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  • 51.
    Edrud, Pierre
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Haruki Murakami: Female Gender Subversion and Contradicting Confucianism in 1Q842017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to identify how Haruki Murakami depicts the character Aomame with regards to the BSRI scale in the first part in the trilogy 1Q84. The primary data consists of the original work of 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami. The secondary data consists of previous literature and studies in the fields’ literature, psychology and anthropology, which serves to aide in the process of interpreting the primary data. The research is conducted by doing a qualitative research focusing on Murakami’s gender representation of Aomame by analyzing what actions and behavior she exerts throughout the novel. The results of the data will be used in two ways. Primarily it will be used to categorize perceived traits and behavior by applying the BSRI-scale to get a better understanding to what extent Aomame is portrayed in terms of masculinity, femininity and androgyny. The interpreted data will also be used to measure to what extent Confucianism is prevalent on our protagonist and the depicted environment that surrounds her. This research will serve as a purpose to understand Haruki Murakami’s gender representation better, with specific focus on the female character Aomame, and how the BSRI-scale can be used as a tool to assess gender stereotypes in literature.

  • 52.
    Fjordevik, Anneli
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Tyska.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Edfeldt, Chatarina
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Portugisiska.
    What do they learn, why do they learn? A study on university students' participation in fan activities2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    At the Dalarna University (Sweden), which is specialized in online education, there has been a three-year research project called “Informal Learning Environment”, which explored the educational aspects of fan activities and possible ways to apply them in foreign language and literature courses. One part of the project was a study, conducted in two stages. First, an online questionnaire survey on the language student’s awareness about online fan activities, as well as their participation in those, was carried out. In the second stage, seven students that were actively participating in various fan activities were interviewed. The interviews examined the qualitative aspects of the participants’ involvement in fan communities with four different question areas: In what kind of fan activities do they participate?; Why do they participate, and what makes participation attractive to them?; What kind of knowledge and skills (such as language or cultural or other skills) do they think they have developed through participation?; and do they think it is possible to apply this mechanism of informal learning to the university courses? We also asked whether they see any connection between informal learning in the fan communities and their learning at university / college.During the project (which includes the actual application of some fan activities to the courses), various educational elements of fan activities have become clear. In this proposed paper we do the final analysis of the aforementioned study with a focus on the curiosity and playfulness that we could see in this informal learning. Based on the interviews, we will analyze the motivation / mechanism for the intensive learning processes that seem to take place outside the classroom.

  • 53.
    Gilsenan Nordin, Irene
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Engelska.
    Edfeldt, Chatarina
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Portugisiska.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Kinesiska.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Leblanc, André
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Franska.
    Introduction: Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World2016Inngår i: Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World / [ed] Irene Gilsenan Nordin, Chatarina Edfeldt, Lung-Lung Hu, Herbert Jonsson, André Leblanc, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2016, s. 11-20Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the phenomenon of transculturality has existed as long as human culture, the increased speed of movement and communication worldwide has made it impossible to ignore in any aspect of cultural studies. In a society where changes were slow and foreign influences were few, an illusion of culture as homogeneous and static may have been easy to uphold, but in today’s ever-increasing flux of cultural change, the perspective of transculturality is more satisfactory in understanding human identity constructions. Compared with concepts such as interculturality, multiculturality, or hybridity, which all may have some relevance for describing cultural encounters, but which often presuppose the notion of cultural essentialism, the concept of transculturality has the advantage of recognising change and diversity, rather than focusing on boundaries or differences.

  • 54.
    Gilsenan Nordin, Irene
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Engelska.
    Edfeldt, ChatarinaHögskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Portugisiska.Hu, Lung-LungHögskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Kinesiska.Jonsson, HerbertHögskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.Leblanc, AndréHögskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Franska.
    Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World2016Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume takes a broad outlook on the concept of transculturality. Contributions from 19 authors and specialists, of almost as many diverse origins, grapple with this concept, each in their own way. How can transculturality be described? How can it help us understand our world? Many of the chapters deal with literary texts, others with the stories told in movies, drama, and visual art. There are texts about the complexity of the European Burqa-Ban debate, the negative aspects of Portuguese multiculturalism, or the border-crossing experiences of Filipino immigrants in Ireland. Several chapters examine stereotypes, the idea of movement, the dissolution of cultural borders, or the nature of bilingual writing. It is a unique contribution to the field, on a virtually global scale.

  • 55.
    Gyllenfjell, Per
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Case Study of Manga Translation Problems2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
  • 56.
    Hayakawa Thor, Masako
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Svenska barnböcker i Japan2015Inngår i: Översättning för en ny generation: Nordisk barn- och ungdomslitteratur på export / [ed] Alfvén, Valérie; Engel, Hugues; Lindgren, Charlotte, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2015, s. 27-33Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Först ges en historisk tillbakablick över utgivning av utländska barn- och ungdomsböcker i Japan. Därefter fokuseras på utgivningen av svenska barnböcker i Japan. Hittills har fler än 600 barnbokstitlar utgivna på svenska getts ut i Japan. Även finlandssvenska böcker har då räknats in. Sedan Nils Holgerssons underbara resa genom Sverige först kom ut i Japan 1918, dröjde det länge innan en första utgivningsvåg under 1970-talet då 67 titlar utgivna på svenska översattes. De flesta var av Astrid Lindgren och Tove Jansson. En andra utgivningsvåg kom under 1990–2000-talen då ca 200 titlar översattes per decennium. Det stora genombrottet kom tack vare översättarnas stora engagemang för att introducera svenska barnböcker i Japan. Det var översättarnas förtjänst att de japanska bokförlagen fick upp ögonen för svenska barnböcker av andra författare än Astrid Lindgren. Svenska barnboksförfattare har blivit så populära att de till och med kan komma ut med sina böcker först i Japan och sedan återimportera dem till Sverige. Klassiker såsom Pippi Långstrump har översätts om och om igen för att anpassas till nya generationer av läsare. Å andra sidan finns det populära barnböcker i Sverige, såsom Alfons-böcker av Gunilla Bergström och Loranga, Masarin och Dartanjang av Barbro Lindgren, som inte fungerat i Japan pga. skillnader i sociala bakgrunder och uppfattning av humor. För att svenska barnböcker även i framtiden ska nå japanska läsare behövs eldsjälar som är översättare med litterära talanger.

  • 57.
    Hayakawa Thor, Masako
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Saito, Rieko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    日本語オンライン多文化交流会における「対話」を通してのスウェーデン学習者の文化間能力の変容と気づきDevelopment of ‘intercultural competence’ through dialogue during multicultural joint online sessions: a study of swedish learners of japanese2016Inngår i: Japanese language education in the global age: connecting with each other グローバル時代の日本語教育―つながる教育とは, Toronto, 2016, s. 53-62Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 58.
    Hermansson, Daniel
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Lost in mistranslation: A case study of Japanese TV-drama fansubs2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [ja]

    「Fansubs」というのはファンが翻訳した字幕のことである。
 本稿では日本のテレビドラマの「Fansubs」の特徴を調べる為、3つのテレビドラマの日本 語の台詞と、ファンが作った字幕を比べている。原文のテキストが翻訳と字幕制作でどの ように変わったかを情報の増減や誤訳など9つのカテゴリーに分類し、字幕テキストを 分析した。作成したのがプロの翻訳者ではなく、または非常に短期間で作成されたこの 「Fansubs」は、公式のテレビやDVDの字幕よりも誤訳などのエラーが非常に多いことが分 かった。 

  • 59.
    Hård, Arthur
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    The Past Tenses of Early Middle Japanese2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Early Middle Japanese is one of the oldest attested stages of Japanese.

    Its rich legacy consists of several literary works from the Heian era (7

    th

    to 11

    th centuries), some of which are still appreciated and widely read

    today. Despite a long tradition of research both within and outside

    Japan, quite a few details of the language remain incompletely

    understood. The present study addresses a long-standing question in

    the verbal domain of Early Middle Japanese, namely the semantics of

    the two so-called “past tenses” in

    -ki and -ker-. I tested the major

    hypotheses regarding their use by means of qualitative, corpus-based

    methods. Specifically, I trained a machine learning algorithm to

    predict which is likeliest of

    -ki and -ker- given a set of grammatical and

    semantic variables. Analysis of the results indicates that the suffixes

    likely embody a contrast between witnessed and non-witnessed past

    tense. It is also possible that mirativity—the grammaticalized

    expression of surprise at learning something unexpected—and aspect

    influence the choice of past tense suffix.

  • 60.
    Högström, Hampus
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    A study on the Localization of Borderlands 22014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to examine how a game with western background would be localized for the Japanese game market. Although research on the field of localization in general is a bit scarce, one thing that most of the current research has in common is the focus on how Japanese games are localized for the western game market. The research for the opposite side is close to none, which is part of my motivation for choosing this particular subject for my study. In this study, I have examined Gearbox Software’s Borderlands 2. This study will examine how the localization of the game has been carried out with emphasis on how well information – whether it is explicit or implied – is transferred between the original American version and the Japanese localized version of the game. This will be done by comparing dialogue lines side by side between the two versions of the game. The result will be compared with the results presented in previous research on games localized from the Japanese game market to see what similarities might be found.

  • 61.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Atsuko Suga: Vivir en el viaje entre dos mundos2011Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [es]

    Atsuko Suga –Vivir entre dos culturas y dos idiomas

    Atsuko Suga (1929-1998) es la autora/traductora japonesa, que merece el título de un viajero entre Europa y Japón más que nadie  en el tiempo moderno. Su primer viaje a Europa fue en 1953 para estudiar en Francia. La época era después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y ella era de la primera generación de las mujeres japonesas que estudiaba en Europa.

    Sin embargo, su conexión más fuerte con Europa era con Italia. Después de haber vuelto a Japón en el año 1955, se trasladó a Roma, primero para estudiar Sociología pero después cambiando el campo de estudio a literatura. Sin embargo Suga no era una estudiante extranjera cualquiera, como su interés estaba en uno de los movimientos sociales en Italia en esta época, Liberalismo Católico. Siendo católica ella misma, su interés yacía en la búsqueda del punto donde la religión podía fundirse con el activismo social. Se acercó a David. M. Turoldo (1916-1992) que representaba el círculo de la Librería Corsia dei Servi, que fue muy activo en el movimiento.

    Su matrimonio con uno de los líderes del círculo, Giuseppe Ricca, en el año 1961 parecía ser un movimiento que concretara su vínculo con Europa. Sin embargo, la muerte trágica de Giuseppe después de solo X años de matrimonio dejó Atsuko otra vez en la posición entre Europa y Japón.

    No solo en su vida privada, sino en su vida profesional también, Suga se puso entre dos culturas y dos idiomas, empezando a traducir una serie de las obras de la literatura moderna japonesa al italiano, incluso los autores más famosos como Yasunari Kawabata y Shozo Unno. Algunas obras fueron traducidas por la primera vez en Europa. Después de la muerte de su marido, ella seguía con las traducciones, hasta que decidiera a volver a Japón en el año 1971.

    Una vez traslada a Japón, empezó a traducir numerosas novelas y poesía italiana al japonés, presentándolas a la audiencia japonesa por la primera vez. Sus traducciones incluye las obras de Italo Calvino y Antonio Tabucchi entre otras. Suga empezó a escribir sus propias obras que son entre la novela y el ensayo sobre su vida en ambas culturas, cuando tenía ya más de 60 años.

    En la ponencia, se presentará las obras y la vida de esta figura más especial que vivía entre Europa y Japón.

  • 62.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Butsuriteki na kyori wo koete - online kouryuukai no igi (Surpassing the Physical Distance - The Purpose of Japanese Online Conversation Project)2016Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [ja]

    物理的な距離を越えて-オンライン交流会の意義

    ダーラナ大学(スウェーデン) 猪瀬博子

     

    発表要旨

    ダーラナ大学(スウェーデン)では、2015年3月よりグラナダ大学(スペイン)と共同で、オンラインで互いの大学の初級日本語学習者の交流会を行っている。二週間に一度の二時間程度のセッションのために、学習者は予め決められたテーマ(①自己紹介、②私の家族、③クリスマスまたはイースター、④日本に行ってしてみたいこと)についての発表をそれぞれ準備し、オンライン上の小グループで各々発表を行い、ディスカッションを行う。

    本発表では、クラスでは文法習得で精いっぱいになりがちな初級日本語学習者が、オンライン上のディスカッショングループで互いに「つながりたい、つながりやすい」環境を作り出すことで、どのように「コミュニケーションのための日本語」を体感し、これを学ぶことができるかを、参加学生による振り返り、および交流会後のアンケートにより分析していく。

  • 63.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    La traducción de las onomatopeyas y mímesis japonesas2009Inngår i: SENDEBAR, ISSN 1130-5509, E-ISSN 2340-2415, nr 20, s. 31-48Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [un]

    The present study identifi es the methods used in translating onomatopoeic and mimetic words in Japanese literature into Spanish and English, specifically from the novel Sputnik no koibito by Haruki Murakami. Nearly 300 cases are extracted and nine translation methods – using adverbs, adjectives, verbs, nouns, idioms, onomatopoeia in the target language, explicative paraphrase, combinations of words and omission – are identified. Examples are given of each method analysed, and its effectiveness in transmitting the meaning of the original expressions is considered.

  • 64.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Language Spoken by Murakami’s Female Personages and Japanese Pseudo-Translation Style2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Language Spoken by Murakami’s Female Personages and Japanese Pseudo-Translation Style

    Hiroko Inose (Dalarna University, Sweden)

    Murakami’s original Japanese text is often described as if it was “translated” from English. The reason for this can vary, and some mention his use of metaphors imported from English, while others suggest that his sentence structure is close to that of English language. The present study suggests yet another element which might be contributing to such claim – the Japanese female language spoken by Murakami’s female personages.

    Japanese female speech patterns (onna-kotoba) can be found most frequently in texts translated into Japanese from other languages, where it appears much more often than in actual language spoken by today’s Japanese women. This includes not only fictions, but also translation of interviews or film/TV subtitles and dubbings. It is very possible that this excessive use of now classical female language in translated texts has contributed to the creation of a prototypical image of “translated Japanese” style.

    The present study analyses several female personages in Murakami’s works from different periods (e.g. Sputunik Sweetheart, Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage among others) to compare their articulation style to the female speech patterns frequently found in translated Japanese texts.  It also considers in the Murakami’s original Japanese text, what nuance this female speech pattern is adding to the female personages– in other words, what has to be inevitably lost or changed in translation into other languages which do not differentiate male/female/neutral speech patterns as markedly as in Japanese.     

  • 65.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Literature Translation as Re-importation: When the Text Travels Twice Between Cultures2017Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature Translation as Re-importation: When the Text Travels Twice Between Cultures

    Name: Hiroko Inose

    Contact address: hin@du.se

    Affiliation: Dalarna University (Sweden)

    In the field of literature translation, the treatment of cultural references becomes one of the major issues. In order to transfer the source culture (i.e. the culture of the source text, ST) into the target culture (i.e. the culture of the target text, TT), there are numbers of translation strategies. However, the problem becomes even more complicated if the text has to travel not only once, but twice between the source and target cultures.

    This can happen in various ways, but one case is when a ST, written about the target culture, is translated into the target language (TL), to be read by the readers of the target culture.  For example, translating a novel on Japanese traditional culture published in U.S. and written in English into Japanese language would give a series of special translation problems that would not occur when the same novel is translated into any other language. This is not only because of the distance between English and Japanese languages and differences in their structures, but because of the significant difference of cultural knowledge between ST (in this case, English original version) and TT (in this case Japanese translation) readers – unlike in the usual case of translation, the TT readers are expected to have much more knowledge than ST readers about the cultural themes treated in the novel. This may be called re-importation of culture. The target culture is first imported into the ST for the ST readers, and then re-imported into the TT through translation.

    The present study will focus on language combinations English/Japanese and French/Japanese, and study novels written on traditional or current Japanese culture and society that have been translated into Japanese.  Original and translation of novels such as Memoir of a Geisha (Arthur Golden,1999), An Artist of the Floating World (Kazuo Ishiguro, 1986) or Stupeur et Tremblements (Amélie Nothomb,1999) will be analysed to see the translation problems encountered, as well as translation strategies used to solve them.

  • 66.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Not crossing the boundary: the untranslatable in Japanese-English bilingual literature2016Inngår i: Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World / [ed] Irene Gibson Nordin, Chatarina Edfeldt, Lung-Lung Hu, Herbert Jonsson and André Leblanc, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2016, 1, s. 219-234Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    The act of choosing the language(s) in which one expresses oneself, or the decision to cross  boundaries between  languages, is closely related to  one’s identity. If this is considered in the context of Japanese literature, Japanese authors like Kyoko Mori and Yoko Tawada started writing in other languages in the 1990s. Around the same time, non-Japanese writers, such as Levy Hideo and Arthur Binard, started publishing works written in Japanese. While this crossing of the Japanese language boundary in both directions has been taking place, one could also find some authors who chose not to use one language, but decided to mix several. This is called bilingual literature, where the authors use more than one language within the same text, often without translation, such as in the case of Shishosetsu from left to right by Minae Mizumura (1995) or Chorus of Mushrooms (1994) by Hiromi Goto. Both these writers mix English and Japanese languages in the text, the former novel having been published in Japan and the latter in Canada.  This type of work is unique, since what is transmitted, which could be considered a gap between two languages or cultures, or the disturbing sense of not being able to understand the complete text, prevents translation, at least into the “second” language used in these novels. It might also suggest what these authors consider to be  untranslatable due to either linguistic or cultural distance or both.  In the current study, the language and cultural hybridity of the above-mentioned works of Mizumura and Goto will be analysed partly in relation to the concept of translatability in translation studies.

  • 67.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Not Crossing the Bounday: What is Untranslatable in Bilingual Literature2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The act of choosing the language(s) with which one expresses oneself, or the decision of crossing a boundary of languages, would be deeply related to one's identity. If we see this in the context of literature in Japan, Japanese authors started writing in other languages (e.g. Kyoko Mori, Yoko Tawada) in 1990s. Around the same time, non-Japanese writers such as Levy Hideo and Arthur Binard started publishing works written in Japanese.

    While this "crossing the boundary of Japanese language" to both directions has been taking place, we could also find some authors that chose not to choose one language, but decided to mix several. It is hybrid literature in which the authors use more than one language within the same text, often without translation, such as in cases of Shishosetsu From Left to Right by Minae Mizumura (1995), or Chorus of Mushrooms (1994) by Hiromi Goto. They both mix English and Japanese languages in the texts, though the former was published in Japan, and the latter in Canada.  This type of work is unique since what it is transmitting, which could be a gap between two languages or cultures, or a disturbing sensation of not being able to understand whole of the text, refuses translation, at least into the "second" languages used in these novels. It might also suggest what these authors felt "not translatable" for either linguistic or cultural distance (or both). 

    In the current study, the language and cultural “hybridity” of the above mentioned works of Minamura and Goto will be analysed, partly in relation with the concept of the translatability in translation studies.

  • 68.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Scanlation - What Fan Translators of Manga Learn in the Informal Learning Environment2012Inngår i: The Proceedings Book of ISLC 2012, 2012, s. 73-84Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper discusses two pilot studies carried out to see the possibility of the fan community of manga (Japanese comics), in which fan translators translate the original Japanese manga into English (which is called scanlation), functioning as an informal learning environment for the Japanese language learning and translator training. Two pilot studies consist of a) comparison of the original Japanese version with the scanlation and official translation, and b) comparison of the original Japanese version with two different versions of scanlation to see the translators’ level of Japanese language and the overall translation quality. The results show that in scanlation versions, there were numbers of inaccuracies which would prevent them to be treated as professional translation. Some of these errors are clearly caused by insufficient understanding of Japanese language by the translator. However, the pilot studies also suggested some interesting features of fan translation, such as the treatment of cultural references. The two pilot studies indicate that it is desirable to conduct further studies with more data, in order to confirm the results of present studies, and to see the possible relationship between the types of trnalsation errors found in scanlation and the particular type of Japanese language (informal, conversational) that could be learned from manga.

  • 69.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Scanlation: Foreign Fans of Japanese Subculture Translating Manga2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The subculture of manga (Japanese comics) and anime (Japanese animations) has been exported to practically all over the world, including U.S., Europe, Asia and Latin America, creating the fandom that could affect one’s identity on various levels. One example of very direct influence of this subculture could be found in cosplay, where fans dress up as their favourite manga or anime characters, and often participate in a competition.

    On the other level of influence, the crave for “more of” manga/anime work could make the fans adopt the identity as creators, or sometimes translators. There are numerous secondary creations, in the form of amateur novels or manga, creating new episodes, using the existing manga or anime characters. Another way to “have more” is to be able to read/see the newest episode of particular manga or anime work as soon as possible, or to be able to appreciate the works which have not been released outside Japan. In this case, the fans could adopt the role of not the creator but the translator.

    In fact, one can find the newest manga/anime episode within few days or even hours after its release in Japan, translated into other languages and subtitled (in case of anime). These scanlation (in case of manga) and fansub (in case of anime) works are all released on internet for free. In fact, the whole process of scanlating, that is scanning the original material, cleaning the image, translating, and editing – is done for free, normally by teams of fans. The translation into English and Chinese are often done from the original Japanese version, which means fan translators have somehow learned Japanese language.

    The presentation will be on the manga subculture outside Japan, with its special focus on scanlation, an exercise very popular among manga fans in spite of its dubious legal status (in relation to the copyright). Academically this field is not yet studied extensively, and the presentation will introduce the overall structure and situation of this fan translation of manga.

  • 70.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Shousetsu oyobi manga ni mirareru nihongo giongo gitaigo no honyaku shuhou no hikaku - eigo oyobi supeingo wo reini (ENG: The comparison of translation techniques of Japanese Onomatopoeias and Mimetic Words - Seeing English and Spanish Languages as Examples)2011Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 71.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    The functions of Japanese Sound Symbolic Words in Different Types of Texts and Their Translation2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Though sound symbolic words (onomatopoeia and mimetic words, or giongo and gitaigo in Japanese) exist in other languages, it would not be so easy to compare them to those in Japanese. This is because unlike in Japanese, in many other languages (here we see English and Spanish) sound symbolic words do not have distinctive forms that separate them immediately from the rest of categories of words. In Japanese, a sound symbolic word has a radical (that is based on the elaborated Japanese sound symbolic system), and often a suffix that shows subtle nuance. Together they give the word a distinctive form that differentiates it from other categories of words, though its grammatical functions could vary, especially in the case of mimetic words (gitaigo). Without such an obvious feature, in other languages, it would not be always easy to separate sound symbolic words from the rest.

    These expressions are extremely common and used in almost all types of text in Japanese, but their elaborated sound symbolic system and possibly their various grammatical functions are making giongo and gitaigo one of the most difficult challenges for the foreign students and translators. Studying the translation of these expressions into other languages might give some indication related to the comparison of Japanese sound symbolic words and those in other languages.

    Though sound symbolic words are present in many types of texts in Japanese, their functions in traditional forms of text (letters only) and manga (Japanese comics)are different and they should be treated separately. For example, in traditional types of text such as novels, the vast majority of the sound symbolic words used are mimetic words (gitaigo) and most of them are used as adverbs, whereas in manga, the majority of the sound symbolic words used (excluding those appear within the speech bubbles) are onomatopoeias (giongo) and often used on their own (i.e. not as a part of a sentence). Naturally, the techniques used to translate these expressions in the above two types of documents differ greatly.

    The presentation will focus on i) grammatical functions of Japanese sound symbolic words in traditional types of texts (novels/poems) and in manga works, and ii) whether their features and functions are maintained (i.e. whether they are translated as sound symbolic words) when translated into other languages (English and Spanish). The latter point should be related to a comparison of sound symbolic words in Japanese and other languages, which will be also discussed.

  • 72.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Traducir las onomatopeyas y las mímesis de manga: cómo recrear el simbolismo fonético japonés2012Inngår i: Puertas a la Lectura, ISSN 1575-9997, nr 24, s. 97-109Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The entry of works of manga to foreign countries has been made through the original translation into several languages. If the Spanish language translation at first through the third language (eg English) was quite common. However, market development and the "subculture" of fans demanding as faithful to the original in every way (even the direction of reading and the size of the book), is now more normal conduct the translation of the original, ie the Japanese language. In this article we focus on the translation of the Japanese onomatopoeia and mimesis in the works coming out wide. In the translation of manga, the Japanese onomatopoeia and mimesis written (or almost "drawn") out of the sandwiches can be problems for translators. It is not always easy to find equivalent expressions in other languages, nor is it easy to skip them, because they are written directly into the bullets and sometimes costly or technically difficult to remove. The use of onomatopoeia and mimesis is one of the salient features of the Japanese language and are deeply related to the Japanese phonetic symbolism. In this article, we use these expressions and sleeve very briefly, before examining some translation techniques such expressions. We will also see examples of iberomanga, which is a genre of manga created by the authors speaking.

  • 73.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Translating Japanese Onomatopoeia and Mimetic Words2008Inngår i: Translation and Research Project 1 / [ed] Pym, Anthony, Tarragona, Spain: Universitat Rovira i Virgili , 2008, s. 97-116Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study identifies the methods used in translating Japanese onomatopoeic and mimetic words in literature into Spanish and English. From the novel Sputnik no koibito by Haruki Murakami, which was used as the data source, almost 300 cases are extracted and nine methods (using adverbs, adjectives, verbs, nouns, idioms, onomatopoeia in the target language, explicative phrases, combinations of words and omission) are identified. Each method is analyzed with some examples, considering its effectiveness in transmitting the meaning of the original expressions.

  • 74.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Translating Japanese Onomatopoeia and Mimetic Words in Manga2010Inngår i: Interpreting and Translation Studies: The Journal of the Japan Association for Interpreting and Translation Studies, ISSN 1883-7522, nr 10, s. 161-176Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 75.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Translating Japanese Onomatopoeia and Mimetic Words in Manga into Spanish and English2012Inngår i: Translationswissenschaft : Alte und neue Arten der Translation in Theorie und Praxis : Tagungsband der 1. Internationalen Konferenz TRANSLATA "Translationswissenschaft: gestern - heute - morgen", 12.-14. Mai 2011, Innsbruck = Translation studies: old and new types of translation in theory and practice : proceedings of the 1st International Conference TRANSLATA "Translation & interpreting research : yesterday - today - tomorrow", May 12-14, 2011, Innsbruck / [ed] Lew Zybatow; Alena Petrova; Michael Ustaszewski, Wien: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 76.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Translating Japanese Onomatopoeia and Mimetic Words in Manga into Spanish and English2011Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    TRANSLATING JAPANESE ONOMATOPOEIA AND MIMETIC EXPRESSIONS IN MANGA INTO SPANISH AND ENGLISH

    Dr. HIROKO INOSE (Lecturer, Department of Japanese, Dalarna University, Sweden)

    Onomatopoeic and mimetic expressions are widely used in almost all levels of Japanese language, giving it a richness of the expression. However, due to their elaborated sound symbolic system, those expressions are a challenge for Japanese language students and translators. The present paper focuses on those expressions used in manga, or Japanese comics, and their translation into Spanish and English. Maison Ikkoku, a famous work by Rumiko Takahashi, is used as the main corpus.

    In the first 3 chapters which were used as the corpus, more than 140 cases of using onomatopoeias and mimetic words were found. As for the techniques used to translate them, 9 were identified in both English and Spanish versions, though they do not coincide with each other. The present paper categorizes and analyses those techniques, and discuss their effectiveness.

    The study shows that the use of these expressions in original Japanese manga differs from their use in more traditional style texts, such as Japanese novels. This, by itself, is not surprising since manga has drawings as well as texts to transmit messages. However, the different use of these expressions in this genre seems to have lead to the adoption of different techniques of translation as well. In the translation of manga the translators use a series of more dynamic and original techniques compared to the techniques used to translate these expressions in novels, such as neologism or use of the third language.

  • 77.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Translation of "Falling" of Fumiko Hayashi with note of the translator2007Inngår i: Translation, Vol. 2, s. 29-38Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 78.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    「十帖源氏」スペイン語翻訳における文化的レファレンスの取り扱い(The handling of cultural references in translating Genji in Ten Chapters into Spanish)2015Inngår i: Kaigai Heian Bungaku Kenkyu Journal, ISSN 2188-8035, Vol. 3, s. 91-98Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 79.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    文化的レファレンス―マンガを教材とした日本語教育: Cultural Reference: Manga as Japanese Language Teaching Material2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [ja]

    文化的レファレンス―マンガを教材とした日本語教育

    今日、外国人学生が大学・高校等で日本語を学ぶ大きなきっかけの一つがマンガやアニメの存在であることはよく知られている。実際、元来サブカルチャーであったこれらのジャンルは日本文化の海外への輸出手段として注目されるようになり、「コンテンツビジネス」として、経済産業省等の政府機関が輸出に力を入れる分野ともなっている。また国際交流基金も、日本語教育におけるこれらのコンテンツの有用性を利用して、マンガ・アニメ形式の教材を開発している。

    本発表では、言語および文化教育におけるマンガの利用法について考察する。発表者はスウェーデンの大学にて日本語中級レベルの学生を対象に、マンガ四冊を十週間で読むReading Mangaというコースを担当しているが、本発表ではこのコースの内容のみに限らず、①自国語に翻訳されたマンガを読むレベル、②日本語オリジナルのマンガを読みはじめるレベル、③自ら日本語のマンガを翻訳してみるレベル、の三つのレベルにおいて、日本語(および日本語からの翻訳)の学生が、何を学べるかを概観する。①の段階では学生は必ずしも日本語を学んでいる必要はないが、マンガの欧米語への翻訳では翻訳者が原作の文化的レファレンスに非常に忠実であるという特徴があるため、翻訳者による注が非常に詳細にわたって示されており、読者は自然と特定の日本語の単語や文化的背景について学ぶ結果となる。②のレベルでは、学生は一年間程度日本語の基本的な文法を学んでいるが、文化的レファレンスのほかに口語、擬音語・擬態語、役割語など言語的にもマンガを原作で読むことで学べる点は多い。③のレベルでは、発表者が大学で担当している日英翻訳のコース(日本語上級者対象)で翻訳文書の一つとしてマンガを扱っており、ここで学生が直面することになる翻訳上の問題を例に挙げる。ジャンルにもよるが、一般的にマンガには文化的レファレンス、およびそのパロディが多用されており、原文の意味を完全に把握するには日本語能力のみだけでなく、文化的知識も必要とされるのである。

    時間的な制限もあり、本発表では上記①②③についての詳細な考察は難しいが、実例を多用することで、マンガが言語教育、文化教育の双方において非常に豊かなリソースであることを検証したい。

    要旨

    日本語学習の大きなきっかけの一つとして、アニメやマンガが注目をあびている。本発表では、①他言語に翻訳されたマンガを読む、②日本語オリジナルのマンガを読み始める、そして③自分で日本語から翻訳する、という三つのレベルで、学習者が日本語と日本文化について何を学べるかを考える。

  • 80.
    Inose, Hiroko
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Aronsson, Mattias
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Franska.
    Fjordevik, Anneli
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Tyska.
    Fan activities applied to online university education2016Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation discusses a possible way of adapting internet fan activities to the academic level online education. At the Dalarna University (Sweden), which is specialized in online education, there was a three-year project called “Informal Learning Environment”, which explored the educational aspects of fan activities, and the possible ways to apply them in language (French, German, Japanese, Portuguese) and literature courses.

    The educational effects of fan activities are mentioned by various authors (e.g. James Paul Gee), and we focused on two activities, Fan Fiction and Scanlation.

    In the Fan Fiction exercise, the students in French and German Literature had an introduction on Fan Fiction, then were asked to choose one of the literary works studied during the semester, and write a short fictional story based on it. Each student uploaded his/her text to the learning platform and then received peer-feedback from others.

    In the Scanlation exercise, a group work was designed for the Translation course (Japanese-English translation). Students formed groups of threes and fours and each group translated two different chapters from Shisso Nikki, a manga by Hideo Aduma. They had two weeks to work together, and then the translations were uploaded to the learning platform. Each student then gave comment and feedback to the chapters translated by other groups.

    In all courses, students were asked to evaluate the activities afterwards. The evaluation focused on if they enjoyed the activity, what they learned, and what the peer-feedback meant to them. Since we teach only online courses, the web-based interaction becomes very central. This is also the case in fan communities. Therefore, our hypothesis is that connecting fan activities with web-based teaching may be a way to develop and improve the formal academic learning environment.

  • 81.
    Inose, Hiroko
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Edfeldt, Chatarina
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Portugisiska.
    Fjordevik, Anneli
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Tyska.
    Fan Culture as an Informal Learning Environment: Presentation of a NGL project2012Inngår i: NGL 2012 NEXT GENERATION LEARNING CONFERENCE February 21–23, 2012 Falun, Sweden : CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna , 2012, s. 105-112Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Fan culture is a subculture that has developed explosively on the internet over the last decades. Fans are creating their own films, translations, fiction, fan art, blogs, role play and also various forms that are all based on familiar popular culture creations like TV-series, bestsellers, anime, manga stories and games. In our project, we analyze two of these subculture genres, fan fiction and scanlation.

    Amateurs, and sometimes professional writers, create new stories by adapting and developing existing storylines and characters from the original. In this way, a "network" of texts occurs, and writers step into an intertextual dialogue with established writers such as JK Rowling (Harry Potter) and Stephanie Meyer (Twilight). Literary reception and creation then merge into a rich reciprocal creative activity which includes comments and feedback from the participators in the community.

    The critical attitude of the fans regarding quality and the frustration at waiting for the official translation of manga books led to the development of scanlation, which is an amateur translation of manga distributed on the internet. 

    Today, young internet users get involved in conceptual discussions of intertextuality and narrative structures through fan activity. In the case of scanlation, the scanlators practice the skills and techniques of translating in an informal environment. This phenomenon of participatory culture has been observed by scholars and it is concluded that they contribute to the development of a student’s literacy and foreign language skills. Furthermore, there is no doubt that the fandom related to Japanese cultural products such as manga, anime and videogames is one of the strong motives for foreign students to start learning Japanese.

    This is something to take into pedagogical consideration when we develop web-based courses. Fan fiction and fan culture make it ​​possible to have an intensive transcultural dialogue between participators throughout the world and is of great interest when studying the interaction between formal and informal learning that puts the student in focus

  • 82.
    Inoue, Miyoko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Phonetic cues used by Swedish speaking learners in perception of Japanese quantity2011Inngår i: Achievements and perspectives in the SLA of speech: New Sounds 2010 : Volume I / [ed] Magdalena Wrembel, Małgorzata Kul, Katarzyna Dziubalska-Kołaczyk, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2011, s. 149-160Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish and Japanese are known as languages that have quantity and both of them use duration as a primary acoustic cue for the long/short distinction. An identification task was conducted for Swedish learners of Japanese (SJ) and native Japanese speakers (NJ) with duration and pich accent as the variables. The results showed that SJ performed similarly to NJ with the variation of duration and pitch accent for long/short vowels, but not with pitch accent for long/short consonants. This suggested that the Swedes responded both to duration and pitch accent to identify the long/short vowels like the native speakers, but used only duration for consonants.

  • 83.
    Inoue, Miyoko
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Suweedengo bogowasha no hatsuwa ni okeru nihongo no on'intekina nagasa no jitsugen ni tsuite2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 84.
    Jakus, Viktoria Kristina
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    A cross-linguistic case study of refusals: An analysis of pragmatic transfer of Japanese immigrants in Croatian language2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    How one refuses an offer or invitation differs depending on specific cultures and one’s personal view towards interlocutors. This paper will focus on 4 Japanese immigrants and compare their refusal strategies to those of 5 Croats, while looking for indications of pragmatic transfer and considering the power-relationship between interlocutors. 4 Japanese immigrants and 5 Croatian informants answered a Discourse Completion Task (DCT) that consisted of 14 situations. The results displayed that omission of the segment of "gratitude" was the most frequent indication of pragmatic transfer; therefore, only 2 situations that involve refusing from equal status interlocutors have been discussed. Although both groups of informants view close friends and acquaintances as equal status interlocutors, the Japanese informants did not express "gratitude" when refusing offers and invitations, while the Croatian informants did. The Croatian informants consider expressing gratitude is polite and necessary when refusing an offer; furthermore, there is an indication that the Croatian informants are more focused on the degree of familiarity, rather than on the interlocutor’s status; while the Japanese informants are more concerned with the power-relationship between interlocutors.

  • 85.
    Jernqvist, Erik
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Students' views on the learning of kanji: A study the views and experiences of students at the Swedish universities concerning the teaching and learning of Chinese characters as used in Japanese2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Kanji, the Chinese characters adopted to write the Japanese language, is often mentioned as

    one of the most difficult aspects of mastering said language. This is especially said about people

    from outside the Sinosphere i.e. PRC, Taiwan, North and South Korea, Japan and Vietnam. In the

    following thesis 12 students studying the Japanese language at Swedish universities were

    interviewed about their experiences when it comes to learning and being taught about kanji.

    A chapter summarizing some of the research that is relevant to this thesis is also included.

    Topics touched upon in this and the result chapter include the desire for more structured approach to

    kanji learning based on breaking down the characters into elemental components, spaced repetition

    (SRS), mnemonics.

  • 86.
    Johansson, Erik
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Change in Meaning in the Swedish Dub of Spirited Away: A translation study on dubbing using a pivot language2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to study the results of dubbing from Japanese to Swedish using a pivot language. The author examines the Swedish dubbed version of the Japanese animated film

    Spirited Away by comparing it to the original version and finding differences in what in-formation is conveyed through the dialogue. Because the Swedish dubbed version has been translated using the English language script as a base, the English dubbed version is also examined. The findings are then presented, categorized and analysed according to where the changes have appeared and what they consist of. Finally, the results are dis-cussed and compared to previous findings in the field. The study finds how many lines of dialogue have been altered, and that the use of a pivot language has greatly increased the number of altered lines, although no proof was found of an increased amount of mistrans-lations. The increased amount of altered lines leads to the conclusion that the usage of a pivot language can be problematic.

  • 87.
    Johansson, Vanja
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Between the Lines: Japanese-to-English Song Translations and Singability2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    In translation of lyrics, there is a lot to consider that may not have evident counterparts in other forms of translation – for example, whether the translation result ends up being singable or not, or if it simply is conveying the meaning of the lyrics in another language, which could arguably fall under general translation studies and has been addressed within the field before. However, from the perspective of Japanese-to-English lyrics and how these can be handled, the field is somewhat lacking in material – even more so from the perspective of fan-made translations. Thus, this project will aim to address this by investigating the theory behind song translation of lyrics and how to translate them into singable versions. It will then attempt to outline and discuss how the restrictions of singability may alter the message of the songs compared to the originals, why this may happen, and what to define the results as.This will be done by performing an analysis of already existing, fan-made translations of lyrics and their rewritten singable counterparts within a chosen fanbase, then translating an originally Japanese song into English before rewriting it into a singable version, while documenting the process.

  • 88.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Andetag i krigets brand: Sô Sakon: Ryggsim mot dödsriket2017Inngår i: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, nr 2, s. 82-Artikkel, omtale (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 89.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Buson no tsukeairon2010Inngår i: Aruzasu nichio¯ chiteki ko¯ryu¯ jigyo¯ nihon kenkyu¯ semina¯ edo ronbunshu¯, Tokyo: Japan Foundation & CEEJA , 2010, s. 91-113Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 90.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Buson no tsukeairon2008Inngår i: The Research Seminar in Japanese Studies about the Edo-period at the CEEJA, Kientzheim, 2008Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 91.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Defense of rules or creative innovation?: A discussion of the essences of seasonal topics in Japanese haiku2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal topics are important to most modern and premodern Japanese haiku. Although so-called free haiku often is composed without references to the season, most haiku composed according to more “traditional” formats make use of seasonal words or topics. These are words or short expressions that are related to the season in various ways. Much criticism about haiku is concerned with these seasonal topics. One of the aspects that is often discussed is the hon’i, the “essence” these topics are supposed to have. It is often seen as a set of specific characteristics connected to a certain topic, which have been established by tradition and knowledge of these essences are regarded as essential, not only for writing haiku poetry, but also for appreciating haiku as a reader. Using a certain seasonal topic, the remaining part of the poem should somehow express this essence to become successful.

    In this paper I will investigate how the topic harusame (“spring rain”) has been used in a number of poems and compare these results with how this topic’s essence has been described by some critics. I will start looking at the arguments of a number of influential critics in the field, who demonstrate a very limited view about these essences. These will be confronted with a few studies of the seasonal topics that are more directed towards the actual usage in the poetry. Broadening the perspective in this way, I will continue with an analysis of a number of poems written around the “spring rain” topic. I will especially put focus on the works of the eighteenth-century haiku poet Yosa Buson, who wrote an unusually large number of poems on this topic. The discussion will cover earlier interpretations of some of these poems and will show how these both adhere to and turn away from the supposed limited essence of the theme. The essence as such will be shown to be much richer than what is possible to define with a set of rules.

    The approach to discuss the essence of a seasonal topic as solely some sort of fixed convention, something artificially constructed by the tradition, may be understood as a consequence of the mainly semiotic theories of language and literature that have been in fashion in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. This extremely narrow theoretical stance has made it difficult to discuss a theory of essences from a more creative point of view. My suggestion is, however, that the search for an essence, which is carried out every time a poem is written, is an investigation in the aspects of a theme or a topic with the aim to make it vivid and give it a forceful and tangible expression. The analysis of the actual poetry will show that the search for essences is not necessarily a process of defining limits and setting up rules, but a search for ever new perspectives that may make a topic come to life, a creative search for how to “catch” a certain phenomenon rather than a process of defining right and wrong according to tradition.

    Since the haiku movement basically was, and still is, an innovative movement that always tries to push forward towards yet a different perspective on the world, I will argue that rather than discussing the poetry from within limited theoretical frameworks, an investigation about the unique way in which a certain topic has been used in each poem, will make more sense. It will also be necessary to read a poem, not against the limited framework of cultural conventions, but against any possible aspect of human experience.

  • 92.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Dikter på distans: Recension av Kejsarinnan Michikos Strömdrag2009Inngår i: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, nr 1, s. 117-118Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 93.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    "Där var det, mitt ansikte": Två haikupoeter från förra seklet på svenska2011Inngår i: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, nr 3, s. 80-82Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 94.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    En 1300-talsförfattare som skriver vad som faller honom in2016Inngår i: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, nr 2, s. 80-81Artikkel, omtale (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 95.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    En bloggare i 900-talets Japan: Sei Shônagon, Kuddboken2012Inngår i: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, nr 3, s. 75-Artikkel, omtale (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 96.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    En 'giftig kvinnas' upp- och nedgång i 1800-talets Japan: Recension av Gatusångerskan Omatsus äventyr av Hikosaku Kubota2006Inngår i: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, nr 4, s. 78-79Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 97.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Examples of Surrealism in Buson’s Hokku2005Inngår i: The 11th International Conference of the EAJS, Wien, 2005Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 98.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Från ett mysterium till ett annat: Recension av Haruki Murakamis Kafka på stranden2007Inngår i: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, nr 1, s. 71-72Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 99.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Haikai Poetics: Buson, Kitô and the Interpretation of Renku Poetry2006Doktoravhandling, monografi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The dissertation is a study of the poetics of haikai in eighteenth-century Japan. It is more specifically concerned with the works of Yosa Buson and some of his followers. Rather than being a study of certain poems, it is an investigation of theories of aesthetics and composition, and of criticism. Most studies of haikai focus on the short haiku (or hokku) form, but the present study is more concerned with the core form of this poetry, the long chains of verses called "renku" or "haikai no renga". One important object of this study is to challenge some of the established views of haikai found in modern scholarship. For this purpose, many standpoints of haikai theory have been found useful, since they often approach questions of interpretation from new and unexpected angles. Theoretical stances that stress convention and traditionalism are criticized and the spirit of haikai is found to be more in concord with theories of cognitive poetics. The dissertation consists of three parts. The first is a study of general haikai theory. In this part are discussed theories of aesthetics, theories of creativity, and a few questions related to the interpretation of this kind of poetry. This discussion focuses on those questions that are central in Buson’s own writing on poetics and puts them into a broader context. The second part deals with practical theories of renku composing. An introductory chapter gives a historical background to many concepts used in Buson’s age, and this is followed by a full translation and critical study of a renku treatise written by his disciple Takai Kito. The last part is an investigation of modern criticism written on Buson’s renku. All existing full-length studies of these poems are discussed in comparison. The absence of a long critical tradition concerning Buson’s renku has, in many cases, prevented the formation of established interpretations, and this is ideal for a study of this kind.

  • 100.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Språk och medier, Japanska.
    Haikai Poetics: The Theory and Aesthetics of Linked Poetry in the Age of Buson2008Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The spirit of haikai has always been subversive. In poetry haikai began as an underground movement, motivated by a desire to explore the forbidden, to ridicule the established, and to tear down dogmatic rules and conventions. At times it has been humorous and witty; full of parody and word-play, but at times it has become a serious search for ever new ways to understand our existence; a struggle to overcome the limitations imposed on us by tradition and habits. Unfortunately, popular belief as well as much serious scholarship has it that haikai is rule-bound, conservative, and stuck in tradition. Japanese culture is all too often supposed to be backward-looking and reverent of the past. One important aim of this study is to challenge such views, to show their shortcomings and replace them by more fruitful descriptions. Its main focus is on a number of theoretical works written in the eighteenth century and makes a detailed discussion of the poetics developed in these. It is a study which may be of interest for those looking for a new and fresh approach to this kind of poetry, an approach which at the same time comes closer to the original haikai spirit.

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