana
    Stockholms universitet.
    Early Communicative Development in Swedish Children aged 12 to 30 months2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on child language acquisition confirms the importance of early language development for later language and literacy skills (Dickinson, Golinkoff & Hirsh-Pasek, 2010; Lee, 2011), and documents great individual variability in children’s acquisition rates (Fenson et al., 1994). Recent research has also widened the focus to include the impact of early gestures (e.g. Rowe & Goldin-Meadow, 2009). This study aims to investigate early communicative development in a sample of Swedish children based on parental report, using Swedish versions of the MacArthur-Bates CDI (Berglund & Eriksson, 2000; Eriksson & Berglund, 1999). In particular, variables such as early communicative gestures, receptive and productive vocabulary, and the syntactic/grammatical measure M3L (the Mean Length of Utterance score of the three longest utterances parents have heard their child say) are explored. The specific target group here is a subsample (from a total sample of 348) consisting of 128 children with complete records collected at six-month intervals (12, 18, 24 and 30 months of age). In the analysis, gender and children’s ability to use the pointing gesture at 12 months are used as grouping variables.

    The analysis entails first looking at general trends in the data, and thereafter examining individual trajectories, especially extreme ones. Growth curve modelling is employed to describe trajectories of productive vocabulary development, first with gender as the grouping variable, and secondly, with the pointing gesture at 12 months of age. Since preliminary results show different variation in the response between boys and girls, different covariance structures are used for modelling. Moreover, banded covariance structure is utilized to take into account strong correlations between neighboring time points (12-18, 18-24, and 24-30 months). Testing fixed effects reveals highly significantly different slopes for girls and boys. The banded covariance structure is also used in the analysis of productive vocabulary with pointing as the grouping variable. Taking into account heterogeneity in the two groups, results also indicate highly significant differences in vocabulary growth for pointers vs. non-pointers. However, separate analysis of the two groups is needed before further conclusions can be made. It must also be stressed that the data comes from parental report, and observational knowledge of both parental and child gestures is lacking. However, the results of this study definitely contribute to the international body of knowledge with data from the Swedish context. Furthermore, results regarding early communication are of interest for parents, child- and healthcare personnel, as well as educational practitioners.

  • 72.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    von Rosen, Tatjana
    Stockholm University.
    Vocabulary, Grammar and Early Gestures in Swedish Children aged 12-30 months2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on child language acquisition confirms the importance of early language development for later language and literacy skills, and documents great individual variability in children’s acquisition rates. This study aims to investigate early communicative development in a sample of Swedish children based on parental report, using Swedish versions of the MacArthur-Bates CDI. In particular, variables such as early communicative gestures, receptive and productive vocabulary, and grammatical development are explored. The study is a reanalysis of previously collected data (Cox Eriksson, 2014), using a subsample of 128 children with complete records for measures collected at six-month intervals (12, 18, 24 and 30 months of age). The analysis examines both general trends through growth curve modelling in addition to some individual trajectories. Results indicate gender differences in vocabulary profiles, and although there is no main effect of gender, girls exhibit a significantly higher rate of growth. Individual vocabulary trajectories for boys exhibit more variation than those of girls. There is also a significant effect on vocabulary size for use of the pointing gesture at 12 months. Regarding grammatical development, trajectories for girls and boys exhibit differences in variation as well as individual outliers.

  • 73.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Acoustic Variability in the Production of English Vowels by Native and Non-Native Speakers2008In: Issues in Accents of English / [ed] Waniek-Klimczak, Ewa, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing , 2008, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The features of non-native speech which distinguish it from native speech are often difficult to pin down. It is possible to be a native speaker of any of a vast number of varieties of English. These varieties each have their phonetic characteristics which allow them to be identified by speakers of the varieties in question and by others. The phonetic differences between the accents represented by these varieties are very great. It is impossible to indicate any particular configuration of vowels in the acoustic vowel space or set of consonant articulations which all native-speaker varieties of English have in common and which non-native speakers do not share. This study considers the vowel quality in a single word by native and non-native speakers.

  • 74.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Describing Swedish-accented English2006In: FONETIK 06, Lund, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Does English-medium schooling affect the Swedish spoken by Swedish students?2005In: Forskningsdagen vid Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The proposed presentation is a progress report from a project which is aimed at establishing some phonetic correlates of language dominance in various kinds of bilingual situations. The current object of study is Swedish students starting in classes which prepare for the International Baccalaureate (IB) programme. The IB classes in Sweden are taught in English, except for classes in Swedish and foreign languages. This means that the students are exposed to and speak a good deal more English than previously. The assumption that students will, on the one hand not “damage” their Swedish, and on the other will improve their English simply by attending an English-medium school will be tested. The linguistic background of the students studied will be established. Their English and Swedish proficiency will be tested according to various parameters (vowel quality, the timing of vowels and consonants in VC sequences, vocabulary mobilisation, perceived foreign accent) on arrival at the school, and again after one and three years at the school. The initial recordings have now been made and preliminary results will be reported

  • 76.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Language Dominance in Early and Late Bilinguals2004In: ASLA, Södertörn, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proposed presentation is a progress report from a project which is aimed at establishing some phonetic correlates of language dominance in various kinds of bilingual situations. The current object of study is Swedish students starting in classes which prepare for the International Baccalaureate (IB) programme. The IB classes in Sweden are taught in English, except for classes in Swedish and foreign languages. This means that after they enter the programme the students are exposed to and speak a good deal more English than previously. The assumption made by many students that they will, on the one hand not “damage” their Swedish, and on the other will dramatically improve their English simply by attending an English-medium school will be tested. The linguistic background of the students studied and their reasons for choosing the IB programme will be established. Their English and Swedish proficiency will be tested according to various parameters (native-like syntax, perceived foreign accent, the timing of vowels and consonants in VC sequences, vocabulary mobilisation) on arrival at the school, and again after one and three years at the school. The initial recordings are now underway. In a preliminary study involving just three young people who were bilingual in Swedish and English, the timing of the pronunciation of (C)VC syllables in Swedish and English was studied. The results of this investigation indicate that it may be possible to establish language dominance in bilingual speakers using timing data. It was found that the three subjects differed systematically in their pronunciation of the target words. One subject (15 years old), who was apparently native-like in both languages, had the V-C timing of both Swedish and English words of a native speaker of English. His brother (17 years old), who had a noticeable Swedish accent in English, pronounced both Swedish and English words in this respect like a native speaker of Swedish. The boys’ sister (9 years old) apparently had native-like timing in both languages.

  • 77.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Language dominance in early and late bilinguals2005In: Högre seminarium i språkvetenskap vid Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Linguistic and cultural consequences of the position of English in Sweden2005In: Heritage island in the ocean of culture = Ostrov nasledija v okeane kultur : Proceedings of the International Seminar on Intercultural Communication = Materialyi Meshdunarodnoj Konferentsii Po Voprosam Mezjdukulturnoj Kommunikatsii, Arkhangelsk, 2005, p. 89-97Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Mobile podcasting as a tool for learning English pronunciation in Vietnam2010In: IADIS Mobile Learning 2010 International Conference, Porto, Portugal, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a study of pronunciation learning using loaned MP3-players set in a college of business and tourism in Hanoi. Material was developed to help raise student awareness of a number of pronunciation features in English that are generally problematic for speakers of Vietnamese, such as vowel length and quality, and final consonants. This material was delivered to one group of 50 students as 9 pre-recorded audio lessons on the MP3-players. Another group of 61 students were given 8 traditional classroom lessons. Both groups were recorded before and after the study to establish whether their pronunciation improved on the particular features being taught.

  • 80.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Models and Targets for English Pronunciation in Vietnam and Sweden2009In: Research in Language, ISSN 2083-4616, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 113-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to account for the factors that lie behind the choice of models and targets for the pronunciation of English by learners of English in Vietnam and in Sweden. English is the first foreign language in both Vietnam and in Sweden. English is used as a language of international communication in both settings. Swedish learners have much more exposure to spoken English than do Vietnamese learners and the Swedish language is more similar to English than is Vietnamese. These reasons, among others, explain why Swedish accents of English are typically considerably more intelligible than Vietnamese accents of English. Given that the majority of English speakers in the world are not native speakers, it is argued that the traditional learner target of approaching native speaker pronunciations is not appropriate for either group, but especially not for the Vietnamese learners. Instead maximal international intelligibility is a more useful target. To this end, learners need to be exposed to a variety of native and non-native models.

  • 81.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Models and targets for the pronunciation of English in Sweden2008In: II International Conference on Native and Non-native Accents of English (Accents 2008), Lodz, Poland, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Phonetic correlates of unintelligibility in Vietnamese-accented English2009In: FONETIK 09, Stockholm, Sweden, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Vietnamese speakers of English are often able to communicate much more efficiently in writing than in speaking. Many have quite high proficiency levels, with full command of ad-vanced vocabulary and complex syntax, yet they have great difficulty making themselves understood when speaking English to both na-tive and non-native speakers. This paper ex-plores the phonetic events associated with breakdowns in intelligibility, and looks at com-pensatory mechanisms which are used.

  • 83.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Phonological Dominance In A Bilingual Class-Setting2005In: Colloquium On The Measurement Of Bilingual Proficiency Across Two, Barcelona, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proposed presentation is a progress report from a project, which is aimed at establishing some phonetic correlates of language dominance in various kinds of bilingual situations. The current object of study is Swedish students starting in classes, which prepare for the International Baccalaureate (IB) programme. The IB classes in Sweden are taught in English, except for classes in Swedish and foreign languages. The programme can be regarded as a type of immersion teaching and the students are exposed to and speak a good deal more English then previously. The assumption that students will, on the one hand not “damage” their Swedish, and on the other will improve their English simply by attending an English-medium school will be tested. The linguistic background of the students studied will be established. Their English and Swedish proficiency will be tested according to various parameters (vowel quality, the timing of vowels and consonants in VC sequences, vocabulary mo! bilisation, perceived foreign accent) on arrival at the school, and again after one and three years at the school. The initial recordings are now underway. In a preliminary study involving just three young people who were simultaneously bilingual in Swedish and English, the timing of children\'s pronunciation of (C)VC syllables in Swedish and English was studied. The results of this investigation indicate that it may be possible to establish language dominance in bilingual speakers using timing data. It was found that the three subjects differed systematically in their pronunciation of the target words. One subject (15 years old), who is apparently native-like in both languages, had the V-C timing of both Swedish and English words of a native speaker of English. His brother (17 years old), who has a noticeable Swedish accent in English, pronounced both Swedish and English words in this respect like a native speaker of Swedish. The boys’ sister (9 years old) apparently has native-like timing in both languages. Reference: Cunningham-Andersson, U. 2003 Temporal indicators of language dominance in bilingual children. In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2003, Phonum 9, 77-80, Umeå University

  • 84.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Quality, quantity and intelligibility of vowels in Vietnamese-accented English2008In: II International Conference on Native and Non-native Accents of English (Accents 2008), Lodz, Poland, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Quality, Quantity and Intelligibility of Vowels in Vietnamese-accented English2010In: Issues in Accents in English 2: Variability and Norm / [ed] Waniek-Klimczak, Ewa, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publications , 2010, p. 3-22Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Response to Peter Siemund’s paper “Independent Developments in the Genesis of Irish English”2004In: Celtic Englishes IV, Potsdam, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Temporal indicators of dominance in bilingual children2003In: PHONUM 9, Umeå, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Temporal indicators of language dominance in bilingual children2003In: Fonetik 2003, Umeå University, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of bilingualism it is of particular interest to stablish which, if any, of a speaker’s languages is dominant. Earlier research has shown that immigrants who acquire a new language tend to use elements of the timing patterns of the new language in their native language. It is shown here that measurements of timing in the two languages spoken by bilingual children can give information about the relative dominance of the languages for the individual speaker.

  • 89.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    The Role of Memory in Political Discourse in Northern Ireland2005In: European Federation of Associations and Centres for Irish Studies (EFACIS) Fifth Conference, University of Gothenburg, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Using African English in an International academic setting2009In: Mapping Africa in the English-speaking World, Gabarone, Botswana, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Vowel duration in a rural variety of Northern Irish English2008In: Urban and Rural Landscapes: Language, Literature and Culture in Modern Ireland, Falun, Sweden, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Vowel Quality and Quantity in the English Spoken in Rural Southwest Tyrone2008In: NIS: Nordic Irish Studies, ISSN 1602-124X, E-ISSN 2002-4517, Vol. 7, p. 41-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to describe some of the phonetic variation and characteristics associated with the pronunciation of Northern Ireland English (NIE) in general and the English of rural southwest Tyrone (ERST) in particular. Vowel quality, i.e. the precise sound of the vowels used, expressed in acoustic terms, and vowel quantity, i.e. how long vowels are relative to each other and to surrounding consonants, are of central interest here. ERST vowels may be relatively short or relatively long, depending on factors that are not phonologically relevant in other varieties of English. Vowel shifts from Middle English are only partly carried through, leading to variation according to context and register. Exactly which or a number of possible vowel qualities a speaker chooses to use in a given situation can have sociophonetic significance. Some sounds are clearly stigmatized and can be selectively used or avoided by speakers to achieve desired effects.

  • 93.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Vowels in rural southwest Tyrone2008In: Fonetik 2008 / [ed] Eriksson, Anders; Lindh, Jonas, Göteborg, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to pin down some of the pho-netic variation and oddities associated with Northern Ireland English (NIE) in general and the English of rural southwest Tyrone (ERST) in particular, Vowel quality and vowel quantity relationships are crucial here. ERST may have short or long vowels, depending on factors that are not phonologically interesting in other varieties of English. Vowel shifts from Middle English are only partly carried through, lead-ing to sociophonetic variation.

  • 94.
    Cunningham, Una
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Andersson, S
    Growing up with Two Languages2004Book (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Cunningham, Una
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Holmsten, Elin
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    “Can you hear me, Hanoi?”: compensatory mechanisms employed in synchronous net-based English language learning2010In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 161-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the intelligibility difficulties experienced by students of English for academic purposes at a university in Sweden while taking part in synchronous net-based seminars. Connectivity limitations, microphone and headphone problems, background noise and other factors in combination with limited skill in the perception of English speech make it difficult for these students to process speech directed to them. In addition, the speech the students are trying to process may be produced by nonnative speakers of English, either fellow students or teachers. A comparison of simultaneous communication in several of the modes available in the virtual seminar environment showed that students make use of a number of strategies to partly compensate for their failure to optimally perceive and produce speech.

  • 96.
    Dal Cero, Luca
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Hur eller Varför?: Kunskap i sociokulturellt eller existentialistiskt perspektiv? En kritisk betraktelse2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    This essay set out to propose a problematic interpretation of the socio-cultural perspective on learning. Its purpose is to show how the socio-cultural perspective on learning defines the concept of knowledge in an incomplete way. The aim becomes then that of giving a more comprehensive description of this concept, and, to this end, to construct a new, broader pedagogic discourse. The investigation starts with a deconstructive analysis of Roger Säljö’s socio-cultural text in order to point out the incompleteness of the concept of knowledge. The constructive part of the analysis proceeds using Heidegger’s and Sartre’s philosophical theories which take a general approach on human learning and on human knowledge as dependent on intuition. A dichotomy of two new concepts related to knowledge is thus defined: how-knowledge and why-knowledge. This reconceptualisation of the concept of knowledge allows a reinterpretation of any act of knowledge in a structural way. Hence any act of knowledge includes a moment (a) which defines the initial contextual (conceptual or practical) situation; a moment (b) which represents an algorithm, a procedure, or a theory; and a moment (c) which represents the result of the act, and is the direct application of knowledge as a finalized entity. Knowledge inbuilt in (a) and (c) is characterized as how-knowledge, while that in (b) is characterized as why-knowledge. In a learning situation a focus on how-knowledge implies finality and objectification of students. Conversely, why-knowledge implies students becoming subjects of their own learning.

  • 97.
    Dodou, Katherina
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    America after 9/11: Ethnic Diversity and Patriotism in John Updike’s Terrorist2013In: Transcultural Identities in Contemporary Literature / [ed] Irene Gilsenan Nordin, Julie Hansen and Carmen Zamorano Llena, Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2013, p. 177-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Dodou, Katherina
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    American Malady: 9/11, Disease, and the Experience of Terrorism in Don DeLillo's Falling Man2014In: The Health of the Nation: European Views of the United States / [ed] Meldan Tanrisal & Tanfer Emin Tunc, Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter, 2014, p. 207-217Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Dodou, Katherina
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English. Humtank.
    Att lära sig tänka humanistiskt2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 100.
    Dodou, Katherina
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Childhood Without Children: Ian McEwan and the Critical Study of the Child2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has a twofold ambition. First, it offers a new perspective on Ian McEwan’s works by focusing on his treatment of childhood. Second, by using McEwan’s writing as an example, it seeks to challenge the current critical preoccupation with childhood in the novel in terms solely of child characters. The dissertation argues that it is more productive to understand childhood as an entity distinct from children. Focusing on figurative uses of the child in fiction, it considers the significance of childhood in works that do not treat child characters. It shows that the inclusion of images and metaphors of childhood has significant thematic and formal implications for the overall meanings of literary artefacts. The thesis draws on recent scholarship in sociology and cultural studies which views images of children as documenting societal assumptions. The dissertation employs this approach to the child figure in culture to account for the use of childhood imagery in McEwan's novels. The discussion is comprised of two parts. Part one provides a critical and historical background to the field of childhood studies, the portrayal of childhood in the British novel and McEwan criticism. Part two begins by analysing the representation of a child in Atonement, then continues with the thematisation of childhood in the absence of children in The Child in Time, and then considers the figurative employment of childhood images in The Innocent and Saturday. The dissertation demonstrates that perceptions of childhood are key to McEwan’s critique of post-war British culture and notions of national identity, history, citizenship and civic disorder. More importantly, the dissertation offers a new paradigm for the critical examination of childhood in the novel – one which sheds light on the metaphorical uses of childhood. Ultimately, the thesis illuminates childhood’s capacity to define as well as to disseminate societal values.

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