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  • 801.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    "What I want you to remember is…": Audience orientation in monologic academic genres2012In: English Text Construction, ISSN 1874-8767, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 101-120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 802.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Writer/reader visibility in research articles:: Variability across language, regional variety, discipline and gender2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Writer/reader visibility in research articles has been studied contrastively between English and other languages (e.g. Dahl 2004; Pérez Llantada 2010; Sanderson 2008; Vassileva 1998). This study considers several variables potentially affecting discourse patterns: language culture (English; Swedish), regional variety (British; American English), discipline (History; Linguistics; Literary Studies) and gender. The phenomenon studied is metadiscourse, defined as reflexive linguistic expressions referring to the evolving discourse itself, including references to the writer-speaker and the audience of the current discourse (Ädel 2006). The study is based on a 1.6 million word corpus of single-authored research articles. The English-language material consists of 96 and the Swedish material 70 articles. All three disciplines are represented in the English material, but the Swedish material presently includes only Linguistics. The findings include first and second person pronouns used metadiscursively. Nouns referring to the writer/reader were also studied and found to be marginal. Second-person pronouns occur rarely in the English and never in the Swedish material. First-person pronoun use exhibits considerable variation: occurrences of ‘I’ range from 1-28 and ‘we’ from 0.5-32 per 10,000 words. There are disciplinary trends in the English data, with an average of 15 occurrences/article in Linguistics, 11 in Literary Studies and 3 in History, following the same order as in Sanderson (2008). The results for regional variety are similar, with the exception of ‘we’, used considerably more often by the British authors. No major differences based on gender were found, in contrast to Sanderson (2008). In the Swedish material, ‘I’ is almost twice as frequent as ‘we’, which makes it dissimilar to both the British data where ‘we’ predominates and the US data where the distribution is even. The talk closes with a discussion of multivariate statistics, consistency in findings and research design in this type of research on scholarly writing practices.

     

    References

    Ädel, A. (2006). Metadiscourse in L1 and L2 English. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

    Dahl, T. (2004). Textual metadiscourse in research articles: A marker of national culture or of academic discipline? Journal of Pragmatics, 36(10), 1807–1825.

    Pérez-Llantada, C. (2010). The discourse functions of metadiscourse in published academic writing: Issues of culture and language. In Ädel, A. & A. Mauranen (Eds.) Nordic

    Journal of English Studies, 9(2), 41–68.

    Sanderson, T. (2008). Corpus, Culture, Discourse. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag.

    Vassileva, I. (1998). Who am I/who are we in academic writing?: A contrastive analysis of authorial presence in English, German, French, Russian and Bulgarian. International Journal of Applied Linguistics, 8(2).

  • 803.
    Ädel, Annelie
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Carrio-Pastor, María Luisa
    Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain.
    Seminar on “Technology implementation in second language teaching”2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 804.
    Ädel, Annelie
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Swales, John
    University of Michigan.
    Narratives of nature in English and Swedish: Butterfly books and the case of Argynnis paphia2013In: Of butterflies and birds, of dialects and genres: Essays in honour of Philip Shaw / [ed] Melchers, G., N.-L. Johannesson & B. Björkman, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 17-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 805.
    Åhman Billing, Tina
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    The Female Protagonists in Thackeray’s Vanity Fair: A Corpus Linguistic Study of Keywords, Collocations, and Characterisation2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay uses corpus linguistic methods to study aspects of the novel Vanity Fair by W M Thackeray. The aim is to study the way Thackeray chose to describe his two female protagonists, Rebecca Sharp and Amelia Sedley. This is accomplished by a closer study of keywords in Vanity Fair, created by using a reference corpus consisting of thirteen novels by Victorian authors. These keywords are used to define semantic fields related to the novel. Keywords from the semantic field closest to the protagonists are studied in context. In addition, adjectives that collocate with the names of the protagonists are analyzed to compare the characterization of each woman. The study indicates that Thackeray has used fewer adjectives to describe Amelia than Rebecca, but that he has used these more frequently, which may cause readers to form a stronger mental picture of Amelia’s character sooner than they do for Rebecca’s.

  • 806.
    Åkerwall, Therese
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Neutrality in political interviews: A conversational analysis focusing on the expected neutrality provided by the interviewer2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to examine the norms of conversational behaviour expected by a journalist in political interviews and the ability to maintain objectivity or not, depending on the interaction with the political participants. The data is a transcript from a political interview in the US featuring a senior journalist and three political participants belonging to various political parties. The transcript will be analysed through conversational analysis to study the sequential patterns and content to discover non-neutral actions by the interviewer.

  • 807.
    Öhqvist, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Comparison of Authentic and Simplified Texts: A case study of Wuthering Heights 2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this essay is to explore in what way Graded Readers are different from authentic texts against the background of English as a Second Language (ESL) and the use of authentic and simplified text in ESL teaching. The material used for this purpose is the authentic text of Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë and two upper-intermediate Graded Readers from two different publishers. The study uses the software readability-score and manual analysis to examine the texts with regards to lexical choice, language structure and story. The study showed that the Graded Readers are simplified in all aspects studied. Moreover, the Graded Readers differ from each other as well, most notably in the style of the text due to sentence structure and story simplification. This could imply that different authors of Graded Readers adopt different styles when simplifying text and that the grading levels are not comparable between different publishers.

  • 808.
    Östman, Klara
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Neutral or not?: A study of gender (in)equality in the use of professional terms in English.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Jenny Cheshire, current editor in chief of

    Language in Society, stated that there is a bias of masculine terms and referents in the English language (1985, p. 22). This poses a problem, both linguistically and socially, and conscious language reforms need to be imposed in order for the bias to drastically be countered (1985, p. 22). In the past decades, gender-neutral terms, such as chairperson has been gaining ground in English, particularly in business discourse, and are contributing to create a more gender-neutral language. According to Cheshire (2008), media discourse is enormously influential (p.9) in the way we communicate, and this study investigates patterns in the use of chairperson and salesperson, as well as historically male professions priest and manager and female professions nurse and secretary. The data for this study is taken from the TIME Magazine Corpus. The results of this study show that masculine gender collocates appear commonly with the historically female professions and conversely for the historically male professions which appear more often with feminine collocates. Furthermore, through analysis of 1,000 instances of the terms in the corpus, it is noted that there are differences as to how the professions are connected with other words as well. Sexuality, nationality and physicality are ways in which the collocates of the terms differ. It is noted that, over time, there have been both increases and decreases in how gender collocates appear with the terms and that the frequency in usage of the feminine, masculine and gender-neutral terms have all been noted to vary in usage over the past century in the selected discourse.

14151617 801 - 808 of 808
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