Dalarna University's logo and link to the university's website

du.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 51 - 87 of 87
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Enhancing Intercultural Communication in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language: An Action Research Study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancing Intercultural Communication in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language – An Action Research Study

    Over the past few decades, the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization worldwide have required a shift in the focus of Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) towards competence in intercultural communication in which the role of culture in the acquisition of CFL and in the pragmatic use of the language is emphasized and promoted. However, most of the current research in this academic area remains only on a theoretical level. Practical examples, particularly with regard to distance learning/teaching of the Chinese language, are very limited.

    This motivated the implementation of an action research study which aimed at exploring the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and applying intercultural communication theory into a contemporary distance CFL course for beginners. By observing and comparing the performance of subjects in the control and experimental groups, this action research study focuses on exploring three basic areas. Firstly, it discloses the cultural elements which underlie effective daily communication. Secondly, it investigates how students acquire cultural knowledge and develop their ability to competently communicate in the target course. And thirdly, it evaluates how the modified course syllabus could enhance students’ intercultural communicative competence. The findings of the research aim to serve as both a resource and reference for educators and researchers who are interested in carrying out reforms and research in this academic domain.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 52.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Enhancing Intercultural Communicative Competence in Chinese L2 Education – An Action Research2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 21st Century, Chinese L2 is facing new challenges caused by the rapid development of information communication technology and internationalization. In this changing global context, how Chinese L2 learners effectively perform intercultural communication has become a crucial element in this education. While it is agreed that intercultural communication competence should be included in the present Chinese L2 education, practical research, such as how to integrate cultural elements into an existing course’s syllabus, remains an open field for scholars and teachers to explore.

    This action research endeavors to fill this research gap by exploring the scope of possibilities and limitations in implementing intercultural communication theory into an Internet-based Chinese L2 course for beginners at the university level and by investigating how it could enhance learners’ intercultural communication competence. The research applies a modified framework for communicative competence of second language education which is originally proposed by Usó-Juan and Martinez-Flor’s (2006). The theory suggests that when enhancing the learners’ intercultural communication competence in a foreign language education, it will gradually enhance the learners’ overall performance in linguistic, pragmatic and strategic competence.

    Action research seems to be well suited methodology in this study since it allows the researcher (who is also the teacher of the target course) to gather evaluative and reflective data from a direct/insider’s experience. In order to minimize the risk of subjectivity in the action research, this research also applies traditional research methodology, such as distributing and analyzing questionnaires, documentary data collections, in-depth interview, etc.

    The first research session of this research was designed to investigate the control groups in 2013 in which the researcher observed how students learned in the target course in its original settings. The data of the control group was then be used as a reference for the experimental groups in 2014 when the students were taught by modified teaching materials in which intercultural communication were highlighted.

    This paper will focus on presenting the findings of the first session of this research: (1) what the cultural elements explicitly and implicitly integrated into this language course are, and (2) how these cultural elements affect students’ intercultural communication in different social scenarios, such as introducing themselves and presenting other people, making phone calls, responding to compliments, etc. The findings are a valuable reference and a stepping-stone towards the second session of this action research in 2014. 

  • 53.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Flipping the Classroom – Integrating Intercultural Communication Competence into a Chinese Foreign Language Course2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of information communicative technology today not only accelerates the pace of internationalization and globalization but also shape the modes of human communication. Facing this overwhelming challenge, the cross-cultural and societal aspects of pragmatics, intercultural communication competence has especially become one of the main focuses in second/foreign language education worldwide.

    Responding to this challenge, the latest issued official documents for Chinese as a second/foreign language education in China propose a renewed syllabus, emphasizing the importance of culture as an integral element in effective communication. However, how to integrate intercultural communication theories into present foreign language courses remains mostly on a theoretical level. Very few practical or empirical studies have been done in this academic arena.

    This motivated the implementation of an action research in 2013 which aims to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and intercultural communication theory into a present Chinese foreign language course for beginners. The research utilizes an interactive online learning platform to deliver a series of online tasks - “flipping the classroom” – to explicitly demonstrate how cultural differences affect the language used by Chinese, English and Swedish speakers. Through case studies and other brainstorming activities, the tasks gradually enhance the students’ awareness of cross-cultural differences in varying social situations.

    This paper will present the findings of this action research, in particular, the design and implementation of the online tasks for “flipping the classroom”, such as: 1) the characteristics of this interactive online tool, “flipping the classroom”; 2) the cultural elements and intercultural communication theory included in the online tasks; 3) the specific tasks integrated into the enhanced course; 4) student response to the tasks and 5) the effectiveness of these tasks in developing students’ intercultural communication competence. 

  • 54.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Intercultural Communicative Competence in Teaching and Learning Chinese as a Foreign Language2014In: CLTA-GNY 2014 Annual Conference 12th New York International Conference on Teaching Chinese: May 3-4, 2014, New York University and Nanjing University, NY, USA: 2014 Annual Conference Program, New York, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, our world has experienced enormous changes due to the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization. In response to these changes, intercultural communication has become the central focus of foreign language education in the West in which the pragmatic use of the foreign language is emphasized and promoted.

    Following these trends, the intercultural communication perspective has drawn the attention of Chinese scholars and gradually became one of the controversial issues in the teaching of Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL). During the debate, a consensus has now been reached that intercultural communication should be a key feature of CFL education and “culture and communication” is placed as one of the main modules in CFL teachers’ education. However, most of the present research in this area is still remains only on the theoretical level. The practical implementation of the intercultural communication perspective remains an open field for scholars and teachers to explore.

    In order to explore practical ways of implementing intercultural communication theory in CFL education, this paper investigates four questions: (1) What does “intercultural communication” mean in the teaching of CFL? (2) What are the elements of culture in the Chinese language? (3) How can the framework of intercultural communicative competence be implemented into present-day education of CFL? (4) How can the effectiveness of applying intercultural communicative competence theory in CFL be measured?

    In order to provide answers to these questions, the paper presents an action research designed to revise an existing CFL course for beginners and aims to investigate the scope of possibilities and the limitations in implementing the intercultural communication approach in the CFL teaching and learning. The paper also presents a pilot study serving as a valuable reference and a stepping-stone towards more comprehensive research.

  • 55.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Role of Culture in the Acquisition of CSL – From the Perspective of Intercultural Communication Competence2015In: The 21st International Conference of the International Association for Intercultural Communication Studies (IAICS) cum The 11th Biennual International Conference of the China Association for Intercultural Communication (CAFIC): Culture, Communication, and Hybridity in an Age of Globalization, Hong Kong, 2015, p. 130-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, the demands for coping with the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization worldwide have shifted the focus of Chinese as a second language (CSL) towards intercultural communication competence in which the role of culture in the acquisition of CSL and in the pragmatic use of the language is emphasized and promoted. However, most of the present research in this academic area still remains only on a theoretical level.

     

    In order to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and implementing intercultural communication theory into CSL education, an action research has been conducted since the beginning of 2013 to review an actual course for beginners. This paper will present the findings of the research: 1) By applying the theoretical framework of intercultural communicative competence, the findings indicated that the existing CSL course provided limited information explaining the cultural elements that are reflected in the Chinese language. 2) The findings also suggested that the cultural skills acquired in the students’ first language do influence their acquisition of CSL. This is demonstrated in the students’ written tasks such as introducing themselves and presenting other people, etc. The findings can be examples and resources for further research in this academic field.     

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 56.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Role of Culture in the Acquisition of CSL – From the Perspective of Intercultural Communication Competence2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, the demands for coping with the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization worldwide have shifted the focus of Chinese as a second language (CSL) towards intercultural communication competence in which the role of culture in the acquisition of CSL and in the pragmatic use of the language is emphasized and promoted. This standpoint is highlighted explicitly in the recently issued official documents of CSL education in China, 2008.

    However, most of the present research in this academic area still remains only on a theoretical level. Additional practical research related to how culture affects the acquisition of CSL; how culture should be integrated into present CSL courses, as well as how intercultural communication theories should be implemented in this education, remain an open field for scholars and teachers to explore.

    In order to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and implementing intercultural communication theory into CSL education, an action research has been conducted since the beginning of 2013 to review an actual course for beginners. The first phase of the research focuses on: (1) what the cultural elements explicitly and implicitly integrated into this language course are, and (2) how these cultural elements affect students’ acquisition of CSL.

    This paper will present the findings of the data collection from 2013. By applying the theoretical framework of intercultural communicative competence, the findings indicated that the existing CSL course provided limited information explaining the cultural elements that are reflected in the Chinese language. The findings also suggested that the cultural skills acquired in the students’ first language do influence their acquisition of CSL. This is demonstrated in the students’ written tasks such as introducing themselves and presenting other people, making phone calls, responding to compliments, etcBased on the findings of the first phrase, the second stage of the research aims to implement intercultural communicative theory in the existing CSL course and examines the effectiveness of such modification of the course.

  • 57.
    Korányi, Bence
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Analysis of the Influence of Chinese Cultural Values on the Meaning and Usage of New Chinese Internet Words2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Linguistic determinism has prompted one of the earliest discussions about the connection between language and thought. This link has been further refined through the identification of cultural values playing a determinative role on the basic stage of thought formation, which is one of the fundamental aspects of language ideology. Such findings have sparked the hypothesis that cultural influences, in the form of cultural values as measurable means, should be recognized in or connected to words, even to those that belong to previously uninvestigated areas, such as new Internet words. The methodology of qualitative content analysis as well as a quantitative study applied to a sample of new Chinese Internet words and expressions has demonstrated that the influence of Chinese cultural values on them is identifiable to a significant extent. The cultural values either directly affect the words in their original or new meaning or have an influence on the Internet words indirectly, in their usage. Furthermore, it is argued that such connections between the researched Chinese cultural values and the meaning or usage of the collected new Chinese Internet words and expressions are not only to be strictly categorized into direct and indirect influences but should be considered in a broader sense. Despite some words and expressions originating from other languages and cultures, the influence of Chinese cultural values should still be acknowledged since it is through these that words are able to integrate into the Chinese language.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 58.
    Kramolišová, Alice
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Similarity in collectivistic business values among family running business in China and in Italy2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the research was to find similarities in family business values between two countries with focus on collectivistic values. The research basis for the study was accordingly two different countries Chine and Italy with different historical, cultural and social background and values, which they applied in their family running business. According to the literature review we can see that China due to its cultural and historical heritage is described as the source of collectivistic values, what distinguishes this country from western countries (Lee, 1996). Contrarily, Italy belongs to western countries, which according to authors differentiate itself by its individualism. (Hofstede, 1995). However, other findings stated that also Italy is a source collectivistic values evidenced together with paternalism.   Following the existing findings, it was therefore deductively affirmed that collectivism must not be exclusively limited to Chinese but is also present in Italian family business management.  Accordingly with the research question of the thesis “Are there similar collectivistic business values among family running business within two fairly distinct nations, China and Italy? What are they?” this research confirmed the evidence of collectivistic values in both countries, nevertheless the analysis disclosed similarities and inequalities between them. The findings from the present study indicate collectivistic values: listening, selfdedication, teamwork and collaboration, which are characteristic for family business in China and Italy. Additionally we can observe a dynamic evolvement in patterns that tend to be more individualistic than collectivistic in case of China or contrarily are turning to be more collectivistic in case of Italy.

  • 59.
    Lindgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, French.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Malmsten, Solveig
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Charlotte Lindgren intervjuar Wei Hing Rosenkvist och Solveig Malmsten inför Grammatikdagen 2017 vid Högskolan Dalarna2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (mp3)
    Ljudfil
  • 60.
    Nordgren, Viktor
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Mandarin, the New Language Choice in Sweden: Investigating the Difficulties of Learning Mandarin inSwedish Secondary Schools2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The main theme of this essay is difficulties when learning Mandarin as a foreignlanguage in Sweden. Standardised Chinese, also called Mandarin Chinese will beintroduced as the new language choice in Swedish middle- and secondary schools.In order to investigate what difficulties Swedish pupils face when learning thislanguage, a questionnaire was sent to three Mandarin classes in Sweden. 36participants agreed to participate in the current study. The answers from thequestionnaire were compared to similar research, concerning British and Americanstudents of Mandarin. This essay finds that there are areas where research onBritish and American students point to the similar results as the current research.However, there are also areas where the results differ.

  • 61.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Children, Gender and Chinese Mother Tongue Education in Sweden2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chinese language education in Chinese societies is not only a language subject but also a kind of moral education influenced by Confucianism. As part of culture and social values, gender identity and division of labour have been shaped by the education for more then a millennium.

     

    Similar to Chinese language education in Chinese societies, Chinese mother tongue education in Sweden has inherited the Confucian tradition which aims at inculcating one’s morality. However, Chinese mother tongue education in Sweden has its unique geographic environment – a European country with significant historical and cultural differences compared with the Chinese society. The Chinese students, who are engaged in the education, are situated in a multicultural matrix where they have to negotiate between and/or to integrate their own culture with the Swedish during their socialization of gender. By investigating how the Chinese children respond to and deal with the teaching materials in Chinese mother tongue education in Sweden, this study tries to reveal the role of children in establishing their gender identity in a multicultural society.  

  • 62.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Flipping the Classroom – Integrating Intercultural Communication Competence into a Chinese Foreign Language Course2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of information communicative technology today not only accelerates the pace of internationalization and globalization but also shape the modes of human communication. Facing this overwhelming challenge, the cross-cultural and societal aspects of pragmatics, intercultural communication competence has especially become one of the main focuses in second/foreign language education worldwide. 

    Responding to this challenge, the latest issued official documents for Chinese as a second/foreign language education in China propose a renewed syllabus, emphasizing the importance of culture as an integral element in effective communication. However, how to integrate intercultural communication theories into present foreign language courses remains mostly on a theoretical level. Very few practical or empirical studies have been done in this academic arena.

    This motivated the implementation of an action research in which aims to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and intercultural communication theory into a present Chinese foreign language course for beginners. The research utilizes an interactive online learning platform to deliver a series of online tasks - “flipping the classroom” – to explicitly demonstrate how cultural differences affect the language used by Chinese, English and Swedish speakers. Through case studies and other brainstorming activities, the tasks gradually enhance the students’ awareness of cross-cultural differences in varying social situations.

    This paper will present the findings of this action research, in particular, the design and implementation of the online tasks for “flipping the classroom”, such as: 1) the characteristics of this interactive online tool, “flipping the classroom”; 2) the cultural elements and intercultural communication theory included in the online tasks; 3) the specific tasks integrated into the enhanced course; 4) student response to the tasks and 5) the effectiveness of these tasks in developing students’ intercultural communication competence.

    Key words: Chinese as a second language, culture, cultural pragmatics, intercultural communication, intercultural communicative competence, action research

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 63.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Intercultural Communication in Teaching Chinese2011In: LMS Lingua, ISSN 0023-6330, no 2, p. 46-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, our world has experienced enormous changes due to the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization. At the same time, intercultural communication has become the central focus of foreign language education in the West. Following this trend, intercultural communication in Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) has gradually drawn scholars’ attention in the East and became one of the controversial issues in the teaching of Chinese. In China, “culture and communication” were placed as one of the main modules in teachers’ education in 2007.  However, most of the present research in this area focuses on the theoretical level and debates concerning how intercultural communication theory should be implemented in teaching and learning CFL.  

  • 64.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Pros and cons of Chinese language distance courses2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because for some students in Sweden it is not possible to follow traditional university courses of Chinese as a second language, at our university we have developed several distance courses covering the whole first year of Chinese studies. In this paper I am focusing on pros and cons of distance courses of Chinese language compared to the traditional ones, both from the students' and teachers' point of view.

     

    While traditional courses have advantage in the fact that teacher can more easily create  supportive environment in the classroom, the interaction between the teacher and the students in distance courses is limited by the technology used (in our case: an e-conference software is used). A wide variety of teaching approaches can be used and both students and teachers get immediate and direct feedback. It is also less difficult to create good learning atmosphere.

     

    However, we have realized that distance courses are actually preferred by some students, who would have "mental blocks" in classroom environment. Moreover, distance courses lead to a higher motivation to prepare for the lessons due to smaller groups where everybody has to participate. In effect students either use the almost individual help provided by teachers and prepare regularly or simply drop out.

  • 65.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Teaching Intercultural Communication in Foreign Language Education through Video Conferencing2013In: LMS Lingua, ISSN 0023-6330, no 1, p. 20-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1980s, Western linguists and specialists on second language acquisition have emphasized the importance of enhancing students’ intercultural communication competence in foreign language education. At the same time, the demand for intercultural communicative competence increased along with the advances of communication technology with its increasingly global reach and the process of globalization itself.In the field of distance language education, these changes have resulted in a shift of focus from the production and distribution of learning materials towards communication and learning as a social process, facilitated by various internet-based platforms. The current focus on learners interacting and communicating synchronously trough videoconferencing is known as the fourth generation of distance language education.

    Despite the fact that teaching of Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) faces the same or even greater challenges as teaching other languages, the intercultural communication perspective is still quite a new trend in CFL and its implementation and evaluation are still under development. Moreover, the advocates of the new trends in CFL have so far focused almost exclusively on classroom-based courses, neglecting the distance mode of CFL and leaving it as an open field for others to explore.

    In this under-researched context, Dalarna University (Sweden), where I currently work, started to provide web-based courses of the Chinese language in 2007. Since 2010, the Chinese language courses have been available only in the distance form, using the same teaching materials as the previous campus-based courses. The textbooks used in both settings basically followed the functional nationalism approach. However, in order to catch up with the main trend of foreign-language education, we felt a need to implement the cross-cultural dimension into the distance courses as well. Therefore in 2010, a pilot study has been carried out to explore opportunities and challenges for implementing a cross-cultural perspective into existing courses and evaluating the effectiveness of this implementation based on the feedback of the students and on the experience of the teacher/researcher.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 66.
    Saied, Besha
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Make a man out of a monkey:  Psychosexual development of Sun Wukong2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Journey to the West is written by Wu Cheng'en,1505-1580 A.D., during the Ming Dynasty, 1368–1644 A.D. The protagonist in The Journey to the West is named Sun Wukong. Sun Wukong is born with supernatural powers and is always up to no good. As punishment for his crimes against the Heaven, Sun Wukong must take a journey to India to help the monk Tripitaka, in order to retrieve Buddhist scriptures back to China. Throughout the journey Sun Wukong and the pilgrims will go through eightyone calamities. The pilgrimage transforms Sun Wukong into becoming a better man. This paper applies Sigmund Freud’s psychosexual development to Sun Wukong to understand his actions and personality and why it changes for the better during The Journey to the West. Sun Wukong develops a fixation to always pleasure himself through eating in the early stages of his life. Later Sun Wukong finds his phallus, the Golden Rod, to conquer, imitating his first father figure, the Jade Emperor. The Jade Emperor tries to execute Sun Wukong for disobeying his laws, but fails. Therefore, Sun Wukong believes that strong people are above the law. The only one that is strong enough to punish him is Buddha by putting Sun Wukong under the FivePhase Mountain. After five hundred years under the mountain, Sun Wukong is assigned by Guanyin to protect Tripitaka during the pilgrimage. Sun Wukong finds a father figure in Tripitaka and a mother figure in Guanyin. Sun Wukong imitates Tripitaka’s kind nature by not using his phallus, the Golden Rod, to conquer. Instead Sun Wukong uses the Golden Rod to do good merits and not hurt humans.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 67.
    Song, William Wei
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Forsman, Anders
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Yan, Jia
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    An e-Curriculum Based Systematic Resource Integration Approach to Web-Based Education2014In: International Journal of Information and Education Technology, ISSN 2010-3689, ISSN 2010-3689, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 495-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rapid advancement of the web technology, more and more educational resources, including software applications for teaching/learning methods, are available across the web, which enables learners to access the learning materials and use various ways of learning at any time and any place. Researchers from both computer science and education are working together, collaboratively focusing on development of pedagogically enabling technologies which are believed to improve the infrastructure of education systems and processes, including curriculum development models, teaching/learning methods, management of educational resources, systematic organization of communication and dissemination of knowledge and skills required by and adapted to users. In this paper we address the following two aspects of systematic integration architecture of educational systems: 1) learning objects – a semantic description and organization of learning resources using the web service models and methods, and 2) learning services discovery and learning goals match for educational coordination and learning service planning.

  • 68.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm university.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    A regional survey of the relationship between vowel and consonant duration in Shetland Scots2015In: Folia linguistica, ISSN 0165-4004, E-ISSN 1614-7308, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 57-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The local dialect spoken in the Shetland Isles constitutes a form of Lowland Scots. It has been suggested that stressed syllables in Shetland Scots tend to contain either a long vowel followed by a short consonant (V:C) or a short vowel followed by a long consonant ( C:), and furthermore that this pattern constitutes a trace of complementary quantity in Norn, a Nordic language spoken in Shetland approximately until the end of the eighteenth century. The existence of such a pattern has also been supported by acoustic measurements. Following a summary and overview of Norn's demise in the Shetland Isles, this paper presents a regional survey of the relationship between vowel and consonant duration in stressed syllables in Shetland Scots. Based on acoustic data from 43 speakers, representing ten separate regions across the Shetland Isles, the inverse correlation between vowel and consonant duration is assessed. The results reveal that the inverse correlation is strongest in the northern part of Shetland and weakest in the south, and displays a general north-to-south decline across Shetland. The results are thus generally consistent with predictions that follow from regional variation concerning Norn's death; evidence suggests that it survived the longest in the northern parts of Shetland.

  • 69.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Pulmonic ingressive speech in English? Evidence from the Shetland Isles2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 70. Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Pulmonic ingressive speech in Orkney dialect2015In: Scottish Language, ISSN 0264-0198, Vol. 34, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Pulmonic ingressive speech in Orkney Scots2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Rhoticity in Yunnan English2016In: World Englishes, ISSN 0883-2919, E-ISSN 1467-971X, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 42-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of the pronunciation of English by speakers from Yunnan Province in Southwest China. Eight non-English major undergraduate students participated in three tasks: an informal interview, reading a text, and a dialectological-style questionnaire. The degree of rhoticity was assessed based on auditory analysis, with an inter-rater agreement of 97 per cent. The results revealed significant inter-speaker variation: two informants were virtually non-rhotic whereas the remaining six were rhotic to a considerable degree. Intra-speaker variation among these six was furthermore systematic: the degree of rhoticity was lowest in the interview, intermediate in reading, and highest in the questionnaire. These results are discussed with reference to several factors, including the level of formality and attention to speech triggered by the tasks, potentially emerging norms for rhoticity, and the stage of development of a local form of ‘Yunnan English’.

  • 73.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Rhoticity in Yunnan English: Stylistic and Phonological Conditioning2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Stylistic and phonological conditioning of rhoticity among Yunnan speakers of English2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Tracing syllable structure through time: Durational reflexes of complementary quantity in Shetland Scots2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Shetland Isles, the northernmost part of the British Isles, were colonized by Vikings from about 800 AD, and belonged to Norway and later Denmark until 1469, when they were ceded to Scotland. A Nordic language, first Old Norse and later Norn, constituted the dominant language for nearly 800 years, and native speakers of Norn could be found as late as the 18th or even early 19th century. While the modern Shetland dialect constitutes a form of Lowland Scots, the exact 78nature and extent of its Scandinavian trace features remain a topic of continuing inquiry. One of the most significant claims concerns its syllable structure. Catford (1957) suggested that stressed monosyllabic words contained either a long vowel followed by a short consonant, or a short vowel followed by a long consonant. This, in his view, constituted a trace of the complementary quantity that probably existed in Norn, and which is still found in Swedish and Norwegian: Sw. hat ‗hate‘ V:C vs. hatt ‗hat‘ VC:.This suggestion was previously examined on the basis of acoustic measurements (van Leyden 2002). The results indicated that the inverse correlation between vowel and consonant duration in Shetland Scots was weaker than in Norwegian but stronger than in mainland Scotland or the Orkney Isles, which are situated considerably closer to the Scottish mainland. A stronger correlation in Shetland than in Orkney is consistent with the timing of Norn‘s demise; it survived longer in Shetland.There is significant linguistic variation within the Shetland Isles (Mather & Speitel, 1986). This is partly attributable to the fact that they constitute an archipelago of over 100 islands, where interisland travel was at times limited. A recent regional survey of Shetland Scots therefore included an investigation of the relationship between vowel and consonant duration. 10 localities from the entire archipelago were included. In each locality 2 men and 2 women between the ages 55-75 were recorded, all of whom were born and had lived most of their lives in the locality in question. The present study focuses on the vowel system before /t/, as this context facilitates a comparison across regions, has revealed geographic variation previously (van Leyden 2002), and constitutes the primary context of Catford‘s original claim. Monosyllabic target words (feet, beat, bit, etc.) were produced (2 repetitions) by the informants in a carrier sentence. Vowel and consonant duration was measured, and the relation between the two was assessed on the basis of correlation measures.The results reveal a clear north-to-south cline in the strength of correlation within the Shetland archipelago: the pattern is strongest in the northern isles, decreases through the Shetland mainland, and becomes weakest in the southern part of the mainland and Fair Isle. This pattern is generally consistent with the timing of Norn‘s death; Norn is reported to have survived the longest in the northern parts. However alternative interpretations, involving more recent dialect leveling, are also discussed.

  • 76.
    Sääf, Ludvig
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    The influence of government policies on the Dongba Pictorial Script2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Dongba Pictorial Script (DPS) is a distinctive ethnical characteristic of the Naxi minority. It is commonly described as the world’s only living pictographic script. During the reform era (1978-present day) the DPS has undergone evolvement. Fears of its possible extinction have been raised. A literature review was used to evaluate the influence of new government policies on the DPS and to put forward possible future paths. Three stages that have had strong influence on the evolvement of the DPS were defined. The first stage concerns the enactment of policies for rediscovering of minority ethnicity, here resulting in a reconceptualization and domestication of the DPS. The second stage concerns enactments of policies promoting the introduction of financial interests that resulted in a commodification of the DPS. The third stage concerns the enactment of regulations stating a commitment of the government to protect DPS while evolving under political and financial interests. It was concluded that the DPS has been transformed from a sacred religious script into a consumable object. Disconnected from its religious foundation it has lost authenticity. A subsequent increased misuse could, if not counteracted, threaten the sound evolvement of the DPS. The present paper suggests that reconnecting the DPS’ development to the local Naxi community will facilitate a sustainable future for the script.

  • 77.
    Thomas, Jeffrey
    et al.
    Kansas City School of Law.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Dissents and dispositions2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Uddsten, Veronica
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Chinese Men and "Leftover Women": How do Chinese Men Position Themselves in Relation to the Concept of Labelling Women as "Leftover"?2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a resurgence of gender inequality in China. Today, women are pressured to get married by the state and their social surroundings, as they told if they remain unmarried and have the "three highs"; high age, education and salary, they will become leftovers on the marriage market. Previous research on the concept of labelling women as "leftover" has 4

    shown that labelling women as "leftover" can have several different negative impacts. In this thesis, both the theory of masculine hegemony and the theory of symbolic interaction have been used. The concept creates a hegemonic masculinity as it is a normative practice that promotes the subordination of women. However, as the concept is based on the notion that all Chinese men, or at least those of relevant social standing, would find the "three highs" undesirable, it is relevant to see how Chinese men in fact do position themselves in relation to the hegemonic masculinity on an individual level. In symbolic interaction, the concept of gender is created through social construction when people attach special meanings to the sex of a person, a process which is called "doing gender". Therefore symbolic interaction is used to see what special meaning Chinese men attach to women having the "three highs" and masculine hegemony to put their answers into a larger context. If it could be shown that Chinese men do not comply with the hegemonic masculinity, Chinese women would not have to feel obliged to adjust to the hegemonic masculinity and thereby making it easier for them to pursue higher education, high paying jobs and marrying at a later age. However, as this thesis is a qualitative study, and therefore a limited number of data subjects, the generalizability of the result should not be exaggerated. The interviews that were conducted for this thesis showed that the data subjects were familiar with the concept and that they considered it to be natural for there to be women China labelled as "leftover". Nevertheless, in relation to their own marital choices, the data subjects did not attach the negative meaning as set out by the hegemonic masculinity, a result which to some extent was confirmed by the data subjects’ experiences and other control questions. The result is interesting, and enforces Connell and MesserSchmidt’s theory, that even though a hegemonic masculinity is normative, not everyone has to comply with it. As the cornerstone of the concept is that Chinese men find women with the "three highs" undesirable, the result of the study shows that there is a need for the concept to be further examined and questioned.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 79.
    Wang, Xun
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    The Change and the Development of the Chinese Euphemisms: A Study Based on a Survey of the Use of Euphemisms byRespondents of Different Age Groups2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Chinese euphemisms have aroused much interest of many researches due

    to its distinctive function and diversity. The choice and use of Chinese euphemisms

    are affected by many factors such as the Chinese traditional culture, social customs,

    people’s self-cultivation, the situation context and linguistic context of a conversation,

    etc. Hence, the progress of society, the development of technology and the renewing

    of the concept make up the dynamic characteristic of the Chinese euphemisms.

    However, most studies focus mainly on the vocabulary people use and their

    expressing habits and patterns, there are few studies focus on how Chinese

    euphemisms develop along with the times. Studies that shed light on how modern

    people use broad euphemisms and narrow euphemisms are even less.

    Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to collect linguistic materials and design a

    questionnaire to make a survey on the current situation of using euphemisms by

    respondents of different age groups. The result of this survey shows that modern

    people are not only becoming less and less indirect in terms of the scope of using

    euphemisms, but also less and less tactful in terms of the vocabulary that they use.

    This phenomenon can be observed when people talk about topics such as death,

    disease, appearance, unemployment, marriage and privacy. Modern people tend to

    be relatively low decoratively worded. In other words, people are to some extent

    becoming less indirect and less tactful. This paper verifies the adaptability as well as

    the updating and upgrading of Chinese euphemisms. It also discusses the linguistic

    diversity of modern people in terms of using broad and narrow euphemisms under

    different contexts.

    This paper will not only help us to understand how Chinese language adapts to

    the change with the times, but also digs deeper into the great role that social culture

    plays in language development.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 80.
    Warell, Peter
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    New Chinese Words in 2014 – A Study of Word-formation Processes2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate how new Chinese words are formed and to examine the linguistic patterns among them. This thesis focused on the analysis of Chinese words formed in 2014. The quantitative data for the analysis included a collection of 423 new Chinese words from the book 2014 汉语新词语 (hànyǔxīn cíyǔ) by Hou and Zhou. Parts of speech and number of syllables in the new words were investigated, although the focus was on word-formation processes. A discussion of derivation, blending, abbreviation, analogy, borrowing, change of meaning, compounding and inventions is also included. The share of each word-formation process used for each of the new words was presented statistically in order to reveal the significance of each word-formation process. The analysis showed that compounding, derivation and abbreviation were the major word-formation processes in 2014. The study also suggests that words formed by derivation and analogy were much more frequent in 2014, in comparison to previous studies. Furthermore, the ways words are formed in Chinese are changing and evolving, as some word-formation processes are becoming more frequently used in the formation of new words.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 81.
    White, Jonathan
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Santos Muñoz, Arantxa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Spanish.
    Yang, Tao
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Attitudes to Digitalisation among Language Teachers2020Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Yang, Tao
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Studying Chinese Characters in a Web-Based Learning Environment: A Case Study of Swedish University Students2020In: Chinese Language Teaching Methodology and Technology, ISSN 2572-1739, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 1-16, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Yang, Tao
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Teaching and learning Chinese in the virtual classroom: effective strategies and digital tools for teaching Chinese characters2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Yang, Tao
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Yan, Jia
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Teaching Chinese Writing System in Web-based Education2014In: NGL2014 Next Generation Learning Conference: Conference programme, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2014, p. 22-22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching the Chinese ideographic writing system in web-based education has become the biggest challenge to the Chinese instructors, in terms of teaching technology and pedagogy. This paper presents the outcome of a research project that aims to overcome the technological obstacles and develop an optimized pedagogic method for teaching characters.

  • 85.
    Yen, Pi-Yin
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    瑞典一个印度客家华人家庭文化认同之个案研究2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the cultural identity of Chinese overseas in Sweden, especially the identity of Chinese culture. A Hakka family in Sweden from Kolkata, India was a target of a case study in this thesis from the viewpoint of life history research and semi-structured interviews for the three female members in this family.The Indian Hakka Chinese, though spending more than 100 years in India, emigrate to other countries commonly. During the migration, this family well sustain their Chinese culture.This research reveals the following findings. Firstly, the identities in the family of this case show the differences between generations. The main deciding factor of their identities is based on both the ethnic identity of Chinese and Chinese culture. The second generation of immigrants in Sweden reveals the dual identities of Chinese culture and Swedish culture, which is consciously decided by them under the social and cultural background of the country of residence.Secondly, this case's family demonstrates a strong atmosphere of Chinese cultural identity in their daily life. The most significant symbol is that family members use Hakka to communicate at home. Furthermore, their cultural values follow a Chinese tradition of family-centred and ethical cultural values. However, in this case, Chinese culture is not as complete as the Chinese mainstream society. It also includes foreign elements in the country of residence. This clearly shows the process of Chinese overseas adapting and integrating with the country of residence.Thirdly, the influencing factors to this case's Chinese cultural identity include the Chinese community in Kolkata India, usage of Chinese language, Chinese education, intermarriage, and the external environment of Swedish society based on democracy multi-culturalism and popularization of internet information under globalization. The key factor in constructing and maintaining the Chinese cultural identity, in this case, is that the elders consciously insist on preserving Chinese tradition in this family.To sum up, this study's results contribute to the knowledge and understanding of Chinese overseas' cultural identity in Sweden.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 86.
    Yu, Chunling
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    中瑞跨文化企业中的文化差异及其影响: 瑞跨文化企业中的文化差异及其影响・・吉利沃尔沃案例2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the development of China's economy, more and more Chinese enterprises start to internationalize themselves by actively involved in international operation. Mergers and acquisitions have become the main entry modes for the Chinese companies to go abroad. However, there are a considerable number of mergers and acquisitions enterprises experienced operational difficulties, one of the main reasons is that they have not prepared to cope with the problems that bring about from the cultural differences.The purpose of this thesis is to identify the influences of cultural differences between Swedish and Chinese culture on the operation of Sino-Sweden acquisitions , in the hope that the study result can provide implications to practitioners in dealing with cultural differences in an acquisition. Hofstede’s cultural dimensions are adopted as the main theoretical framework. In this thesis, Geely Volvo acquisition is used as a case to investigate the influences that cultural differences could bring about to the acquired enterprise. Qualitative research method is adopted, and semi-structured interview is the primary mean of collecting first-hand data. Six Swedish Geely Volvo employees are interviewed; conclusions are drawn based on the data collected.

    Although cultural differences have brought many difficulties and problems to Swedish employees in terms of daily operation and communication the study found that cultural differences also have a positive side,mainly lies on the mutual learning from each other, that is to say, they learn a lot of good things from their partner, getting new inspiration and new ideas. However, the positive influence of the cultural differences needs further investigation by scholars in this area.

    Keywords: Hofstede, Cross - enterprise mergers and acquisitions, Cross - cultural differences ,

    Cultural difference influence

  • 87.
    Zhao, Ling
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    交易双方私人关系对企业社会责任的影响2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The existing literature suggests that the influence of Guanxi on business operation is considered extremely important by both the research community and practitioners. As an important part of the business operation the implementation and performance of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is therefore also affected by Guanxi. What is the effect of Guanxi on CSR and how it influences CSR is the research goal of this thesis project. Three top level managers from three companies in the fabrication industry of smart card in China are invited to participate a oneto-one semi-structured interview. Data collected from the interviews are analyzed using the qualitative approach. Findings of this project are of practical significance. The positive influence of Guanxi on CSR lies mainly in the implementation and performance of economic responsibility; whereas the negative influence lies mainly in the implementation and performance of legal, ethical and philanthropic responsibilities.   

12 51 - 87 of 87
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf