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Swenberg, ThorbjörnORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2006-4522
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Swenberg, T., Kostela, J. & Saveljeff, S. (2023). Expectations on the University – the Design of its Role in a RIS. In: Proceedings: . Paper presented at 24th CINet Conference: Taking care of our future, foresight and innovation for a sustainable world, Linz, Austria, 17-19 September, 2023 (pp. 460-472). CINet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expectations on the University – the Design of its Role in a RIS
2023 (English)In: Proceedings, CINet , 2023, p. 460-472Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There are many expectations on Higher Education Institutions (HEI:s) from a range of other actors and organizations to involve and engage in systematic regional innovation and development. Likewise, attempts to achieve such involvement and engagement are many, but success is varied. This paper analyzes the consequences of multifaceted expectations on HEI:s from regional actors, for the involvement and engagement of academics in systematic innovation. Issues of conflict are discovered that constitute obstacles for collaboration. The aim of this study is to highlight disagreements regarding the university’s role in (regional) innovation systems in order to help solve such issues. Theoretically, we approach innovation systems as social systems, and consider systems as subjects of design. Empirically, we have collected policy documents (including figures), interviews, and workshop discussions between representatives for local and regional public administration, intermediary organizations, the university, as well as others, from four Swedish regions. We conclude by providing a set of considerations possible for use when designing the role of the university in an innovation system, thus facilitating a broader and deeper involvement and engagement of academics in innovation processes, or the support of such processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CINet, 2023
Keywords
innovation involvement, innovation engagement, innovation system functions, innovation agency
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Forskargrupp/Seminariegrupp, Audiovisuella seminariet
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-47011 (URN)978-90-77360-26-2 (ISBN)
Conference
24th CINet Conference: Taking care of our future, foresight and innovation for a sustainable world, Linz, Austria, 17-19 September, 2023
Funder
Dalarna University
Available from: 2023-09-22 Created: 2023-09-22 Last updated: 2023-09-25Bibliographically approved
Swenberg, T., Thedeby, M., Berg, L. & Jonsson, H. (2022). Eyelight enhances perceived emotional responses in cinema. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 16(3), 389-399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eyelight enhances perceived emotional responses in cinema
2022 (English)In: Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, ISSN 1931-3896, E-ISSN 1931-390X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 389-399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Eyelight, in the eyes of a human portrayed on film, is a cinematographic means to augment the vividness of expressed emotions. This is used by both cinematographers and stills photographers, and it is also expressed in Anglo-Saxon, Arabic, and Japanese literatures. Here, the effect of using eyelight in the cornea of the human eye on film is examined by eye-tracking individuals on a Swedish university campus, in order to study their perceptual responses to film characters, with, or without, a glimpse of light in their eyes. The participants’ perceived capacity to discern the emotional states of the film characters was also tested. Eye-tracking data were analysed for entry time, fixation time, dwell time, hit ratio and revisitors, while emotional decoding was captured through a self-report survey, and by open questions. Our results demonstrated that film viewers’ attention is captured 49% faster, and 11% less time is used per fixation to film characters’ eyes, when eyelight is used. In addition, 58% of our participants claimed that emotions were easy to discern from eyes in the eyelight condition, whereas only 36% claimed that emotions were easy to discern under the no-eyelight condition. Although our results concern the subjective impression of one’s ability to discern the emotions of each film character, they offer preliminary support for the idea of using eyelight to enhance emotional communication in film and stills photography.

Keywords
eyelight, catchlight, film characters, eye-tracking, emotion
National Category
Studies on Film Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-35762 (URN)10.1037/aca0000383 (DOI)000733027600001 ()
Available from: 2020-12-30 Created: 2020-12-30 Last updated: 2023-03-17Bibliographically approved
Swenberg, T. & Sverrisson, Á. (2021). Agents, Design and Creativity in Moving Image Postproduction: Conditions for Collaborative Creativity in Digital Media. Journal of Integrated Design & Process Science, 23(4), 29-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agents, Design and Creativity in Moving Image Postproduction: Conditions for Collaborative Creativity in Digital Media
2021 (English)In: Journal of Integrated Design & Process Science, ISSN 1092-0617, E-ISSN 1875-8959, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 29-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyses how creativity in the making of films and TV is constrained as a consequence of the shift to digital production technology, and the resulting change in work activities for different crafts involved in the postproduction process. We adapt the concept of creative spaces in order to describe these constraints, and we introduce the term audiovisual assemblies to facilitate an analysis of collaboration. We argue that this study is well-accomplished by analyzing collections of existing media productions. We identify two contradicting practices: first, the development of new conventions which reallocate roles and resources in the making of audiovisual assemblies, and second, the high rate and broad range of incremental technological change which demand unconventional, but creative, problem-solving practices from everyone involved. Examples are provided from an innovative Swedish TV-production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2021
Keywords
media production, creativity, collaboration, workflow, file formats
National Category
Design Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Intercultural Studies, Kreativa beslut i produktionssituation inom filmproduktion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-10839 (URN)10.3233/JID200003 (DOI)000621424800003 ()
Funder
EU, European Research Council
Available from: 2012-09-28 Created: 2012-09-28 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Swenberg, T. & Ekwall, P. E. (2021). Mediegestaltningens syfte (1:1ed.). In: Pernilla Falkenberg Josefsson och Mikael Wiberg (Ed.), Introduktion till medieteknik: (pp. 79-95). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediegestaltningens syfte
2021 (Swedish)In: Introduktion till medieteknik / [ed] Pernilla Falkenberg Josefsson och Mikael Wiberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, 1:1, p. 79-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Allt som skapas som en färdig produkt eller tjänst inom medieproduktion eller medieteknik har en yttre formgivning som står i relation till dess funktion. Gestaltningen måste samspela med funktionen för att produkten eller tjänsten ska bli begriplig och funktionell för användaren eller publiken. Därför måste man förstå syftet med själva gestaltningen och hur den relaterar till det övergripande syftet med produkten eller tjänsten.

Detta kapitel bearbetar dessa frågor och kommer med förslag på olika sätt att ta sig an gestaltningens utmaningar när man skapar olika typer av medieartefakter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021 Edition: 1:1
Keywords
medieproduktion, mediegestaltning, medialt objekt, mediala objekt, mediedesign, medieartefakt
National Category
Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-39080 (URN)978-91-44-14167-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-12-17 Created: 2021-12-17 Last updated: 2023-10-26Bibliographically approved
Swenberg, T. & Carlgren, S. (2021). On-Beat/Off-Beat: Visual Responses to Audio-Visual Asynchrony in Music Videos. Projections, 15(1), 28-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On-Beat/Off-Beat: Visual Responses to Audio-Visual Asynchrony in Music Videos
2021 (English)In: Projections, ISSN 1934-9688, E-ISSN 1934-9696, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 28-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Audio-visual rhythm can be achieved in a variety of ways, in film as well as in music videos. Here, we have studied human visual responses to video editing with regard to musical beats, in order to better understand the role of visual rhythm in an audio-visual fl ow. While some suggest that musicvideos should maintain synchrony in the audio-visual rhythm, and others claim that music videos should be rhythmically loose in their structure, there is a functional aspect of vision and hearing that reacts to the juxtaposition of audio and visual rhythms. We present empirical evidence of cognitive effects, as well as perceptual differences with attentional effects, for viewers watching music videos cut on-beat and off-beat.

Keywords
audio-visual asynchrony, audio-visual rhythm, audio-visual synchrony, cueing, eye-tracking, music video
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Intercultural Studies, Klipparens visuella intention och tittarens visuella perception
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-36758 (URN)10.3167/proj.2021.150103 (DOI)000646836600003 ()2-s2.0-85133444623 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-04 Created: 2021-05-04 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Swenberg, T., Kostela, J. & Saveljeff, S. (2020). Regional “Innovation Systems” vis-à-vis “Innovation Support Systems" – Is clarification needed?. Industry and Higher Education, 34(6), 371-376
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regional “Innovation Systems” vis-à-vis “Innovation Support Systems" – Is clarification needed?
2020 (English)In: Industry and Higher Education, ISSN 0950-4222, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 371-376Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How language is used has political implications as well as communicational consequences. Regional development, using means of systematic support for innovation, is a widespread phenomenon globally that also includes numerous political ambitions and implications. This article argues that ambiguities regarding the use of terms such as ‘innovation system’ and ‘innovation support system’ need to be clarified to improve communication in this field, as well as to reveal underlying political ideas on how systematic support for innovation should be carried out, by drawing on examples from studies of regional systems. Such ambiguities contribute significantly to the often-mentioned lack of involvement and engagement in regional development on the part of higher education institutions and academics. Examining key terms and concepts of this discourse, in the interests of promoting a common and stringent use of terminology, helps to illuminate whether the desired academic involvement in innovation processes relates to ideation, implementation and commercialization, or to support for processes through the contribution of knowledge and expertise.

Keywords
innovation process, innovation involvement, innovation engagement, innovation system functions, innovation agency, Higher Educational Institutions
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Economics and Business Economic Geography
Research subject
Research Profiles 2009-2020, Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-31441 (URN)10.1177/0950422220909301 (DOI)000523802500001 ()2-s2.0-85081603131 (Scopus ID)
Projects
RegIno
Available from: 2019-12-20 Created: 2019-12-20 Last updated: 2021-11-12Bibliographically approved
Swenberg, T., Kostela, J. & Saveljeff, S. (2019). Design Matters for the Role of the University in a Regional Innovation System. In: : . Paper presented at The University-Industry Engagement Conference, Sydney, Australia 11-13 February 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design Matters for the Role of the University in a Regional Innovation System
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The role of a university in an innovation system can take on various forms. The design of that role depends on how the university enters into collaboration with other parties in the innovation system, and how they all contribute to this design. Here, we apply a social system’s design perspective, and point out some key issues and aspects that should be considered if the role of universities is to be purposefully designed, rather than formed ad hoc.

The purpose of such a design would be to support a wide scope of mutual benefits for the university and its collaborators – a “maximum output” from the engagement. The aim here is to point out concrete matters for the system’s designer(s) to consider, in order to create a role for the university in the innovation system that embraces a range of the university’s assets and capacities. Therefore, we address a number of critical issues and aspects affecting the functioning of the university in regard to an associated regional innovation system. Why these factors are critical will also be discussed.

The paper stems from a pilot-project, where 16 semi-structured interviews from four (4) different Swedish regions were analysed, including regional innovation system executives, university innovation officers and leaders, as well as university research group leaders. We have analysed the reason why certain issues are critical for success when designing a university’s role in a regional innovation system:

First, a university's contribution to the support of an innovation system through expertise consultancy and resources require other factors than participation in the innovation process by knowledge involvement does. Second, within the university there is a tendency to make a distinction between the ideation part and the utilisation part of the innovation process: different units at the university tend to show more engagement in different aspects of the process. Third, research commission is at heart for both university researchers and external parties. Fourth, the university comprises multifaceted capacities and potentials to sustain core functions in the innovation processes: as a meeting place; as a strategic knowledge broker; or as a driving force. Fifth, a university’s various networks  is a resource that might be underestimated by external parties. Sixth, much of collaborative innovation is accomplished in smaller units within the university, far from centralised university administration. Centralisation supports the university’s relations to external parties, whereas de-centralised and independent involvement of university units supports direct and efficient collaboration.  

To maximise the output from the university’s engagement in the innovation system, the university’s role must be designed to distinguish between involvement in, or support of, innovation processes, between internal and external context requirements, and between what functions are suitable for innovation collaboration for different units of the university.

Keywords
University role, Design matters, Innovation engagement, Innovation system, Innovation support, Regional development
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Research Profiles 2009-2020, Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29576 (URN)
Conference
The University-Industry Engagement Conference, Sydney, Australia 11-13 February 2019
Projects
RegIno
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2021-11-12Bibliographically approved
Swenberg, T., Kostela, J. & Saveljeff, S. (2019). Disjunctive External and Internal Ideas on the University's Role in a Regional Innovation System. In: : . Paper presented at The University-Industry Engagement Conference, Sydney, Australia 11-13 February 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disjunctive External and Internal Ideas on the University's Role in a Regional Innovation System
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Regional innovation systems are recurrently presented by model figures. The purpose of such figures is to monitor certain ideas regarding each presented system. The topic of this paper is the role of the University represented through such model figures, and what ideas such figures are created to promote. In analysing the models, a visual communication perspective is paired with network notions.

The current objective is to discuss what politics can be found behind the idea promotion, when figures created within a university is compared to figures created outside of it. The aim is to clarify core differences between motives underlying the engagement of a university in its associated regional innovation system, by taking on the research question: How should we understand the disjunctions between model imagery on the University’s role in a regional innovation system used by people inside and outside of the University, respectively?

The research method used in this pilot-project, focusing on the Dalarna region of Sweden, is an analysis of policy documents in combination with interviews. The policy documents come from universities, as well as from other institutions engaged in regional innovation systems. Primarily the model figure of the regional innovation system presented by Region Dalarna (http://www.regiondalarna.se/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Mobilisera-for-tillvaxt-Innovationsarbete-och-smart-specialisering.pdf [p.18]) is compared to Dalarna University’s model figure of its regional collaboration self-understanding (https://www.du.se/sv/Samverkan/Lägesrapport och slutrapport – Förstudie Högskolan Dalarnas roll i det regionala innovationssystemet.pdf [p.11]), and analysed in regard to policy documents on the Dalarna innovation system. Semi-structured interviews are also made with regional innovation system executives, university innovation officers and leaders, as well as university research group leaders, 14 interviews in total, spread across four (4) different Swedish regions.

The results are several: there are commonalities in the understanding of the university’s role in the Dalarna innovation system, inside and outside of Dalarna University, but also several disjunctions:

(1)   It is a common understanding that there could be cooperation between the university and others based on research, and/or through education.

(2)   One disjunction regard whether the university should act as one centrally organized hub for such collaboration, or function through a more scattered and self-organized set of units, in accordance with specific knowledge areas, where collaboration takes place.

(3)   Another disjunction appears concerning the university’s role in regard to innovation, whether it should be expected to be involved in the very innovation processes, or be an external part in support of innovation by providing resources and expertise for those that innovate.

(4)   A third disjunction concerns the university’s regional engagement, whether its prime efforts should be focused inwards the region, or if it is more important to function as a network provider and facilitator towards other regions as well as globally.

(5)   The fourth encountered disjunction regards weather the university should take on the intermediating role as a (strategic) knowledge broker that connects and encourages parties to innovation collaboration, or, yet again, the active role as the (leading) driving force in collective innovation processes, covering entire strategic areas of intervention.

(6)   A more delicate disjunction, the fifth, is the different views on knowledge, where the external expectations on the university is to deliver configured pieces of knowledge, from research or education, ready to exploit into innovation and business, whereas the university’s internal understanding is that knowledge should be developed during the collaborative process, jointly with the external parties.

The implications of these results are that (1) the common attitude of the possibility for the university to be involved in the regional innovation system which constitutes the vital starting point for such involvement to be achieved in a systematic and meaningful way. The disjunctions are in that sense topics for negotiation: (2) how much the university should centralize its innovation system involvement must be balanced against the benefits of free and active collaboration with external parties on the level of units and individuals within the organization; (3) to what degree supportive functions for an innovation system should be expected from a university, or from others, and what actual innovation activities the university should be involved in, or not; (4) weather the university should have a more operative engagement within the region, or rather emphasize its capacity as a bridge towards other regions and countries through its networks; (5) in what regards it is useful that the university has a more strategic or leading role in terms of broking knowledge, or driving innovation processes; and (6) what are the goals and terms of collaboration – exploitation of existing knowledge or mutual development of new knowledge?

We see, as the main outcomes of this study, that the outset for a university to engage in the regional innovation system is affirmative, when involvement is recognized as possible in both research and education, from within as well as from outside the university. The existing disjunctions regarding a university’s role in the innovation system, though, present a challenge for negotiation, which, if not taken seriously, risks a collapse of collaborations and a failure of the involvement.

Keywords
terms of involvement, centralization, self-organisation, global networks, regional focus, meeting place, knowledge broker, driving force
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Research Profiles 2009-2020, Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-29580 (URN)
Conference
The University-Industry Engagement Conference, Sydney, Australia 11-13 February 2019
Projects
RegIno
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2021-11-12Bibliographically approved
Swenberg, T. (2018). Complex design data joined in audiovisual representation: Benefits and issues in analysis. In: PIN-C Conference Proceedings 2018: . Paper presented at Participatory Innovation Conference 2018, Eskilstuna, Sweden (pp. 319-323). Eskilstuna
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complex design data joined in audiovisual representation: Benefits and issues in analysis
2018 (English)In: PIN-C Conference Proceedings 2018, Eskilstuna, 2018, p. 319-323Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Participatory methods in design or innovationresearch can require several different kinds of datain order to cover the object or process of interest tothe study. This paper addresses the potential anddifficulties of joining and analyzing several datacategories into a unified observational video, whereall data is represented in either audio, visual oraudiovisual form. The core problem of such acomplex body of data is that the analysis requiresefficient tools and/or methods to match the datacomplexity. The current case regards a participatorystudy on film editing, its method and datacomplexity, and discusses analytical approaches.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Eskilstuna: , 2018
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Design
Research subject
Research Profiles 2009-2020, Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-28051 (URN)
Conference
Participatory Innovation Conference 2018, Eskilstuna, Sweden
Available from: 2018-06-29 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2021-11-12Bibliographically approved
Swenberg, T. & Eriksson, P. E. (2018). Effects of continuity or discontinuity in actual film editing. Empirical Studies of the Arts, 36(2), 222-246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of continuity or discontinuity in actual film editing
2018 (English)In: Empirical Studies of the Arts, ISSN 0276-2374, E-ISSN 1541-4493, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 222-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A film editor’s refining of film edits at a frame-by-frame matching is an effort of perceptual precision. This paper investigates whether a failure of a few frames would jeopardize the perceived continuity of the film. 33 Swedish students, 17 female, average age 26, were eye tracked while watching two versions of the same documentary film sequence, where one version was completed to satisfaction by a film editor, and the other version had its edits altered 4-6 frames against the film editor’s intentions.

The analysis scrutinized gaze hits in Areas-of-Interest (AoI:s) appointed by the film editor, as well as saccade frequency and pupil dilation after edit points. No significant difference was found for gaze hits in AoI:s, whereas saccade frequency increased 120-400 ms after edit points by  29.4%, and pupil sizes increased by 28% relative size, 200-500 ms after edits, both in the altered version of the film sequence.

These results indicates that the altered film sequence constrained viewers, with possible cognitive effects, which implies that the frame-by-frame matching of film edits achieved by film editors is crucial to film continuity.

Keywords
film editing, perceptual precision, film continuity, film viewing, eye tracking, edit points, frame matching
National Category
Design Studies on Film
Research subject
Research Profiles 2009-2020, Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:du-26443 (URN)10.1177/0276237417744590 (DOI)000433911400005 ()2-s2.0-85047930057 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-19 Created: 2017-10-19 Last updated: 2023-10-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2006-4522

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