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  • 1.
    Asgari, Hamid
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Nejadian, Kayvan Seyed
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Important Parameters in Designing and Presenting Exhibits and Planetarium Programs in Science Centers: A Visitor-Based Framework2004Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation proposes an initial framework for designing and presenting exhibits in science centers and to recommend methods for improving the educational role of planetariums in science centers.

  • 2.
    Björkroth, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Dagens museum2005In: Kulturarvens dynamik. Det institutionaliserade kulturarvet. / [ed] Aronsson, Peter; Hillström, Magdalena, Linköping: Linköpings universitet: Tema Kultur och Samhälle , 2005, p. 297-300Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    This chapter deals with a fieldwork carried out 2004 about media presentation of museums in Sweden. Which museums are the museums of today represented in media? There are small newly established and old large museums is presented side by side and the popular understanding are not necessarily the same as the professionals understanding of museums.

  • 3.
    Björkroth, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Ett nytt Sverige2005In: Dalarna 2005. En resa i tid och rum / [ed] Raihle, Jan; Ståhl, Elizabet, Falun: Dalarnas fornminnes och hembygdsförbund, Dalarnas museum , 2005, p. 23-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    This chapter deals with the history of the movement of hembygd. The rise of the popular movement is seen in the shadow of the first world war and through the dissolvent, a decade earlier of the Swedish-Norwegian union 1905.

  • 4.
    Björkroth, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Hembygd i samtid och framtid 1890—1930. En museologisk studie av att bevara och förnya. (Past, present and future : A museological study of museums and the preservation of environment in Sweden c. 1890—1930.): [Swedish with English summary.]2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    This dissertation deals with renewal on the foundation of the past, as this idea was elaborated in the establishment of community museums and car of the environmental landscape from the late 19th century to the 1930s. During that period the movement of taking care of nature, culture, and mankind increased and dispersed into national, regional and local organisations. This phenomenon is, in Sweden, called the hembygdsrörelse (hembygd is a place with special values, and rörelse means movement). The new organisations were mostly established along with existing regional museums, bat at the time toward the end of this study many of the museums and new organisations merged together. These changes indicated that the position of the past in present society had altered. The thesis consists of a main analysis of this movement (chapters 1, 2 and 8) interwoven with five different studies of the significance of preservation and renewal of the past (chapters 3—7). The first of these studies deals with different representations of history and artefacts, that was present at the turn of the century. Next the youth movement in Norway and the rise of a Swedish youth movement and their ideas of the creation of a better future are focused. The initiatives to establish popular education, Swedish Folk High Schools, that arose in the youth movement is the third subject interleaved, and similar initiative in Finland are also regarded. Then follows a presentation of the international discourse that not only takes the preservation of cultural but also natural heritage into consideration. This is also an overview of the European situation with special regard to German speaking areas. The fifth study (chapter 7) focuses on different was to exhibit, and to relate to what is exhibited. An important change in the purpose of a museum was the discovery of folk culture at the end of the 19th century. In the process of changing Sweden from a country of peasants to a nation of industrialised workers, an important part was to define a common understanding of the past. This is also a way to understand the notion of something as new. In the final chapter (9) the discussions during the 1930s are mirrored. At this time the meaning of the past in the present, and the idea of the past in future society altered. In the rising welfare society the present new past had to support the development in another way than before. The idea of renewal on the foundations of the past had lost its importance.

  • 5. Broman, Arne
    et al.
    Broman, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Museum exhibits for the conics1994In: Mathematics Magazine, ISSN 0025-570X, E-ISSN 1930-0980, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 206-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is rather common nowadays that museums, especially those of the "science center" type, have showcases where visitors can perform experiments. In the Futures' Museum in Borlänge we have made an exhibit where interested persons can construct parabolas. In this note we describe this showcase. Analogous exhibits can be made for constructing ellipses and hyperbolas.

  • 6.
    Broman, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Kommunicera vetenskap och extramuralt lärande2004In: Naturfagenes didaktikk - en disiplin i forandring / [ed] Henriksen, Ellen K; Ødegaard, Marianne, Kristiansand: Norwegian Academic Press , 2004, p. 503-516Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vetenskapscentret och planetariet är institutioner som utgår ifrån situationer till skillnad museet som utgår från föremål. Deras didaktik präglas av extramuralt lärande, interaktivitet och upplevelser. Många av dagens vetenskapscentra har som främsta målgrupp "7-Eleven" (barn mellan 7 och 11 år), och vill göra gruppen både mer intresserad av och mer kunnig i naturvetenskap och teknik. Vid Högskolan Dalarna finns en enterminskurs, Kommunicera vetenskap. Delvis inom ramen för denna har ett antal mindre studier gjorts, framför allt syftande till att undersöka i vad mån vetenskapscentra och planetarier lyckas leva upp till sina målsättningar. Studierna tyder på att det inte finns ett enhetligt resultat. Vi startar hösten 2003 en 50 veckors breddmagisterkurs i Vetenskapskommunikation. Vi avser att involvera magistrander i fortsatt forskning om extramuralt lärande.

  • 7.
    Broman, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Science in informal education1996In: Fifth Nordic Research Symposium on Didactics of Science, 1996Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The course Popular Science with Emphasis on the Didactics of Science Centers (5 cr. + 5 cr. extension) is held at Dalarna University College for the first time during the academic year 1995/96. In the present paper, basic thoughts and ideas as well as the curricula are presented. Also, some of the struggle (in Sweden and abroad) to modernize the pedagogics at science centers and museums- including "the constructivist museum" is discussed. Finally, the plans of regional networks of local science centers will be mentioned.

  • 8.
    Broman, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Solar energy exhibits at the popular science park Teknoland2000In: 7th International Symposium on Renewable Energy Education, Oslo, Norge, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The new Popular Science Park TEKNOLAND in Falun contains a number of interactive solar energy exhibits, including The Solar Heated Chess Board, The Solar Electric Playhouse, The Sudanese Solar Oven, and Solar Collector Optics. The TeknoTrix tutored children activities include solar thermal activities. Some related interactive exhibits are planned to be included during the summer and during coming years.

  • 9.
    Broman, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Solar energy studies and extramural learning2003In: ISES Solar World Congress, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extramural learning refers to the educational process that takes place outside the walls of the school (or the university). Extramural learning that takes place in a science center is characterized by hands-on and interactivity. Interactive solar energy exhibits are particularly well suited for out-door science centers. The paper presents some solar energy hands-on exhibits and extramural activities that the author has initiated and participated in.

  • 10.
    Broman, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Teknoland - popular science park with solar energy exhibits2000In: EuroSun 2000, Köpenhamn, Danmark, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The new Popular Science Park TEKNOLAND in Falun contains a number of interactive solar energy exhibits, including The Solar Heated Chess Board, The Solar Electric Playhouse, The Sudanese Solar Oven, and Solar Collector Optics. The TeknoTrix tutored children activities include solar thermal activities. Some related interactive exhibits are planned to be included during the summer and during coming years.

  • 11.
    Broman, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    The Boundless Planetarium Proceedings: IPS'90, Galaxen, Borlänge 15-19 juli 19901990Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    These Proceedings include 65 papers, grouped under the following headings: The international planetarium scene. International Planetarium Society Committee Reports. Astronomy for the planetarium. Cosmos and space in the planetarium. Didactics for the planetarium. Outside the big dome. Planetarium techniques. Planetarium management and co-operation.

  • 12.
    Broman, Lars
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Broman, Per
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Astronomical interactive exhibits2002In: 16th International Planetarium Society Conference, Wichita, KA, USA, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been shown (Franck Pettersen, Master thesis 1995) that a planetarium show has a much larger educational impact if it is accompanied by hands-on experimenting. In the present paper, a number of interactive exhibits that we have used together with Stella Nova Planetarium at Falun Science Center and at Teknoland are presented.

  • 13.
    Broman, Lars
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Gustafsson, Kjell
    A low-cost versatile solar hot water system for school laboratory work1997In: North Sun'97, Helsingfors, Finland, 1997Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A versatile low-cost solar hot water collector for school laboratory work has been constructed. It consists of a 4 dm2 absorber connected to an 80 cc storage tank. It is a complete system that works by means of thermosiphon convection of the water. A number of experiments and observations for students from kindergarden to college level are proposed.

  • 14.
    Börjesson, Petter
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Public Authorities' Use of Exhibition2004Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis studies the use of exhibitions by public authorities and the possibilities of making exhibits out of authority topics.

  • 15.
    Chariandy, Celeste Marie-Ange
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    The Impact of the NIHERST/NGC National Science Centre, Trinidad and Tobago on Visiting Student Groups2004Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to asses the impact of a visit to the NIHERST/NGC National Science Centre in Trinidad on four different school-age visitor groups. The research was conducted through the administering of a post-visit questionnaire immediately upon completion of each visit by each group, and via visitor feedback obtained in post-visit or pre-visit activities conducted within two weeks of the visit for three groups. Teachers/instructors who accompanied the groups on their visit also completed post-visit questionnaires and provided additional information on follow-up activities via an interview. The results of this investigation suggest that the visit to this science centre provided entertainment/enjoyment value and potential educational value to most individuals. The nature of this enjoyment was noted for various age groups and genders in this study. Quantification of the educational impact was not possible within the constraints of this study, which was unable to capture long-term effects of the supply of ‘new knowledge’ to visitors which the visit to the science centre had provided.

  • 16.
    Davari, Mahtab
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Comparison of learning between Digital gallery and Hands-on Laboratory2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis has been done in ROM (Royal Ontario Museum) located in Toronto Canada. It focuses on learning in two parts of the museum. It tries to find out how much each part is effective in terms of learning. Studies have been done in the Digital gallery, which has been equipped with digital video projector and workstation that allows visitors to interact with the collections in 2 or 3 dimensional spaces while they are watching the presenting film. The rest of the study was in Hands-on laboratory, which allows students to examine artifacts and discuss their findings . The method was used in this research is Concept mapping . In Digital gallery, 24 schools surveys in the form of pre-post- test by help of the concept mapping method has been done. In Hands-on laboratory, 12 schools have been studied by using the combination of interviewing and written pre post-test of concept mapping.

  • 17.
    Engdahl, Lottie
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    An Evaluation of ”Middle Ages Dead or Live?” The first interactive exhibition at the National Museum of History2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study conducted at, and for, the National Museum of History in Stockholm. The aim of the study was to confirm or disconfirm the hypothesis that visitors in a traditional museum environment might not take part in interactivity in an interactive exhibition. And if they do the visitors might skip the texts and objects on display. To answer this and other questions a multiple method was used. Both non participant observations and exit interviews were conducted. After a description of the interactive exhibits, theory of knowledge and learning is presented before the gathered data is presented. All together 443 visitors were observed. In the observations the visitors were timed on how much time they spent in the room, the time spent on the interactivity, texts and objects. In the 40 interviews information about visitors’ participation in the interactivity was gathered. What interactivity the visitor found easiest, hardest, funniest and most boring. The result did not confirm the hypothesis. All kinds of visitors, children and adults, participated in the interactivities. The visitors took part in the texts and objects and the interactive exhibits.

  • 18.
    Göthberg, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    NAVET's Boxes - an Evaluation of the Post-Visit Loan Service at a Science Centre in Borås2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Many pedagogues believe science centres to be a good complement to the more formal school teaching. For a visit to a science centre to be as educational as possible, there is a need for pre-visit information of some sort, a guided visit, and post-visit work. Many science centres offer loan services of different kinds. At Navet, a science centre in Borås, teachers can borrow boxes with experiments connected to the different themes they provide. The experiments are supposed to be a continuation of the visit and help settle the knowledge gained during the visit. This thesis is an evaluation of how the boxes function in the schools, and what the teachers think of them. The study was conducted through questionnaires and interviews with both teachers and the staff at Navet. The results of the study are very positive. Many teachers have been involved with Navet from the very beginning and they see a visit to Navet as an integrated part of their teaching. Some boxes work better than others and some might need clearer information, but overall the teachers see the boxes as timesavers, as a way to vary their teaching more easily, and as a help for teachers not specialized in mathematics and science.

  • 19.
    Islam, Md. Khademul
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Pupils' interaction with a Science Centre: Communication perspective analysis2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pupils’ knowledge about science and what role science center is playing as a medium of communication to increase knowledge among students. This study also tried to find out pupils’ interaction: how they use science center as a source of scientific information, what they learn from their visit to a science center, their pattern of communication with it. This project also measured attraction, holding and learning power of exhibits of the science center at Dalarna University in Borlänge and learning power of planetarium program and slide show of Stella Nova Planetarium at Dalarna University. The subjects of this study consisted of students of class seven and eight and teachers of an urban school in Borlänge, Sweden. To find out students’ learning in a science center a pre and post visit test were conducted through questionnaires. Interview method by questionnaires was also used to explore pupils’ interaction with science center. The results of this study show that students learn by their visit to a science center but learning was not statistically significant (0.05).Girls learnt better than boys. School classes that have better pre-knowledge about science before a visit to a science center learnt worse than other classes having less pre-knowledge. Girls and boys interact with a science center in different ways. Science center is playing important role as a science communicator.

  • 20.
    Keilman, Thomas
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Experiencing Science in Action: The Use of Exhibition Techniques in Guided Tours to a Scientific Laboratory2004Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The current paper presents a study conducted at CERN, Switzerland, to investigate visitors' and tour guides' use and appreciation of existing panels at visit itinerary points. The results were used to develop a set of recommendations for constructing optimal panels to assist the guides' explanation.

  • 21.
    Lebel, Josée
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Tapping into Floor Staff: Using the knowledge of floor staff to conduct formative evaluations of exhibits in a Canadian science centre2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Most science centres in Canada employ science-educated floor staff to motivate visitorsto have fun while enhancing the educational reach of the exhibits. Although bright andsensitive to visitors’ needs, floor staff are rarely consulted in the planning,implementation, and modification phases of an exhibit. Instead, many developmentteams rely on costly third-party evaluations or skip the front-end and formativeevaluations all together, leading to costly errors that could have been avoided. This studywill seek to reveal a correlation between floor staff’s perception of visitors’ interactionswith an exhibit and visitors’ actual experiences. If a correlation exists, a recommendationcould be made to encourage planning teams to include floor staff in the formative andsummative evaluations of an exhibit. This is especially relevant to science centres withlimited budgets and for whom a divide exists between floor staff and management.In this study, a formative evaluation of one exhibit was conducted, measuring both floorstaff’s perceptions of the visitor experience and visitors’ own perceptions of the exhibit.Floor staff were then trained on visitor evaluation methods. A week later, floor staff andvisitors were surveyed a second time on a different exhibit to determine whether anincrease in accuracy existed.The training session increased the specificity of the motivation and comprehensionresponses and the enthusiasm of the staff, but not their ability to predict observedbehaviours with respect to ergonomics, learning indicators, holding power, and successrates. The results revealed that although floor staff underestimated visitors’ success ratesat the exhibits, staff accurately predicted visitors’ behaviours with respect to holdingpower, ergonomics, learning indicators, motivation and comprehension, both before andafter the staff training.

  • 22.
    Lundberg, Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Citizens and Contemporary Science Ways to dialogue in science centre contexts.2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The current paper presents a study conducted at At-Bristol Science Centre, UK. It is a front-end evaluation for the “Live Science Zone” at At-Bristol, which will be built during the autumn of 2004. It will provide a facility for programmed events and shows, non-programmed investigative activities and the choice of passive or active exploration of current scientific topics. The main aim of the study is to determine characteristics of what kind of techniques to use in the Live Science Zone. The objectives are to explore what has already been done at At-Bristol, and what has been done at other science centres, and to identify successful devices. The secondary aim is mapping what sorts of topics that visitors are actually interested in debating. The methods used in the study are deep qualitative interviews with professionals working within the field of science communication in Europe and North America, and questionnaires answered by visitors to At-Bristol. The results show that there are some gaps between the intentions of the professionals and the opinions of the visitors, in terms of opportunities and willingness for dialogue in science centre activities. The most popular issue was Future and the most popular device was Film.

  • 23.
    Markussen, Anny
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Maximizing the outcome for teenagers visiting a Science Center - with an application to Digital Technology2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    I have asked teenagers (15 to 17 years old) which part of a science centre they liked the most and by analysing the answers I have seen that they prefer “body-on” and very open exhibits. These results combined with a front-end evaluation about children’s pre-knowledge about Digital Technology renders some recommendations when planning new exhibits. The front-end evaluation showed that the word “Digital Technology” did not really mean anything to children but they were very interested in the subject when asked more specifically. It also shows that girls care more about the historical and health aspects of science than boys. For both genders, the curiosity in technology is low if not initiated by something spectacular.

  • 24.
    Martin, Claudette
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Examining Visitor Attitudes and Motivations at a Space Science Centre2004Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The H.R. MacMillan Space Centre is a multi-faceted organization whose mission is to educate, inspire and evoke a sense of wonder about the universe, our planet and space exploration. As a popular, Vancouver science centre, it faces the same range of challenges and issues as other major attractions: how does the Space Centre maintain a healthy public attendance in an increasingly competitive market where visitors continue to be presented with an increasingly rich range of choices for their leisure spending and entertainment dollars? This front-end study investigated visitor attitudes, thoughts and preconceptions on the topic of space and astronomy. It also examined visitors’ motivations for coming to a space science centre. Useful insights were obtained which will be applied to improve future programme content and exhibit development.

  • 25.
    Mõistus, Kristel
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Pupils' Interaction with the Exhibits According to the Learning Behaviour Model2004Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Science centres are one of the best opportunities for informal study of natural science. There are many advantages to learn in the science centres compared with the traditional methods: it is possible to motivate and supply visitors with the social experience, to improve people’s understandings and attitudes, thereby bringing on and attaching wider interest towards natural science. In the science centres, pupils show interest, enthusiasm, motivation, self-confidence, sensitiveness and also they are more open and eager to learn. Traditional school-classes however mostly do not favour these capabilities. This research presents the qualitative study in the science centre. Data was gathered from observations and interviews at Science North science centre in Canada. Pupils’ learning behaviours were studied at different exhibits in the science centre. Learning behaviours are classified as follows: labels reading, experimenting with the exhibits, observing others or exhibit, using guide, repeating the activity, positive emotional response, acknowledged relevance, seeking and sharing information. In this research, it became clear that in general pupils do not read labels; in most cases pupils do not use the guides help; pupils prefer exhibits that enable high level of interactivity; pupils display more learning behaviours at exhibits that enable a high level of interactivity.

  • 26.
    Salewski, Katja
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Museum Personalized: The impact of floor staff on an exhibition - A holistic approach2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The current paper presents a study conducted at The National Museum of Science and Technology in Stockholm to investigate the exhibition “Antarctica – that’s cool” from its first concept to the first workshop that is held in the exhibition. The focus is on the influence of floor staff on an exhibition and workshops as learning facilities in museums. Findings, based on visitor observation and the exhibition building process, go into the characteristics of low-budget productions and discuss the importance of staff on the exhibition floor for museums as life-long learning facilities. The holistic approach of the study provides deep insights into the complex interplay of visitors, staff and exhibitions. The results can be used for future exhibition building processes and educational programs in museums and should strengthen the museum’s position as life-long learning facility in nowadays society.

  • 27.
    Seitei, Gloria Tiny
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Front End Evaluation of 'Tester' Exhibition to be Developed into a Travelling Sports Exhibition2004Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this evaluation is to develop a framework that will help in planning and implementing the mobile sport exhibition, increase visitor satisfaction and aid At Bristol in building successful exhibits. The evaluation mainly focuses on visitor interaction with exhibits. It is believed that learning does occur in science centres and museums. The evaluation will therefore find out if learning occurs in the Sports exhibition and if so, the nature of the learning outcomes. The evaluation also discusses advantages and disadvantages of travelling exhibitions and identifies the characteristics of good exhibits that form the basis of the framework. From the results, an indication is that children make the larger proportion of visitors to Sportastic. Their age ranges, under 10 and 10 to 15 years constituted 21% and 30% respectively. The three most enjoyed exhibits are the Sprint Challenge (running), BATAK (test your reaction and Hot Shots (football). Visitors say these exhibits are enjoyed because they are fun, competitive, entertaining, interactive and hands-on. Skateboard Challenge and Skeleton Bob are among the exhibits least enjoyed since they are reported to be boring and uncomfortable to use. The learning outcomes from the exhibits are; increased knowledge about balancing, reaction, pulse and strength.

  • 28.
    Zhang, Ning
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Science communication.
    Science is Primary - Children Thinking and Learning in the Chemistry Laboratory2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of primary science education is to foster children’s interest, develop positive science attitudes and promote science process skills development. Learning by playing and discovering provides several opportunities for children to inquiry and understand science based on the first–hand experience. The current research was conducted in the children’s laboratory in Heureka, the Finnish science centre. Young children (aged 7 years) which came from 4 international schools did a set of chemistry experiments in the laboratory. From the results of the cognitive test, the pre-test, the post-test, supported by observation and interview, we could make the conclusion that children enjoyed studying in the laboratory. Chemistry science was interesting and fascinating for young children; no major gender differences were found between boys and girls learning in the science laboratory. Lab work not only encouraged children to explore and investigate science, but also stimulated children’s cognitive development.

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