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  • 1.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Bastu i vått och torrt2017Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 2.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Finland and Japan: A peek into shared histories through tango's migration, transformation, and assimilation2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 3.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Japanska.
    Migration, transformation, and the homecoming of a culture: Tango in Finland and Japan as an example2016Ingår i: Migration, transformation, and the homecoming of a culture: Tango in Finland and Japan as an example, 2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In Finland, a great distance away from Buenos Aires, people crowd dance floors nightly to dance to tango music, while the tango has also captured the hearts of the people on the other side of the world in Japan. The popularity of the tango in both Finland and Japan, however, is not so familiar to the outside world.

     

    In this paper, I will discuss the motives and the paths by which a culture travels, settles and shapes itself into a new form, using the tango as an example. First, the tango’s relationship to society and history in each of these countries are explored using archives and literature. Then such aspects as inner emotion, solitude, illusion, and liminality are analyzed through data collected from surveys, interviews, and forum discussions in the SNS.

     

    Some scholars suggest that the tango reflects the personality, mentality, and identity of the Finnish and Japanese peoples. Though this may be partially true, it is difficult to generalize about the Finnish or Japanese personality. It is argued, rather, that the tango's prosperity in these two countries has significant connections to some shared historical and social factors. I also propose that the 'liminality' of tango dancing plays an important role in both nations that went through difficult struggles to recover from the damage caused by war. “The liminal phase is considered sacred, anomalous, abnormal and dangerous, while the pre- and post-liminal phases are normal and a profane state of being” (Selänniemi 1996). Tango dancing can be considered an escape or a vacation from the hardship of everyday life as well as a fuel which enables the people to keep moving forward.

    The tango’s transformation in Finland and Japan, and its homecoming back to Argentina are also examined. The results reveal some of the unusual paths a culture can travel.

  • 4.
    Bartholdsson, Åsa
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Socialantropologi.
    Narrating anger: Conceptualisations and representations of children’s anger in programmes for social and emotional learning2014Ingår i: Power and Education, ISSN 1757-7438, E-ISSN 1757-7438, Vol. 6, nr 3, s. 295-306Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 5.
    Bartholdsson, Åsa
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning och humaniora, Socialantropologi.
    Shaping the Pupil: Normalization and Benevolent Governing in Two Swedish Schools2012Ingår i: International Journal for Cross-Disciplinary Subjects in Education (IJCDSE), Special Issue, ISSN 2042-6364, Vol. 2, nr 2Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 6.
    Bastholm, Caroline
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Industri och samhälle, Energi och miljöteknik.
    Using locally available components and local knowledge to build sustainable stand-alone power systems2013Ingår i: Symposium Small PV-Applications : rural electrification and commercial use ; Ulm, Germany, June 17th/18th, 2013, Regensburg: Ostbayerisches Technologie-Transfer-Institut eV (OTTI) , 2013Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to point out benefits as well as disadvantages associated with the use of locally available, not necessarily standardized, components in stand-alone electrical power systems at rural locations. Advantages and challenges arising when the direct involvement in design, construction and maintenance of the power system is reserved to people based in the area of implementation are discussed. The presented research is centered around one particular PV-diesel hybrid system in Tanzania; a case study in which technical and social aspects related to the particular power system are studied.

  • 7.
    Hanefors, Monica
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning och humaniora, Socialantropologi.
    Book review: Gender, Tourism, Fun (?)2003Ingår i: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603, Vol. 6, nr 2, s. 185-188Artikel, recension (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 8.
    Hanefors, Monica
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning och humaniora, Socialantropologi.
    Book review: The Tourist Experience2003Ingår i: Tourism, Culture & Communication, ISSN 1098-304X, E-ISSN 1943-4146, Vol. 4, nr 3, s. 177-178Artikel, recension (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 9.
    Hedberg, Anna Sofia
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning och humaniora, Socialantropologi.
    Book Review: Carel Roessingh and Tanja Plasil. Between Horse & Buggy and Four-wheel Drive – Change and Diversity among Mennonite Settlements in Belize, Central America (2009) Amsterdam, VU University Press2012Ingår i: Revista Europea de Estudios Latinoamericanos y del Caribe / European Review of Latin American and Caribbean Studies, ISSN 0924-0608, E-ISSN 1879-4750, nr 92Artikel, recension (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 10.
    Hedberg, Anna Sofia
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Socialantropologi.
    The dynamics of boundaries: obedience and transgression among Old Colony Mennonites in Bolivia2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 11.
    Laine, Anna
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning och humaniora, Socialantropologi.
    Intervention or inspiration?: Kolam and fieldwork ethics in the Tamil diaspora2012Ingår i: Anthropology Today, ISSN 0268-540X, E-ISSN 1467-8322, Vol. 28, nr 6, s. 3-6Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores a classic dilemma concerning the extent to which anthropologist fieldworkers may influence their fieldwork hosts. This dilemma arose in the course of the author’s research on kolam drawing practices among diaspora Tamils in the UK. Kolam constitute a popular visual practice among Tamils in India and Sri Lanka, but less so in the diaspora. However, the researcher’s interest in kolam practice began to awaken an interest on the part of diaspora Tamils in the UK and affect the very practices researched. Does this constitute an intervention or might it be considered an appropriate form of inspiration? The article makes a contribution to the literature on ethics and on diasporic communities, whose members, although reticent to perpetuate practices that might upset their host society, may nevertheless defer to researchers with specialist knowledge of their homeland. © RAI 2012.

  • 12.
    Purcell Sjölund, Anita
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Humaniora och medier, Engelska. University of Otago .
    An analysis of Samoan reaction to The Orator (O Le Tulafale)’s Fāgogo defining Samoan identity2013Studentarbete övrigtStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    The Orator (O Le Tulafale) was promoted as the first Samoan language film shot in Samoa with a Samoan cast and crew. Written and directed by Samoan filmmaker Tusi Tamasese, the film succeeded at several of the movie industry’s prestigious festivals. The Orator (O Le Tulafale) is about an outcast family of a dwarf (Saili), his wife and her teenage daughter. As the main protagonist, Saili battles to overcome his fears to become a chief to save his family and land. The film’s themes are courage, love, honour , as well as hypocrisy, violence, and discrimination. A backlash by Samoans was predicted ; however, the opposite occurred. This raised the following questions: first, what is it about the film causing this reaction? It is a 106 -minute film shot in Samoa about Samoans and the Samoan culture . D espite promotional claims about the film , there have been Samoan -produced films in Samoa . Secondly, to what are Samoans really responding? Is it 1) just to the film because it is about Samoa, or 2) are they responding to themselves , and how they reacted during the act of watching the film? This implies levels of reactions in the act of watching, and examining the dominant level of response is important. To explore this, t he Samoan story telling technique of Fāgogo was used to analyse the film’s narration and narrative techniques. R. Allen’s (1993, 1997) concept of projected illusion was employed to discuss the relationship between Samoans and the film developed during the act of watching. An examination of the term Samoan and a description of the framework of Fa’a Samoa (Samoan culture) were provided. Also included were discussions of memory and its impact on Samoan cultural identity. The analysis indicated that The Orator (O Le Tulafale) acted as a memory prompt through which Samoans recalled memories confirming and defining cultural bonds. These memories constituted the essence of being Samoan. These memories were awakened, and shared as oral histories as fāgogo. The receivers appeared to interpret the shared memories to create their own memories and stories to suit their contexts, according to Facebook postings. An interpretation is that the organic sharing of memories as fā gogo created a global definition of Samoan that Samoans internationally claimed.

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