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  • 51. Tandberg, Bente Silnes
    et al.
    Frøslie, Kathrine Frey
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Grundt, Hege
    Lehtonen, Liisa
    Moen, Atle
    Parent-infant closeness, parents' participation, and nursing support in single-family room and open bay NICUs2018In: Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 0893-2190, E-ISSN 1550-5073, Vol. 32, no 4, p. E22-E32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This was a prospective survey study, comparing parent-infant closeness, parents' perceptions of nursing support, and participation in medical rounds in single-family room (SFR) and an open bay (OB) neonatal intensive care units. Nurses' assessments of provided support were also measured. In total, 115 parents of 64 preterm infants less than 35 weeks' gestational age and 129 nurses participated. Parents recorded the presence and skin-to-skin care. Parents were sent 9 text message questions in random order. Nurses answered corresponding Internet-based questions. SFR mothers were more present, 20 hours daily (median) versus 7 hours (P < .001), initiated skin-to-skin contact (SSC) at 4 versus 12 hours (P = .03), and preformed SSC 180 min/24 h versus 120 min/24 h for mothers in the OB unit (P = .02). SFR fathers were also more present, 8 versus 4 hours (P < .001), initiated SSC at 3 versus 40 hours (P = .004), and performed SSC 67 min/24 h versus 31 min/24 h (P = .05). SFR parents rated participation in medical rounds and emotional support higher than OB parents. Parental trust was rated higher by nurses in the OB unit (P = .02). SFR facilitated parent-infant closeness, parents' participation in medical rounds, and increased support from nurses.

  • 52. Tandberg, Bente Silnes
    et al.
    Frøslie, Kathrine Frey
    Markestad, Trond
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Grundt, Hege
    Moen, Atle
    Single-family room design in the neonatal intensive care unit did not improve growth2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 6, p. 1028-1035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim was to compare growth in very premature infants cared for in a single-family room and an open-bay unit. We recorded duration of parental presence and skin-to-skin contact as proxies for parental involvement in care of their infants.

    METHODS: We consecutively included infants with gestational ages 28+0 through 32+0 weeks at two hospitals in Norway, one single-family room unit (n=35) and one open-bay unit (n=42). Weight, length, and head circumference were followed from birth to four months after term date. Both units adhered to the same nutritional protocol and methods of recording events.

    RESULTS: The single-family room mothers spent a mean (standard deviation) of 111 (38) hours and the open bay mothers 33 (13) hours with their infants during the first week and 21 (5) versus 7 (3) hours per day later. The respective duration of skin-to-skin care was 21 (10) versus 12 (8) hours during the first week and 4.2 (2) versus 3.0 (2) hours per day later. The differences were similar, but less pronounced for the fathers. The growth trajectories did not differ between the groups.

    CONCLUSION: Single-family room care was associated with more parental involvement, but not with better growth. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 53. Thomson, Gill
    et al.
    Ebisch-Burton, Kate
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Shame if you do – shame if you don’t: women’s experiences of infant feeding2015In: Maternal and Child Nutrition, ISSN 1740-8695, E-ISSN 1740-8709, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 33-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions such as guilt and blame are frequently reported by non-breastfeeding mothers, and fear and humiliation are experienced by breastfeeding mothers when feeding in a public context. In this paper, we present new insights into how shame-related affects, cognitions and actions are evident within breastfeeding and non-breastfeeding women's narratives of their experiences. As part of an evaluation study of the implementation of the UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative Community Award within two primary (community based) care trusts in North West England, 63 women with varied infant feeding experiences took part in either a focus group or an individual semi-structured interview to explore their experiences, opinions and perceptions of infant feeding. Using a framework analysis approach and drawing on Lazare's categories of shame, we consider how the nature of the event (infant feeding) and the vulnerability of the individual (mother) interact in the social context to create shame responses in some breastfeeding and non-breastfeeding mothers. Three key themes illustrate how shame is experienced and internalised through 'exposure of women's bodies and infant feeding methods', 'undermining and insufficient support' and 'perceptions of inadequate mothering'. The findings of this paper highlight how breastfeeding and non-breastfeeding women may experience judgement and condemnation in interactions with health professionals as well as within community contexts, leading to feelings of failure, inadequacy and isolation. There is a need for strategies and support that address personal, cultural, ideological and structural constraints of infant feeding.

  • 54. Thomson, Gill
    et al.
    Moran, Victoria Hall
    Axelin, Anna
    Dykes, Fiona
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Integrating a sense of coherence into the neonatal environment2013In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 13, article id 84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family centred care (FCC) is currently a valued philosophy within neonatal care; an approach that places the parents at the heart of all decision-making and engagement in the care of their infant. However, to date, there is a lack of clarity regarding the definition of FCC and limited evidence of FCCs effectiveness in relation to parental, infant or staff outcomes.

    Discussion: In this paper we present a new perspective to neonatal care based on Aaron Antonovksy's Sense of Coherence (SOC) theory of well-being and positive health. Whilst the SOC was originally conceptualised as a psychological-based construct, the SOCs three underpinning concepts of comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness provide a theoretical lens through which to consider and reflect upon meaningful care provision in this particular care environment. By drawing on available FCC research, we consider how the SOC concepts considered from both a parental and professional perspective need to be addressed. The debate offered in this paper is not presented to reduce the importance or significance of FCC within neonatal care, but, rather, how consideration of the SOC offers the basis through which meaningful and effective FCC may be delivered. Practice based implications contextualised within the SOC constructs are also detailed.

    Summary: Consideration of the SOC constructs from both a parental and professional perspective need to be addressed in FCC provision. Service delivery and care practices need to be comprehensible, meaningful and manageable in order to achieve and promote positive well-being and health for all concerned.

  • 55.
    Östlund, Åsa
    et al.
    Falun Cent Hosp, Neonatal Unit, Falun, Sweden.
    Nordström, Maria
    Falun Cent Hosp, Paediat Unit, Dept Paediat, Falun, Sweden.
    Dykes, Fiona
    Univ Cent Lancashire, Maternal & Infant Nutr & Nurture Unit, Preston PR1 2HE, Lancs, England.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Univ Childrens Hosp, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Breastfeeding in preterm and term twins - maternal factors associated with early cessation: a population based study2010In: Journal of Human Lactation, ISSN 0890-3344, E-ISSN 1552-5732, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 235-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing trend in Australia and elsewhere for mothers to express breast milk. The purpose of this study was to explore breastfeeding women’s experiences of expressing breast milk. An anonymous online questionnaire was sent to Victorian members of the Australian Breastfeeding Association via an e-mail link. Response fraction was 903 of 3024 (29.9%). The most common reason for expressing milk was to “store extra breast milk” (57%, 479/836). The most important reason was “not enough milk”/“to make more milk” (15%, 118/771). The majority of women (65%, 666/843) used an electric breast pump, and this method of expressing was preferred by 59% (454/769) of women. Adverse effects of pumps were pain (17%, 126/737) and damage to nipples (11%, 86/737). Breast pumps may have a role in enabling women to extend the duration of breast milk feeding, but further research is needed. J Hum Lact. 26(3):258-265.

12 51 - 55 of 55
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