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  • 1. Aarnio, A
    et al.
    Johansson, Sverker
    Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, Högskolan i Jönköping, HLK, Ämnesforskning.
    Measurement of the mass and width of the Zo particle from multihadron final states produced in e+e--annihilations1989In: Physics Letters, no 231, p. p 539-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Aarnio, A
    et al.
    Johansson, Sverker
    Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, Högskolan i Jönköping, HLK, Ämnesforskning.
    Study of the hadronic decays of the Zo boson1990In: Physics Letters, no 240, p. p 271-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Aarnio, A
    et al.
    Johansson, Sverker
    Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation, Högskolan i Jönköping, HLK, Ämnesforskning.
    Study of the leptonic decays of the Zo boson1990In: Physics Letters, no 241, p. p 425-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Aartsen, Marja
    et al.
    Valtorta, Nicole
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    van Regenmortel, Sofie
    Waldegrave, Charles
    Corrigan, Trudy
    Exclusion from social relations in later life: Briefing paper2018Report (Other academic)
  • 5. Aasheim, V
    et al.
    Waldenström, U
    Hjelmstedt, A
    Rasmussen, S
    Pettersson, H
    Schytt, Erica
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress in primiparous women, from early pregnancy to 18 months postpartum2012In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 119, no 9, p. 1108-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Please cite this paper as: Aasheim V, Waldenström U, Hjelmstedt A, Rasmussen S, Pettersson H, Schytt E. Associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress in primiparous women, from early pregnancy to 18 months postpartum. BJOG 2012;119:1108-1116. Objective  To investigate if advanced maternal age at first birth increases the risk of psychological distress during pregnancy at 17 and 30 weeks of gestation and at 6 and 18 months after birth. Design  National cohort study. Setting  Norway. Sample  A total of 19 291 nulliparous women recruited between 1999 and 2008 from hospitals and maternity units. Methods  Questionnaire data were obtained from the longitudinal Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, and register data from the national Medical Birth Register. Advanced maternal age was defined as ≥32 years and a reference group of women aged 25-31 years was used for comparisons. The distribution of psychological distress from 20 to ≥40 years was investigated, and the prevalence of psychological distress at the four time-points was estimated. Logistic regression analyses based on generalised estimation equations were used to investigate associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress. Main outcome measures  Psychological distress measured by SCL-5. Results  Women of advanced age had slightly higher scores of psychological distress over the period than the reference group, also after controlling for obstetric and infant variables. The youngest women had the highest scores. A history of depression increased the risk of distress in all women. With no history of depression, women of advanced age were not at higher risk. Changes over time were similar between groups and lowest at 6 months. Conclusion  Women of 32 years and beyond had slightly increased risk of psychological distress during pregnancy and the first 18 months of motherhood compared with women aged 25-31 years.

  • 6. Abarca-Goméz, Leandra
    et al.
    Abdeen, Ziad A
    Abdul Hamid, Zargar
    Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M
    Acosta-Cazares, Benjamin
    Acuin, Cecilia
    Adams, Robert J
    Aekplakorn, Wichai
    Forsner, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Ezzati, Majid
    Worldwide trends in body-mass index, underweight, overweight, and obesity from 1975 to 2016: a pooled analysis of 2416 population-based measurement studies in 128·9 million children, adolescents, and adults.2017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 390, no 10113, p. 2627-2642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Underweight, overweight, and obesity in childhood and adolescence are associated with adverse health consequences throughout the life-course. Our aim was to estimate worldwide trends in mean body-mass index (BMI) and a comprehensive set of BMI categories that cover underweight to obesity in children and adolescents, and to compare trends with those of adults.

    METHODS: We pooled 2416 population-based studies with measurements of height and weight on 128·9 million participants aged 5 years and older, including 31·5 million aged 5-19 years. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2016 in 200 countries for mean BMI and for prevalence of BMI in the following categories for children and adolescents aged 5-19 years: more than 2 SD below the median of the WHO growth reference for children and adolescents (referred to as moderate and severe underweight hereafter), 2 SD to more than 1 SD below the median (mild underweight), 1 SD below the median to 1 SD above the median (healthy weight), more than 1 SD to 2 SD above the median (overweight but not obese), and more than 2 SD above the median (obesity).

    FINDINGS: Regional change in age-standardised mean BMI in girls from 1975 to 2016 ranged from virtually no change (-0·01 kg/m2 per decade; 95% credible interval -0·42 to 0·39, posterior probability [PP] of the observed decrease being a true decrease=0·5098) in eastern Europe to an increase of 1·00 kg/m2 per decade (0·69-1·35, PP>0·9999) in central Latin America and an increase of 0·95 kg/m2 per decade (0·64-1·25, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. The range for boys was from a non-significant increase of 0·09 kg/m2 per decade (-0·33 to 0·49, PP=0·6926) in eastern Europe to an increase of 0·77 kg/m2 per decade (0·50-1·06, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. Trends in mean BMI have recently flattened in northwestern Europe and the high-income English-speaking and Asia-Pacific regions for both sexes, southwestern Europe for boys, and central and Andean Latin America for girls. By contrast, the rise in BMI has accelerated in east and south Asia for both sexes, and southeast Asia for boys. Global age-standardised prevalence of obesity increased from 0·7% (0·4-1·2) in 1975 to 5·6% (4·8-6·5) in 2016 in girls, and from 0·9% (0·5-1·3) in 1975 to 7·8% (6·7-9·1) in 2016 in boys; the prevalence of moderate and severe underweight decreased from 9·2% (6·0-12·9) in 1975 to 8·4% (6·8-10·1) in 2016 in girls and from 14·8% (10·4-19·5) in 1975 to 12·4% (10·3-14·5) in 2016 in boys. Prevalence of moderate and severe underweight was highest in India, at 22·7% (16·7-29·6) among girls and 30·7% (23·5-38·0) among boys. Prevalence of obesity was more than 30% in girls in Nauru, the Cook Islands, and Palau; and boys in the Cook Islands, Nauru, Palau, Niue, and American Samoa in 2016. Prevalence of obesity was about 20% or more in several countries in Polynesia and Micronesia, the Middle East and north Africa, the Caribbean, and the USA. In 2016, 75 (44-117) million girls and 117 (70-178) million boys worldwide were moderately or severely underweight. In the same year, 50 (24-89) million girls and 74 (39-125) million boys worldwide were obese.

    INTERPRETATION: The rising trends in children's and adolescents' BMI have plateaued in many high-income countries, albeit at high levels, but have accelerated in parts of Asia, with trends no longer correlated with those of adults.

    FUNDING: Wellcome Trust, AstraZeneca Young Health Programme.

  • 7. Abbas, A.
    et al.
    Avdic, Anders
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Xiaobao, P.
    Zhao, S. L.
    Chong, R.
    Strategic framework of collaboration in knowledge transfer of high-tech industries2018In: Quality - Access to Success, ISSN 1582-2559, E-ISSN 2069-2242, Vol. 19, no 163, p. 74-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Abbas, A.
    et al.
    Faiz, A.
    Fatima, A.
    Avdic, Anders
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems. Örebro University.
    Reasons for the failure of government IT projects in Pakistan: A contemporary study2017In: 2017 International Conference on Service Systems and Service Management, IEEE conference proceedings, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After the introduction of information technology (IT), the government needs to take the initiative to start IT projects for the automation of government process to the citizen. Statistics show that a high number of government IT projects fail and only 15 percent e-government projects are successful. In this study, we will answer this research question, what are the reasons for failure of IT projects in the government sector organization in Pakistan and how to overcome these issues? This research was conducted through a literature review, 20 articles from journals and conferences were selected through keywords for the period of ten years from 2003 to 2013. For suggestions, we have followed the same structured search procedure. We found and select articles with our keywords, after reading abstract and conclusion. Our study has described four factors for the failure of IT projects in government sector organizations in Pakistan. These factors are Technology, Management, Politics and Finance. The technology factor can be reduced by providing latest ICT infrastructure with an expert to run and maintain it. Management issues can be resolved by hiring an experienced, skilled and highly motivated project manager to complete a project successfully. Government should make new laws and regulations to help the implementation of these projects and bureaucracy should eliminate any power struggle during and after the implementation. The budget should be allocated before the start of the project to complete it on time. Our research study has provided guidelines to policy makers for automation of government organizations in Pakistan. By considering these suggestions, successful government projects can be achieved.

  • 9. Abbas, Asad
    et al.
    Anam, Fatima
    Sunguh, Khavwandiza
    Avdic, Anders
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Zhang, Xuehe
    Digital rights management system in China: Challenges and Opportunities2018In: Journal of Cases on Information Technology, ISSN 1548-7717, E-ISSN 1548-7725, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Abbas, Asad
    et al.
    School of Public Affairs, University of Science and Technology of China.
    Avdic, Anders
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Chong, Ren
    School of Public Affairs, University of Science and Technology of China.
    Framework of Collaboration in Knowledge Transfer of High Technology Industries2018In: Quality - Access to Success, ISSN 1582-2559, E-ISSN 2069-2242, Vol. 19, no 163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The concept of Triple Helix relates to collaboration between universities, governments and industry. Such collaboration can take different forms in different countries. This paper examines collaboration between universities and industry in China, specifically in the city of Hefei in Anhui province, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the country. In so doing, it seeks to address the research question: How does industry collaborate with universities in order to acquire commercialized knowledge?

    Design/ Methodology/ Approach - The study is qualitative, based on interviews with experts in R & D, and Intellectual Property Rights from high-tech companies based in Hefei. We analyzed our findings using a conceptual framework that focuses on Knowledge Transfer and Innovation Diffusion (Liyanage et al, 2012). Our study describes and discusses the entire process, from an initial awareness of new knowledge to its eventual acquisition.

    Findings and implications - We conclude that Chinese high-tech companies design comprehensive strategies for the acquisition of knowledge generated from external sources. These strategies are based on local, provincial and state government industrial policies that aim to support collaboration with universities and implement external knowledge in existing systems.

    Originality - Commercialized knowledge put into practice by industries for their own innovation and commercial purposes.

    Limitation - We interviewed industrial experts from three high-tech companies in the city of Hefei, which is located in an industrial area of Anhui province.

  • 11.
    Abbas, Asad
    et al.
    School of Public Affairs, University of Science and Technology of China.
    Avdic, Anders
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Chang Barker, Katherine
    School of Public Affairs, University of Science and Technology of China.
    Xiaobao, Peng
    School of Public Affairs, University of Science and Technology of China.
    Process of knowledge transfer from universities to industry through the University of Technology Transfer Offices in China: The case of Anhui province2018In: Science and Innovation, ISSN 2409-9066, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 5-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. This paper focuses on knowledge generation and the way in which it is transferred from universities to industry. Most well reputed universities have several departments and university-run enterprises that engage in research. The purpose of these research units is to help universities provide breakthrough innovation through the generation of new knowledge.

    Problem Statement. For this we chose to study China's University Technology Transfer Offices (UTTOs) to gather concrete evidence of university knowledge generation for commercial use in industry. The objective of this study is get indepth information about the role of UTTOs in the transfer of such knowledge.Purpose. The generation of new knowledge contributes to the field of science and technology; in turn, industry can use this knowledge to produce new innovative products or improve existing ones. This study aims to identify the process of knowledge transfer from universities to industry in China.

    Materials and Methods. Our study was carried out as a qualitative case study in the Anhui province of China. Data was mainly collected through semi-structured interviews with technology transfer experts working in technology transfer offices. Collected data were analyzed using a knowledge transfer model with six phases: 1) awareness, 2) acquisition, 3) transformation, 4) association, 5) application, and 6) feedback.

    Results. In China, universities and their research groups dominate in the generation and commercialization of research results, with UTTOs acting as technology bridges between the two parties, as well as providing legal and business services.

    Conclusions. This paper contributes by offering a detailed description of the knowledge transfer process and specifically the role and activities of UTTOs. This research also helps Chinese and international researchers currently carrying out research on the technology transfer process in China.

  • 12. Abbas, Asad
    et al.
    Avdic, Anders
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Xiaobao, Peng
    Ming, Wan
    University-government collaboration for the generation and commercialization of new knowledge for use in industry2019In: Journal of Innovation & Knowledge, ISSN 2444-569X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 23-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of Triple Helix relates to collaboration between universities, governments and industry. Such collaboration can take different forms in different countries. This paper describes collaboration between universities and government in China, specifically in the city of Hefei in Anhui province, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the country. The research question is: How can bi-lateral research collaboration be a source of knowledge generation and commercialization for use in industry?

    The study is qualitative, involving individual and group interviews with university team leaders and team members from successful projects. Government representatives in China were also interviewed. We used the SECI knowledge creation method to analyze the findings. We also describe the collaboration process from idea and application through to review, funding, realization and commercialization. Our study shows that the government in China plays a dominant role in the process of knowledge creation and commercialization. We conclude that collaboration is a source of new knowledge generation and that the government plays a key role by funding universities and creating a research environment that meets the policy requirements of industry today. In particular, we show that universities and their research groups use resources, such as skilled manpower, laboratories and equipment, to accomplish tasks within a set timeframe.

  • 13.
    Abdelzadeh, Ali
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Amnå, Erik
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Lundberg, Erik
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    En arena för tillit och tolerans?2016In: Föreningen, jaget och laget: 7 perspektiv påmidrotrens  demokratiska effekter, Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning , 2016, p. 27-46Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Abdelzadeh, Ali
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Lundberg, Erik
    Ersta Sköndal högskola, Institutionen för socialvetenskap.
    Solid or Flexible?: Social Trust from Early Adolescence to Young Adulthood2017In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 207-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The belief that people are generally fair and trustworthy has generated plenty of scholarly attention in recent decades, particularly in the Scandinavian countries, which are often known for high levels of social trust. This article draws attention to the current discussion in the literature on whether social trust is a stable cultural trait marked by persistence or is based on experiences and subject to change throughout life. Based on unique longitudinal data from five different cohorts of young people in Sweden, ranging in age from 13 to 28 years, this article provides an empirical contribution on how social trust develops over time. The results show that there is a greater degree of instability in social trust between 13 and 15 years of age than in other age groups, and that social trust appears to stabilize with age. Findings also indicate that there are substantial inter-individual differences in social trust among young people within the same age group, both in initial levels and in the rates of change over time. The article concludes that although social trust is relatively stable it tends to crystallize in early adulthood, highlighting the relevance of the impressionable-years hypothesis.

  • 15.
    Abdelzadeh, Ali
    et al.
    Myndigheten för ungdoms- och civilsamhällesfrågor (MUCF).
    Lundberg, Erik
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Tolerance and other citizen competencies2017In: Mechanisms of tolerance: an anthology / [ed] Erik Lundberg, Stockholm: Forum för levande historia , 2017, p. 149-176Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Abdelzadeh, Ali
    et al.
    MUCF - Myndigheten för ungdoms- och civilsamhällesfrågor.
    Lundberg, Erik
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Tolerans och andra medborgarkompetenser2017In: Toleransens mekanismer: En antologi / [ed] Lundberg, Erik, Stockholm: Forum för levande historia , 2017, p. 145-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17. Abdillahi, Hamda A
    et al.
    Hassan, Khadra A
    Kiruja, Jonah
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Egal, Jama A
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    A mixed-methods study of maternal near miss and death after emergency cesarean delivery at a referral hospital in Somaliland2017In: International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, ISSN 0020-7292, E-ISSN 1879-3479, Vol. 138, no 1, p. 119-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore maternal near miss and death after emergency cesarean delivery in Somaliland, including the impact of the prerequisite for family consent.

    METHODS: A facility-based, mixed-methods study was conducted to assess all maternal near misses and deaths recorded at a referral hospital that provided services to women from all regions of Somaliland. The data sources comprised a quantitative prospective cross-sectional study using the WHO near-miss tool (performed from August 1 to December 31, 2015) and qualitative interviews with 17 healthcare providers working at the referral hospital who were in direct contact with the women in labor (performed from January 15 to March 15, 2015).

    RESULTS: Of the 138 maternal near misses and deaths recorded, 50 (36%) were associated with emergency cesarean delivery. The most frequent maternal complication was severe pre-eclampsia (n=17; 34%), and the most frequent underlying causes were hypertensive disorders (n=31; 62%) and obstetric hemorrhage (n=15; 30%). Healthcare providers were often prevented from performing emergency cesarean delivery until the required consent had been received from the woman's extended family.

    CONCLUSION: Maternity care in Somaliland must be improved, and the issue of legal authority for consent examined, to ensure both safe and timely provision of emergency cesarean delivery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Abelin, Åsa
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Thorén, Bosse
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    The Perceptual Weight of Word Stress, Quantity and Tonal Word Accent in Swedish2017In: Phonology in Protolanguage and Interlanguage / [ed] Elena Babatsouli and David Ingram, Equinox Publishing, 2017, p. 316-341Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When teaching the pronunciation of an additional language, the teacher should know which properties to give high priority and which to give lower priority. The present study aims at ranking the perceptual weight among the three phonemic prosodic contrasts of Swedish, namely word stress, quantity and tonal word accent. In two experiments, native Swedish subjects were presented with several disyllabic sequences; intact words, nonsense words and words that were distorted with respect to the three prosodic contrasts. The distorted words were not members of minimal pairs. In addition to intact words and non-word distractors, subjects heard originally trochaic words pronounced with iambic stress pattern and vice versa, originally /VːC/ words pronounced as /VCː/ and originally accent I words pronounced with accent II and vice versa. Listeners should decide whether the words were real words or not. The result shows that words with changed word accent category were rather easy to identify, words with changed stress pattern harder to identify, and changed quantity category caused most problems.

  • 19.
    Abelin, Åsa
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Thorén, Bosse
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    The relative perceptual weight of two Swedish prosodic contrasts2015In: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Monolingual and Bilingual Speech 2015 / [ed] Elena Babatsouli, David Ingram, Chania 73100, Greece: Institute of Monolingual and Bilingual Speech , 2015, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. In addition to 9 vowel and 18 consonant phonemes, Swedish has three prosodic phonemic contrasts: word stress, quantity and tonal word accent. There are also examples of distinctive phrase or sentence stress, where a verb can be followed by either an unstressed preposition or a stressed particle. This study focuses on word level and more specifically on word stress and tonal word accent in disyllabic words. When making curriculums for second language learners, teachers are helped by knowing which phonetic or phonological features are more or less crucial for the intelligibility of speech and there are some structural and anecdotal evidence that word stress should play a more important role for intelligibility of Swedish, than the tonal word accent. The Swedish word stress is about prominence contrasts between syllables, mainly signaled by syllable duration, while the tonal word accent is signaled mainly by pitch contour. The word stress contrast, as in armen [´arːmən] ‘the arm’ - armén [ar´meːn] ‘the army’, the first word trochaic and the second iambic, is present in all regional varieties of Swedish, and realized with roughly the same acoustic cues, while the tonal word accent, as in anden [´anːdən] ‘the duck’ - anden [`anːdən] ‘the spirit’ is absent in some dialects (as well as in singing), and also signaled with a variety of tonal patterns depending on region. The present study aims at comparing the respective perceptual weight of the two mentioned contrasts. Two lexical decision tests were carried out where in total 34 native Swedish listeners should decide whether a stimulus was a real word or a non-word. Real words of all mentioned categories were mixed with nonsense words and words that were mispronounced with opposite stress pattern or opposite tonal word accent category. The results show that distorted word stress caused more non-word judgments and more loss, than distorted word accent. Our conclusion is that intelligibility of Swedish is more sensitive to distorted word stress pattern than to distorted tonal word accent pattern. This is in compliance with the structural arguments presented above, and also with our own intuition.

  • 20.
    Abelin, Åsa
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Thorén, Bosse
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    What affects recognition most – wrong wordstress or wrong word accent?2015In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2015, Lund University, Sweden / [ed] Malin Svensson Lundmark, Gilbert Ambrazaitis and Joost van de Weijer, 2015, Vol. 55, p. 7-10Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an attempt to find out which of the two Swedish prosodic contrasts of 1) wordstress pattern and 2) tonal word accent category has the greatest communicative weight, a lexical decision experiment was conducted: in one part word stress pattern was changed from trochaic to iambic, and in the other part trochaic accentII words were changed to accent I.Native Swedish listeners were asked to decide whether the distorted words werereal words or ‘non-words’. A clear tendency is that listeners preferred to give more‘non-word’ responses when the stress pattern was shifted, compared to when wordaccent category was shifted. This could have implications for priority of phonological features when teaching Swedish as a second language.

  • 21. Abellan, A.
    et al.
    Perez, J.
    Pujol, R.
    Sundstrom, G.
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Malmberg, B.
    Partner care, gender equality, and ageing in Spain and Sweden2017In: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, ISSN 1652-8670, E-ISSN 1652-8670, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 69-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used national surveys to study how older persons’ changing household patterns influence the gender balance of caregiving in two countries with distinct household structures and cultures, Spain and Sweden. In both countries, men and women provide care equally often for their partner in couple-only households. This has become the most common household type among older persons in Spain and prevails altogether in Sweden. This challenges the traditional dominance of young or middle-aged women as primary caregivers in Spain. In Sweden, many caregivers are old themselves. We focus attention to partners as caregivers and the consequences of changing household structures for caregiving, which may be on the way to gender equality in both countries, with implications for families and for the public services.

  • 22.
    Abrahams, J P
    University of the Western Cape.
    Sentiment and the Spread of A Human Rights Culture2003In: Building a Human Rights Culture: South African and Swedish Perspectives / [ed] Karin Sporre & H Russel Botman, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2003, p. 274-287Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23. Abrahams, Jacobus
    et al.
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    The dental hygienist, the key person in the future team?2003In: Swiss Dental Hygienists and Swiss Society of Periodontology Congress, St Gallen, Schweiz, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Abrahamsson, Bengt
    Arbetslivscentrum, Stockholm.
    Det gick som det gick. Om inre logik, särskilt i organisationer1994In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 3-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whatever happened, happened. Some notes on inner logic, especially in organizations

    The notion that social events partly arise as a consequence of inner logic, i.e. that patterns and structures emerge outside of, or even in opposition against, plans and goals is a common element in social science. Inner logic is a summary term for social processes developing autonomously, i.e. without any individual or group intending them. Organizations quite often contain inner-logic processes. If, as this author maintains, fruitful organization theory has to build on rationalistic assumptions, how then do we handle instances of inner logic? A first step may be to break up the traditional link between structuralism and functionalism, maintaining the former and rejecting the latter. Organizations are intentionally dynamic, i.e. depend on order and predictability. To the extent that inner-logic processes appear in organizations, they should be analysed as confrontations between opposing rationalities rather than as spontaneous reactions of a ”system” . Also, frequently recurring organizational forms such as hierarchy are more fruitfully regarded as e.g. transaction-cost outcomes rather than as functional responses to system needs. Rationalism and structuralism are compatible, rationalism and functionalism are not.

  • 25.
    Abrahamsson, Hans
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Dialog och medskapande i vår tids stora samhällsomdaning2015In: Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, ISSN 2001-4554, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 20-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Great Transformation of our time, amalgamating the local with the global demands new modes of governance and management. Increased variety and diversity of the population as well as the complexity of social issues are changing the prerequisites of social sustainability. The aim of this article is to discuss how this transformation strengthens the importance of citizens’ co-creation as regards identification of the problems, measures to be taken as well as the implementation of the same. The article furthermore discusses the role of trans-disciplinary knowledge production and its possible contribution to a socially sustainable development, as well as how current modes of governance influence the room for manoeuver and conditions for co-creation. Three mental shifts are considered necessary. The first relates to the importance of viewing city residents as citizens with rights and responsibilities and not only as customers and consumers. The second concerns the shift of the view what knowledge is and what it could be and the third relates to how the question of power should be conceptualized.

  • 26. Abrahamsson, K
    et al.
    Almståhl, A
    Andersson, P
    Johannsen, A
    Rolandsson, M
    Ståhlnacke, K
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Swedish Dental Hygienists and Oral Health Research2010In: 18th International Symposium on Dental Hygiene, Glasgow, Skottland, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27. Abrahamsson, Kajsa
    et al.
    Stenman, Jane
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Attitudes to dental hygienists: Evaluation of The Dental Hygienist Beliefs Survey in a Swedish population of patients and students2007In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 5, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Abrahamsson, Kajsa
    et al.
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Dental beliefs: factor structure of the revised dental beliefs survey in a group of regular dental patients2009In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 117, no 6, p. 720-727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure of the revised dental beliefs survey (DBS-R) in a group of regular dental patients. The study group consisted of 278 patients (mean age 54 yr), 61% of whom were women. The DBS-R item mean value was 1.6. Principal component analysis (PCA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were performed. The initial PCA among the 28 DBS-R items showed four factors with eigenvalues of > 1 explaining 67% of the total variance. Five different CFA models were tested. The final model revealed a four-factor solution with one second-order factor (i.e. a hierarchical CFA). Thus, the latent second-order variable, 'dental beliefs', explains the variance from all DBS-R items through the four first-order factors labeled 'ethics', 'belittlement', 'communication and empathy', and 'control and anxiety'. The results suggest a somewhat different factor structure of DBS-R than previously reported for dental-fear patients. Hence, the underlying factor structure of the DBS-R may differ between different patient groups. The results point towards the use of the original 28-item DBS-R and interpreting the scale as measuring an overall construct of 'dental beliefs' and thus patients' attitudes and feelings related to dentists and dentistry.

  • 29. Abrahamsson, KH
    et al.
    Hakeberg, M
    Stenman, J
    Öhrn, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Health and Caring Sciences/Oral Health Science.
    Dental beliefs: evaluation of the Swedish version of the revised Dental Beliefs Survey in different patient groups and in a non-clinical student sample2006In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 114, p. 209-215Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Kön görs även i moderna organisationer2004In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 3-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31. Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Al- Jurjani's Theory of Poetic Imagery1979Book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Arabic.
    al-Sūnaytāt aw al-tawāshīḥ al-kāmilah: bi-al-lughatayn al-ʻArabīyah wa-al-Inklīzīyah2012Book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Arabic.
    الأدب العجائبي والعالم الغرائبي: في كتاب العظمة وفن السرد العربي2007Book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Arabic.
    السذاجة العربيةفي مواجهة الدهاء الأوروبي2011In: الحياةArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35. Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    جماليات التجاور: أو تشابك الفضاءات الإبداعية1998Book (Other academic)
  • 36. Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    عذابات المتنبي: في صحبة كمال أبو ديب والعكس بالعكس 201 هجرية ـ2001 ميلادية1996Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Arabic.
    قليلا من العقل يا سورية2011In: القدس العربيArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Abu-Deeb, Kamal
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Arabic.