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  • 1. Afshin, A
    et al.
    Forouzanfar, M. H
    Reitsma, M. B
    Sur, P
    Estep, K
    Lee, A
    Marczak, L
    Mokdad, A. H
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Murray, C. J. L
    Health effects of overweight and obesity in 195 countries over 25 years2017In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 377, no 1, p. 13-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although the rising pandemic of obesity has received major attention in many countries, the effects of this attention on trends and the disease burden of obesity remain uncertain.

    METHODS: We analyzed data from 68.5 million persons to assess the trends in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children and adults between 1980 and 2015. Using the Global Burden of Disease study data and methods, we also quantified the burden of disease related to high body-mass index (BMI), according to age, sex, cause, and BMI in 195 countries between 1990 and 2015.

    RESULTS: In 2015, a total of 107.7 million children and 603.7 million adults were obese. Since 1980, the prevalence of obesity has doubled in more than 70 countries and has continuously increased in most other countries. Although the prevalence of obesity among children has been lower than that among adults, the rate of increase in childhood obesity in many countries has been greater than the rate of increase in adult obesity. High BMI accounted for 4.0 million deaths globally, nearly 40% of which occurred in persons who were not obese. More than two thirds of deaths related to high BMI were due to cardiovascular disease. The disease burden related to high BMI has increased since 1990; however, the rate of this increase has been attenuated owing to decreases in underlying rates of death from cardiovascular disease.

    CONCLUSIONS: The rapid increase in the prevalence and disease burden of elevated BMI highlights the need for continued focus on surveillance of BMI and identification, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based interventions to address this problem.

  • 2.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Skeletal muscle morphology and risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly men2015In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: While it is well known that physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, there is still a search for the mechanisms by which exercise exerts its positive effect. Skeletal muscle fibre type can be affected to some extent by exercise, and different fibre types possess different anti-inflammatory and glucometabolic properties that may influence cardiovascular disease risk.

    DESIGN: Population-based cohort study.

    METHODS: We investigated relations of skeletal muscle morphology to risk of cardiovascular events in a sample of 466 71-year-old men without cardiovascular disease, of which 295 were physically active (strenuous physical activity at least 3 h/week).

    RESULTS: During a median of 13.1 years of follow up, 173 major cardiovascular events occurred. Among physically active men, 10% higher proportion of type-I (slow-twitch oxidative) fibres was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.74-0.95) for cardiovascular events, and 10% higher proportion of type-IIx (fast-twitch glycolytic) fibres was associated with a HR of 1.24 (1.06-1.45), adjusting for age. Similar results were observed in several sets of multivariable-adjusted models. No association of muscle fibre type with risk of cardiovascular events was observed among physically inactive men.

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher skeletal muscle proportion of type-I fibres was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and a higher proportion of type-IIx fibres was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events. These relations were only observed in physically active men. Skeletal muscle fibre composition may be a mediator of the protective effects of exercise against cardiovascular disease.

  • 3. Arefalk, Gabriel
    et al.
    Hergens, Maria-Pia
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Lind, Lars
    Ye, Weimin
    Nyrén, Olof
    Lambe, Mats
    Sundström, Johan
    Smokeless tobacco (snus) and risk of heart failure: results from two Swedish cohorts2010In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 28, no suppl.A, p. E48-E49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Arefalk, Gabriel
    et al.
    Hergens, Maria-Pia
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Lind, Lars
    Ye, Weimin
    Nyrén, Olof
    Lambe, Mats
    Sundström, Johan
    Smokeless tobacco (snus) and risk of heart failure: results from two Swedish cohorts2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, ISSN 1741-8267, E-ISSN 1741-8275, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 1120-1127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oral moist snuff (snus) is discussed as a safer alternative to smoking, and its use is increasing. Based on its documented effect on blood pressure, we hypothesized that use of snus increases the risk of heart failure.

    Design: Two independent Swedish prospective cohorts; the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM), a community-based sample of 1076 elderly men, and the Construction Workers Cohort (CWC), a sample of 118,425 never-smoking male construction workers. Methods: Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate possible associations of snus use with risk of a first hospitalization for heart failure.

    Results: In ULSAM, 95 men were hospitalized for heart failure, during a median follow up of 8.9 years. In a model adjusted for established risk factors including past and present smoking exposure, current snus use was associated with a higher risk of heart failure [hazard ratio (HR) 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-4.22] relative to non-use. Snus use was particularly associated with risk of non-ischaemic heart failure (HR 2.55, 95% CI 1.12-5.82). In CWC, 545 men were hospitalized for heart failure, during a median follow up of 18 years. In multivariable-adjusted models, current snus use was moderately associated with a higher risk of heart failure (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.00-1.64) and non-ischaemic heart failure (HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.97-1.68) relative to never tobacco use.

    Conclusion: Data from two independent cohorts suggest that use of snus may be associated with a higher risk of heart failure.

  • 5. Arking, Dan E
    et al.
    Pulit, Sara L
    Crotti, Lia
    van der Harst, Pim
    Munroe, Patricia B
    Koopmann, Tamara T
    Sotoodehnia, Nona
    Rossin, Elizabeth J
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Newton-Cheh, Christopher
    Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization2014In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 826-836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals, we identified 35 common variant loci associated with QT interval that collectively explain similar to 8-10% of QT-interval variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 new QT interval-associated loci in 298 unrelated probands with LQTS identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies new candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS and SCD.

  • 6. Bandak, Ghassan
    et al.
    Sang, Yingying
    Gasparini, Alessandro
    Chang, Alex R
    Ballew, Shoshana H
    Evans, Marie
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Lund, Lars H
    Inker, Lesley A
    Grams, Morgan E
    Hyperkalemia after initiating renin-angiotensin system blockade: The Stockholm creatinine measurements (SCREAM) project2017In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 6, no 7, article id e005428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Concerns about hyperkalemia limit the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), but guidelines conflict regarding potassium-monitoring protocols. We quantified hyperkalemia monitoring and risks after ACE-I/ARB initiation and developed and validated a hyperkalemia susceptibility score.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We evaluated 69 426 new users of ACE-I/ARB therapy in the Stockholm Creatinine Measurements (SCREAM) project with medication initiation from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010, and follow-up for 1 year thereafter. Three fourths (76%) of SCREAM patients had potassium checked within the first year. Potassium >5 and >5.5 mmol/L occurred in 5.6% and 1.7%, respectively. As a comparison, we propensity-matched new ACE-I/ARB users to 20 186 new β-blocker users in SCREAM: 64% had potassium checked. The occurrence of elevated potassium levels was similar between new β-blocker and ACE-I/ARB users without kidney disease; only at estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) were risks higher among ACE-I/ARB users. We developed a hyperkalemia susceptibility score that incorporated estimated glomerular filtration rate, baseline potassium level, sex, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, and the concomitant use of potassium-sparing diuretics in new ACE-I/ARB users; this score accurately predicted 1-year hyperkalemia risk in the SCREAM cohort (area under the curve, 0.845, 95% CI: 0.840-0.869) and in a validation cohort from the US-based Geisinger Health System (N=19 524; area under the curve, 0.818, 95% CI: 0.794-0.841), with good calibration.

    CONCLUSIONS: Hyperkalemia within the first year of ACE-I/ARB therapy was relatively uncommon among people with estimated glomerular filtration rate >60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), but rates were much higher with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate. Use of the hyperkalemia susceptibility score may help guide laboratory monitoring and prescribing strategies.

  • 7. Barber, Ryan M
    et al.
    Fullman, Nancy
    Sorensen, Reed J
    Bollyky, Thomas
    McKee, Martin
    Nolte, Ellen
    Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu
    Abete, Kalkidan Hassen
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Karolinska institutet.
    Murray, Christopher J L
    Healthcare Access and Quality Index based on mortality from causes amenable to personal health care in 195 countries and territories, 1990–2015: a novel analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 20152017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 390, no 10091, p. 231-266Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Basu, S
    et al.
    Zethelius, B
    Helmersson, J
    Berne, C
    Larsson, A
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Cytokine-mediated inflammation is independently associated with insulin sensitivity measured by the euglycemic insulin clamp in a community-based cohort of elderly men2011In: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, ISSN 1940-5901, E-ISSN 1940-5901, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 164-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both clinical and experimental studies suggest a close relation between an inflammatory state and insulin resistance. We investigated the association between cytokine-mediated inflammation (high sensitivity C reactive protein [hsCRP] and interleukin [IL] 6) and insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated glucose disposal rate, assessed by the euglycemic insulin clamp) in a community-based cohort, with subgroup analyses of normal weight individuals without diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (NCEP). hsCRP and IL- 6 were inversely associated with insulin sensitivity (multivariable-adjusted regression coefficient for 1-SD increase of hsCRP -0.12 (-0.21-(-0.03), p=0.01) and of IL-6 - 0.11 (-0.21-(-0.02), p=0.01) in models adjusting for age and components of the metabolic syndrome (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, antihypertensive drugs, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting plasma glucose, waist circumference). The multivariable-adjusted association between hsCRP, IL-6 and insulin sensitivity were of a similar magnitude in normal weight individuals without diabetes and without the metabolic syndrome. Our data show that cytokine -mediated subclinical inflammation is independently associated with decreased insulin sensitivity also in apparently metabolically healthy normal weight individuals, indicating that the interplay between inflammatory processes and insulin resistance is present already in the early stages of the development of glucometabolic disease. (IJCEM1012002).

  • 9. Beijer, K.
    et al.
    Nowak, C.
    Sundström, J.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Karolinska Institutet.
    Fall, T.
    Lind, L.
    In search of causal pathways in diabetes: a study using proteomics and genotyping data from a cross-sectional study2019In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 62, no 11, p. 1998-2006Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Brück, Katharina
    et al.
    Jager, Kitty J
    Dounousi, Evangelia
    Kainz, Alexander
    Nitsch, Dorothea
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala university.
    Rothenbacher, Dietrich
    Browne, Gemma
    Capuano, Vincenzo
    Ferraro, Pietro Manuel
    Methodology used in studies reporting chronic kidney disease prevalence: a systematic literature review2015In: Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, ISSN 0931-0509, E-ISSN 1460-2385, Vol. 30, no Supp. 4, p. iv6-iv16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Many publications report the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the general population. Comparisons across studies are hampered as CKD prevalence estimations are influenced by study population characteristics and laboratory methods.

    METHODS: For this systematic review, two researchers independently searched PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify all original research articles that were published between 1 January 2003 and 1 November 2014 reporting the prevalence of CKD in the European adult general population. Data on study methodology and reporting of CKD prevalence results were independently extracted by two researchers.

    RESULTS: We identified 82 eligible publications and included 48 publications of individual studies for the data extraction. There was considerable variation in population sample selection. The majority of studies did not report the sampling frame used, and the response ranged from 10 to 87%. With regard to the assessment of kidney function, 67% used a Jaffe assay, whereas 13% used the enzymatic assay for creatinine determination. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry calibration was used in 29%. The CKD-EPI (52%) and MDRD (75%) equations were most often used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). CKD was defined as estimated GFR (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in 92% of studies. Urinary markers of CKD were assessed in 60% of the studies. CKD prevalence was reported by sex and age strata in 54 and 50% of the studies, respectively. In publications with a primary objective of reporting CKD prevalence, 39% reported a 95% confidence interval.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings from this systematic review showed considerable variation in methods for sampling the general population and assessment of kidney function across studies reporting CKD prevalence. These results are utilized to provide recommendations to help optimize both the design and the reporting of future CKD prevalence studies, which will enhance comparability of study results.

  • 11. Brück, Katharina
    et al.
    Stel, Vianda S
    Gambaro, Giovanni
    Hallan, Stein
    Völzke, Henry
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Kastarinen, Mika
    Guessous, Idris
    Vinhas, José
    Stengel, Bénédicte
    CKD prevalence varies across the European general population2016In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, ISSN 1046-6673, E-ISSN 1533-3450, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 2135-2147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CKD prevalence estimation is central to CKD management and prevention planning at the population level. This study estimated CKD prevalence in the European adult general population and investigated international variation in CKD prevalence by age, sex, and presence of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. We collected data from 19 general-population studies from 13 European countries. CKD stages 1-5 was defined as eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), as calculated by the CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration equation, or albuminuria >30 mg/g, and CKD stages 3-5 was defined as eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). CKD prevalence was age- and sex-standardized to the population of the 27 Member States of the European Union (EU27). We found considerable differences in both CKD stages 1-5 and CKD stages 3-5 prevalence across European study populations. The adjusted CKD stages 1-5 prevalence varied between 3.31% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.30% to 3.33%) in Norway and 17.3% (95% CI, 16.5% to 18.1%) in northeast Germany. The adjusted CKD stages 3-5 prevalence varied between 1.0% (95% CI, 0.7% to 1.3%) in central Italy and 5.9% (95% CI, 5.2% to 6.6%) in northeast Germany. The variation in CKD prevalence stratified by diabetes, hypertension, and obesity status followed the same pattern as the overall prevalence. In conclusion, this large-scale attempt to carefully characterize CKD prevalence in Europe identified substantial variation in CKD prevalence that appears to be due to factors other than the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.

  • 12. Burgaz, A.
    et al.
    Byberg, L.
    Rautiainen, S.
    Orsini, N.
    Hakansson, N.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Sundstrom, J.
    Lind, L.
    Melhus, H.
    Michaelsson, K.
    Wolk, A.
    Confirmed hypertension and plasma 25(OH)D concentrations amongst elderly men2011In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 269, no 2, p. 211-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The results of experimental studies suggest that vitamin D deficiency activates the renin-angiotensin system and predisposes to hypertension. Results of previous epidemiological studies investigating the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status and hypertension have not been consistent, perhaps because of their sole reliance on office blood pressure (BP) measurements leading to some misclassification of hypertension status. No previous studies have examined the association between 25(OH)D status and confirmed hypertension assessed with both office and 24-h BP measurements.

    Design. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated 833 Caucasian men, aged 71 +/- 0.6 years, to determine the association between plasma 25(OH)D concentrations, measured with high-pressure liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and the prevalence of hypertension. We used both supine office and 24-h BP measurements for classifying participants as normotensive or confirmed hypertensive; participants with inconsistent classifications were excluded.

    Results. In a multivariable adjusted logistic regression model, men with 25(OH)D concentrations < 37.5 nmol L-1 had a 3-fold higher prevalence of confirmed hypertension compared to those with >= 37.5 nmol L-1 25(OH)D (odds ratio = 3.3, 95% CI: 1.0-11.0).

    Conclusions. Our results show that low plasma 25(OH)D concentration is associated with a higher prevalence of confirmed hypertension.

  • 13. Böger, Carsten A
    et al.
    Chen, Ming-Huei
    Tin, Adrienne
    Olden, Matthias
    Köttgen, Anna
    de Boer, Ian H
    Fuchsberger, Christian
    O'Seaghdha, Conall M
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Kao, W. H. L
    CUBN is a gene locus for albuminuria2011In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, ISSN 1046-6673, E-ISSN 1533-3450, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 555-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of genetic risk factors for albuminuria may alter strategies for early prevention of CKD progression, particularly among patients with diabetes. Little is known about the influence of common genetic variants on albuminuria in both general and diabetic populations. We performed a meta-analysis of data from 63,153 individuals of European ancestry with genotype information from genome-wide association studies (CKDGen Consortium) and from a large candidate gene study (CARe Consortium) to identify susceptibility loci for the quantitative trait urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) and the clinical diagnosis microalbuminuria. We identified an association between a missense variant (I2984V) in the CUBN gene, which encodes cubilin, and both UACR (P = 1.1 × 10−11) and microalbuminuria (P = 0.001). We observed similar associations among 6981 African Americans in the CARe Consortium. The associations between this variant and both UACR and microalbuminuria were significant in individuals of European ancestry regardless of diabetes status. Finally, this variant associated with a 41% increased risk for the development of persistent microalbuminuria during 20 years of follow-up among 1304 participants with type 1 diabetes in the prospective DCCT/EDIC Study. In summary, we identified a missense CUBN variant that associates with levels of albuminuria in both the general population and in individuals with diabetes

  • 14. Carlsson, A. C.
    et al.
    Riserus, U.
    Engstrom, G.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Melander, O.
    Leander, K.
    Gigante, B.
    Hellenius, M-L
    de Faire, U.
    Novel and established anthropometric measures and the prediction of incident cardiovascular disease: a cohort study2013In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 1579-1585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare novel and established anthropometrical measures in their ability to predict cardiovascular disease (CVD), and to determine whether they improve risk prediction beyond classical risk factors in a cohort study of 60-year-old men and women. We also stratified the results according to gender to identify possible differences between men and women. Furthermore, we aimed to replicate our findings in a large independent cohort (The Malmo Diet and Cancer study-cardiovascular cohort).

    METHODS: This was a population-based study of 1751 men and 1990 women, aged 60 years and without CVD at baseline, with 375 incident cases of CVD during 11 years of follow-up. Weight, height, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) were measured at baseline. Body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), waist-hip-height ratio (WHHR), WC-to-height ratio (WCHR) and SAD-to-height ratio (SADHR) were calculated.

    RESULTS: All anthropometric measures predicted CVD in unadjusted Cox regression models per s.d. increment (hazard ratios, 95% confidence interval), while significant associations after adjustments for established risk CVD factors were noted for WHHR 1.20 (1.08-1.33), WHR 1.14 (1.02-1.28), SAD 1.13 (1.02-1.25) and SADHR 1.17 (1.06-1.28). WHHR had higher increases in C-statistics, and model improvements (likelihood ratio tests (P<0.001)). In the replication study (MDC-CC, n = 5180), WHHR was the only measure that improved Cox regression models in men (P = 0.01).

    CONCLUSION: WHHR, a new measure reflecting body fat distribution, showed the highest risk estimates after adjustments for established CVD risk factors. These findings were verified in men but not women in an independent cohort.

  • 15.
    Carlsson, A C
    et al.
    Division of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ; Centre for Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Riserus, Ulf
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Section of Geriatrics Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Borné, Y
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Leander, K
    Division of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gigante, B
    Division of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ; Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hellénius, M-L
    Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bottai, M
    Division of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    de Faire, U
    Division of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ; Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Prediction of cardiovascular disease by abdominal obesity measures is dependent on body weight and sex: results from two community based cohort studies2014In: NMCD. Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, ISSN 0939-4753, E-ISSN 1590-3729, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 891-899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To study waist-hip ratio (WHR), waist circumference (WC), sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD), and waist-hip-height ratio (WHHR) as predictors of CVD, in men and women stratified by BMI (cut-off ≥25).

    METHODS AND RESULTS: A cohort of n = 3741 (53% women) 60-year old individuals without CVD was followed for 11-years (375 CVD cases). To replicate the results, we also assessed another large independent cohort; The Malmö Diet and Cancer study - cardiovascular cohort (MDCC, (n = 5180, 60% women, 602 CVD cases during 16-years). After adjustment for established risk factors in normal-weight women, the hazard ratio (HR) per one standard deviation (SD) were; WHR; 1.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-2.70), WC; 1.81 (95% CI 1.02-3.20), SAD; 1.25 (95% CI 0.74-2.11), and WHHR; 1.97 (95% CI 1.40-2.78). In men the association with WHR, WHHR and WC were not significant, whereas SAD was the only measure that significantly predicted CVD in men (HR 1.19 (95% CI 1.04-1.35). After adjustments for established risk factors in overweight/obese women, none of the measures were significantly associated with CVD risk. In men, however, all measures were significant predictors; WHR; 1.24 (955 CI 1.04-1.47), WC 1.19 (95% CI 1.00-1.42), SAD 1.21 (95% CI 1.00-1.46), and WHHR; 1.23 (95% CI 1.05-1.44). Only the findings in men with BMI ≥ 25 were verified in MDCC.

    CONCLUSION: In normal weight individuals, WHHR and WHR were the best predictors in women, whereas SAD was the only independent predictor in men. Among overweight/obese individuals all measures failed to predict CVD in women, whereas WHHR was the strongest predictor after adjustments for CVD risk factors in men.

  • 16. Carlsson, A. C.
    et al.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Sundström, J.
    Michaëlsson, K.
    Byberg, L.
    Lind, L.
    Physical activity, obesity and risk of cardiovascular disease in middle-aged men during a median of 30 years of follow-up2016In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 359-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We aimed to investigate associations between combinations of body mass index (BMI)-categories, levels of physical activity and long-term risk of cardiovascular disease.

    Method and results: At age 50 years, cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in 2196 participating men of the ULSAM-study. This investigation was repeated at age 60, 70, 77 and 82 years. Being physically active (PA) was defined as three hours of recreational or hard physical training per week. The men were categorized according to BMI/PA-status, as PA/normal weight (n = 593 at baseline), non-PA/normal weight (BMI &lt; 25 kg/m2, n = 580), PA/overweight (n = 418), non-PA/overweight (BMI 25-30 kg/m2, n = 462), PA/obese (n = 62), non-PA/obese (BMI &gt;30 kg/m2, n = 81). We used updated data on BMI and physical activity obtained at all examinations. During follow-up (median 30 years) 850 individuals suffered a cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, stroke or heart failure). Using updated data on BMI/PA categories, an increased risk for cardiovascular disease was seen with increasing BMI, but a high physical activity was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease within each BMI category: non-PA/normal weight (hazard ratio (HR) 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.66), PA/overweight (HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.20-1.94), non-PA/overweight (HR 1.65, 95% CI 1.31-2.07) PA/obese (HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.44-2.92) and non-PA/obese (HR 2.39, 95% CI 1.74-3.29), using PA/normal weight men as referent.

    Conclusions: Although physical activity was beneficial at all levels of BMI regarding the risk of future cardiovascular disease, there was still a substantial increased risk associated with being overweight or obese during 30 years of follow-up. 

  • 17. Carlsson, A C
    et al.
    Östgren, C J
    Länne, T
    Larsson, A
    Nystrom, F H
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    The association between endostatin and kidney disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes2016In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Circulating endostatin, a biologically active derivate of collagen XVIII, is considered to be a marker of kidney disease and a risk factor for its related mortality. However, less is known of the role of endostatin in diabetes and the development of diabetic nephropathy. For this reason, our study investigated the associations between circulating endostatin and the prevalence and progression of kidney disease, and its mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

    METHODS: This was a cohort study of 607 patients with T2D (mean age: 61 years, 44% women). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) creatinine equation, was used to assess the patients' kidney function decline and mortality.

    RESULTS: Of the total study cohort, 20 patients declined by ≥20% in eGFR over 4 years, and 44 died during the follow-up (mean duration: 6.7 years). At baseline, participants with diabetic nephropathy (defined as eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2)) and/or microalbuminuria [defined as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR)>3g/mol] had higher median levels of endostatin than those without nephropathy (62.7μg/L vs 57.4μg/L, respectively; P=0.031). In longitudinal analyses adjusted for age, gender, baseline eGFR and ACR, higher endostatin levels were associated with a higher risk of decline (≥20% in eGFR, OR per 1 SD increase: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.13-2.65) and a higher risk of mortality (HR per 1 SD increase: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.19-2.07).

    CONCLUSION: In patients with T2D, circulating endostatin levels can predict the progression of kidney disease and mortality independently of established kidney disease markers. The clinical usefulness of endostatin as a risk marker in such patients merits further studies.

  • 18.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Centre for Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden ; Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Calamia, Michael
    Landstinget Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Section of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1 is associated with insulin resistance: results from two community-based studies of elderly individuals2014In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 103, no 3, p. 516-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Insulin resistance has been shown to be closely associated with glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, even prior to the development of diabetes. Urinary kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1) is a novel, highly specific marker of kidney tubular damage. The role of insulin resistance in the development of kidney tubular damage is not previously reported. Thus, we aimed to investigate the associations between insulin sensitivity (assessed by HOMA) and urinary KIM-1.

    DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: Two community-based cohorts of elderly individuals were investigated: Prospective Investigation of the vasculature in Uppsala seniors (PIVUS, n=701; mean age 75 years, 52% women); and Uppsala Longitudinal Study of adult men (ULSAM, n=533; mean age 78 years).

    RESULTS: Lower insulin sensitivity was associated with higher urinary KIM-1 in both cohorts after adjustments for age, BMI, blood pressure, antihypertensive treatment, glomerular filtration rate, and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (PIVUS: regression coefficient for 1-SD higher HOMA-IR 0.11, 95% CI 0.03-0.20, p=0.009, and ULSAM: 0.13, 95% CI 0.04-0.22, p=0.007). Results were similar in individuals without diabetes, with normal kidney function and normo-albuminuria.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our findings in elderly individuals support the notion that the interplay between an impaired glucose metabolism and renal tubular damage is evident even prior to the development of diabetes and overt kidney disease.

  • 19. Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Carrero, Juan-Jesus
    Stenvinkel, Peter
    Bottai, Matteo
    Barany, Peter
    Larsson, Anders
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Endostatin, cathepsin S, and cathepsin L, and their association with inflammatory markers and mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis2015In: Blood Purification, ISSN 0253-5068, E-ISSN 1421-9735, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 259-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Although both endostatin and cathepsins S have been associated with higher mortality, data in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are scarce.

    Methods: A longitudinal cohort study of 207 prevalent patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Results: Cathepsins S and L were associated with soluble receptors for tumor necrosis factor (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2, rho between 0.28 and 0.43, p < 0.001 for all). Weaker or absent associations between endostatin, cathepsins S and L were seen with other inflammatory biomarkers, that is, CRP, interleukin 6, pentraxin 3, and TNF. In Cox and Laplace regression models adjusted for age, sex, dialysis vintage, and diabetes: standard deviation increments of endostatin was associated with a lower mortality (hazard ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57-0.98), and with 6.8 months longer median survival.

    Conclusions: The high levels of endostatin, cathepsins S and L, and their associations with sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 warrant further studies exploring mortality, and the angiogenic and inflammatory pathways in ESRD. (C) 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 20. Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Carrero, Juan-Jesus
    Stenvinkel, Peter
    Bottai, Matteo
    Barany, Peter
    Larsson, Anders
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    High levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 and their association with mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis2015In: CardioRenal Medicine, ISSN 1664-3828, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 89-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Circulating soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR1 and 5TNFR2) are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression in patients with CKD or diabetes, and with higher mortality. However, data in patients with end-stage renal disease are scarce. Therefore, we analyzed serum levels of sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 and investigated their association with inflammatory markers and mortality in dialysis patients. Research Design and Methods: This was a longitudinal cohort study of 207 prevalent patients (median age 66 years, 56% men) undergoing hemodialysis in Stockholm, Sweden. Demographics, clinical characteristics, including comorbidities and laboratory data, were obtained at baseline, together with prospective follow-up for mortality.

    Results: The median sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 levels were 17,680 ng/l [95% confidence interval (CI) 17,023-18,337] and 24,450 ng/l (95% CI 23,721-25,179), respectively. During a follow-up of 31 months (interquartile range, 21-38), 77 patients died. There was no association between the levels of sTNFRs and mortality in Cox regression models, and no consistent trend towards higher or lower mortality was seen in Laplace regression models. sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 levels were highly associated with other inflammatory markers including interleukin-6, pentraxin 3 and TNF-alpha. Conclusions:Prevalent hemodialysis patients have several-fold higher levels of sTNFRs compared to previous studies in CKD stage 4 patients. As no consistent association between TNFR and mortality was observed, clinical implications of measuring these receptors to predict outcome end-stage renal disease patients provide limited results.

  • 21. Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Sundström, Johan
    Carrero, Juan Jesus
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Feldreich, Tobias
    Stenemo, Markus
    Larsson, Anders
    Lind, Lars
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Use of proteomics to investigate kidney function decline over 5 years2017In: American Society of Nephrology. Clinical Journal, ISSN 1555-9041, E-ISSN 1555-905X, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 1226-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Using a discovery/replication approach, we investigated associations between a multiplex panel of 80 circulating proteins associated with cardiovascular pathology or inflammation, and eGFR decline per year and CKD incidence.

    DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: We used two cohorts, the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors Study (PIVUS; n=687, mean age of 70 years, 51% women) and the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM; n=360 men, mean age of 78 years), with 5-year follow-up data on eGFR. There were 231 and 206 incident cases of CKD during follow-up in the PIVUS and ULSAM studies, respectively. Proteomic profiling of 80 proteins was assessed by a multiplex assay (proximity extension assay). The assay uses two antibodies for each protein and a PCR step to achieve a high-specific binding and the possibility to measure multiple proteins in parallel, but gives no absolute concentrations.

    RESULTS: In the discovery cohort from the PIVUS Study, 28 plasma proteins were significantly associated with eGFR decline per year, taking into account the multiple testing. Twenty of these proteins were significantly associated with eGFR decline per year in the replication cohort from the ULSAM Study after adjustment for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, medications, and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (in order of significance: TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 2*, CD40L receptor, TNF receptor 1*, placenta growth factor*, thrombomodulin*, urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor*, growth/differentiation factor 15*, macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1, fatty acid-binding protein*, cathepsin D, resistin, kallikrein 11*, C-C motif chemokine 3, proteinase-activated receptor 1*, cathepsin L, chitinase 3-like protein 1, TNF receptor 2*, fibroblast growth factor 23*, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, and kallikrein 6). Moreover, 11 of the proteins predicted CKD incidence (marked with * above). No protein consistently predicted eGFR decline per year independently of baseline eGFR in both cohorts.

    CONCLUSIONS: Several circulating proteins involved in phosphate homeostasis, inflammation, apoptosis, extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, and endothelial dysfunction were associated with worsening kidney function. Multiplex proteomics appears to be a promising way of discovering novel aspects of kidney disease pathology.

  • 22. Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Ruge, Toralph
    Larsson, Anders
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2, gender, and risk of myocardial infarction in Northern Sweden2018In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 272, p. 41-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Soluble receptors for tumor necrosis factor alpha (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, and some evidence points towards a difference in associated risk between men and women. We aimed to study the association between sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 and incident myocardial infarctions (MI) and to explore the influence of established cardiovascular risk factors in men and women.

    METHODS: We conducted a nested case control study in three large Swedish cohorts, including 533 myocardial infarction cases, and 1003 age-, sex- and cohort-matched controls. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.

    RESULTS: An association between circulating sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 and an increased risk for MI was found when comparing cases and controls. The odds ratios were significant after adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors and C-reactive protein in women (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.08-1.93 for TNFR1, and 1.61, 95% CI 1.11-2.34 for TNFR2), but was abolished in men. Women with a combination of elevated CRP and values in the upper quartile of TNFR1 or TNFR2 had a 5-fold higher risk of myocardial infarction versus those with normal CRP and values in the lower three quartiles of TNFR1 or TNFR2.

    CONCLUSIONS: As the risk estimates for TNFR1 and TNFR2 were higher and remained significant after adjustments for established cardiovascular risk factors in women but not in men, a potential role for TNFR1 and TNFR2 in identifying women with a higher MI risk is possible. The future clinical role of TNFR1 and TNFR2 in combination with CRP to identify high risk patients for coronary heart disease has yet to be determined.

  • 23. Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Juhlin, C Christofer
    Larsson, Tobias E
    Larsson, Anders
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Sundström, Johan
    Lind, Lars
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1) is associated with increased total mortality due to cancer and cardiovascular causes: findings from two community based cohorts of elderly2014In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 237, no 1, p. 236-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Experimental evidence support soluble receptors for tumor necrosis factor alpha as important mediators of the underlying pathology leading to cardiovascular disease and cancer. However, prospective data concerning the relation between circulating soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (sTNFR1) and mortality in humans are lacking. We aimed to explore and validate the association between sTNFR1 and mortality, and to explore the influence of other established risk factors for mortality, including other inflammatory markers.

    METHODS: The association between serum sTNFR1and the risk for mortality was investigated in two community-based cohorts of elderly: the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS; women 50%, n = 1005, mean age 70 years, median follow-up 7.9 years) and the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM, n = 775, mean age 77 years, median follow-up 8.1 years).

    RESULTS: In total, 101 participants in PIVUS and 274 in ULSAM died during follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for inflammation, lifestyle and established cardiovascular risk factors, one standard deviation (SD) higher sTNFR1 was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) for mortality of 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-1.60, in PIVUS and HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.37 in ULSAM. Moreover, circulatingsTNFR1 was associated with cardiovascular mortality (HR per SD of sTNFR1, 1.24, 95% CI 1.07-1.44) and cancer mortality (HR per SD of sTNFR1, 1.32, 95% CI 1.11-1.57) in the ULSAM cohort. High levels of sTNFR1 identified individuals with increased risk of mortality among those with high as well as low levels of systemic inflammation.

    CONCLUSIONS: An association between circulating sTNFR1 and an increased risk for mortality was found and validated in two independent community-based cohorts. The future clinical role of sTNFR1 to identify high risk patients for adverse outcomes and mortality has yet to be determined.

  • 24.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Centre for Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory, U