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  • 1.
    Artzi-Medvedik, Rada
    et al.
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel; Maccabi Health Services, Southern District, Omer, Israel.
    Kob, Robert
    Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Nürnberg, Germany.
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    Italian National Research Center on Aging (IRCCS INRCA), Ancona, Italy.
    Lattanzio, Fabrizia
    Italian National Research Center on Aging (IRCCS INRCA), Ancona, Italy.
    Corsonello, Andrea
    Italian National Research Center on Aging (IRCCS INRCA), Ancona, Italy.
    Yehoshua, Ilan
    Maccabi Health Services, Southern District, Omer, Israel.
    Roller-Wirnsberger, Regina E
    Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Wirnsberger, Gerhard H
    Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S
    University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Tap, Lisanne
    University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Gil, Pedro G
    Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
    Formiga, Francesc
    Bellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELL-L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
    Moreno-González, Rafael
    Bellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELL-L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
    Kostka, Tomasz
    Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.
    Guligowska, Agnieszka
    Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge; Stockholm Region, Stockholm.
    Freiberger, Ellen
    Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Nürnberg, Germany.
    Melzer, Itshak
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.
    Quality of Life and Kidney Function in Older Adults: Prospective Data of the SCOPE Study2023In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 12, no 12, article id 3959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A longitudinal alteration in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) over a two-year period and its association with early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression was investigated among 1748 older adults (>75 years). HRQoL was measured by the Euro-Quality of Life Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) at baseline and at one and two years after recruitment. A full comprehensive geriatric assessment was performed, including sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). The association between EQ-VAS decline and covariates was investigated by multivariable analyses. A total of 41% of the participants showed EQ-VAS decline, and 16.3% showed kidney function decline over the two-year follow-up period. Participants with EQ-VAS decline showed an increase in GDS-SF scores and a greater decline in SPPB scores. The logistic regression analyses showed no contribution of a decrease in kidney function on EQ-VAS decline in the early stages of CKD. However, older adults with a greater GDS-SF score were more likely to present EQ-VAS decline over time, whereas an increase in the SPPB scores was associated with less EQ-VAS decline. This finding should be considered in clinical practice and when HRQoL is used to evaluate health interventions among older adults.

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  • 2. Blomberg, Oscar
    et al.
    Svedin, Frida
    Farrand, Paul
    Brantnell, Anders
    von Essen, Louise
    Karlsson, Johanna Patriksson
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Woodford, Joanne
    Adaptation of a guided low-intensity behavioral activation intervention for people with dementia in Sweden: a qualitative study exploring the needs and preferences of key stakeholders2024In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Despite depression being prevalent in people with dementia, contributing to negative health outcomes and placing increased burden on individuals and family members, access to psychological interventions is limited. A potential solution is guided low-intensity behavioral activation, supported by informal caregivers and guided by healthcare professionals. However, it is necessary to adapt interventions to meet the needs and preferences of key stakeholders to enhance acceptability and relevance. Study objectives were to: (1) explore needs and preferences concerning the content and delivery model of the guided low-intensity behavioral activation intervention; and (2) adapt the intervention to ensure cultural appropriateness, relevancy, and acceptability to people with dementia and their caregivers in Sweden. 

    Methods

    Semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with key stakeholders, including healthcare professionals (n = 18), community stakeholders (n = 7), people with dementia (n = 8), and informal caregivers (n = 19). A draft of the written low-intensity behavioral activation intervention and a description of the proposed intervention delivery model were provided to participants. Open-ended questions explored the perceived relevance of the intervention, alongside needs and preferences concerning content and delivery. A manifest content analysis approach was adopted. 

    Results

    Content analysis resulted in three categories: Content, Delivery procedures, and Illness trajectory. Results highlighted a need to consider the intervention Content via increased cultural adaptation to the Swedish context, and increasing the inclusiveness of intervention content. Delivery procedures were identified as needing to be flexible given the unpredictable nature of caring for people with dementia, with the provision of additional guidance to informal caregivers supporting the intervention. Illness trajectory was viewed as essential to consider, with the intervention regarded as suitable for those early in the dementia trajectory, alongside a need to reduce workbook text to minimize burden given dementia symptomology. 

    Conclusions

    The intervention and proposed delivery model were generally well received by all stakeholders. We were able to identify key adaptations to enhance cultural appropriateness, relevancy, and acceptability for a currently neglected population. Results will inform a feasibility study to explore the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and study procedures to inform the design of a future superiority randomized controlled trial.

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  • 3. Carlsson, Eva
    et al.
    Stålnacke, Katri
    Persenius, Mona
    Olai, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Hägg, Mary
    Aspects of eating and quality of care among elderly in short-term accommodations - before and after an intervention.2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Cederbom, Sara
    et al.
    OsloMet, Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Arkkukangas, Marina
    Uppsala universitet.
    Impact of the fall prevention Otago Exercise Programme on pain among community-dwelling older adults: a short- and long-term follow-up study2019In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 14, p. 721-726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pain is a major public health issue among community-dwelling older adults, with a prevalence of 45-80%. In addition to being strongly associated with reduced physical function, loss of independence, psychological distress, lower quality of life, and risk of earlier death. Recent research has also found that pain in older adults is associated with a higher risk of falls, which itself is another major health concern. Long-term and high-intensity pain are predictors of chronic pain and pain-related disability. Therefore, establishing an evidence-based intervention that can reduce both pain and falls in older adults is of high importance.

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate whether a home-based fall-preventive exercise-program can reduce pain in the target population over both the short and long term.

    Patients and methods: This was a quasi-experimental study with a 1-group pretest-posttest design. We included 119 participants who had participated in a recent 2-year fall prevention intervention in a randomized controlled trial. The intervention included exercises based on the Otago Exercise Programme (OEP), an individually tailored and prescribed program that involves home-based exercises supervised by a physiotherapist. Pain was measured using an item from the EuroQol-5D questionnaire.

    Results: Pain was significantly reduced from baseline (n=119) at 3 (n=105, p=0.003), 12 (n=96, p=0.041), and 24 (n=80, p=0.028) months following the commencement of OEP-based exercises.

    Conclusions: These results indicate that the OEP could be a suitable evidence-based program for both pain management and fall prevention among community-dwelling older people who live with pain and are at a higher risk of falling. Our study highlights an effective technique for better pain management and fall prevention in older adults.

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  • 5.
    Corsonello, Andrea
    et al.
    Italian National Research Center on Aging (IRCCS INRCA), Ancona, Fermo and Cosenza, Italy.
    Soraci, Luca
    Italian National Research Center on Aging (IRCCS INRCA), Ancona, Fermo and Cosenza, Italy.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Academic Primary Health Care Centre, Stockholm Region, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roller-Wirnsberger, Regina
    Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Wirnsberger, Gerhard
    Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Mattace-Raso, Francesco
    Section of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Tap, Lisanne
    Section of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Rudholm Feldreich, Tobias
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science.
    Lattanzio, Fabrizia
    Italian National Research Center on Aging (IRCCS INRCA), Ancona, Fermo and Cosenza, Italy.
    The relevance of geriatric assessments on the association between chronic kidney disease stages and mortality among older people: A secondary analysis of a multicentre cohort study2022In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 51, no 7, article id afac168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: age-adapted definition of chronic kidney disease (CKD) does not take individual risk factors into account. We aimed at investigating whether functional impairments influence CKD stage at which mortality increases among older people. Methods: our series consisted of 2,372 outpatients aged 75 years or more enrolled in a multicentre international prospective cohort study. The study outcome was 24-month mortality. Kidney function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). Geriatric assessments included handgrip strength, short physical performance battery (SPPB), cognitive impairment, dependency in basic activities of daily living (BADL) and risk of malnutrition. Analysis was carried out by Cox regression, before and after stratification by individual functional impairments. Survival trees including kidney function and functional impairments were also investigated, and their predictivity assessed by C-index. Results: overall, mortality was found to increase starting from eGFR = 30-44.9 ml/min/1.73 m2 (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.81-5.95) to ACR = 30-300 mg/g (HR = 1.96, 95%CI = 1.23-3.10). However, in survival trees, an increased risk of mortality was observed among patients with impaired handgrip and eGFR = 45-59.9 ml/min/1.73 m2, as well as patients with ACR < 30 mg/g and impaired handgrip and SPPB. Survival tree leaf node membership had greater predictive accuracy (C-index = 0.81, 95%CI = 0.78-0.84 for the eGFR survival tree and C-index = 0.77, 95%CI = 0.71-0.81 for the ACR survival tree) in comparison with that of individual measures of kidney function. Conclusions: physical performance helps to identify a proportion of patients at an increased risk of mortality despite a mild-moderate impairment in kidney function and improves predictive accuracy of individual measures of kidney function. © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved.

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  • 6. Dsouza, Sebestina Anita
    et al.
    Ramachandran, Meena
    Nishiura, Yuko
    Venkatesh, Bhumika Tumkur
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Social Work. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University.
    Assessment of time-related deficits in older adults: a scoping review protocol.2021In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 11, no 9, article id e050521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: People with cognitive impairments often have difficulties in managing their time for daily activities. In older adults with cognitive impairments such as dementia and stroke, these may present as disorientation, poor time awareness, time perception, daily time management and so on. Time-related deficits and associated behaviours impede independent living and add considerably to caregiver strain. Several interventions are being investigated to help people with cognitive impairments orient and navigate time and do their daily activities. The provision of interventions requires the use of sound assessment tools. However, it is not clear how time-related concepts are specifically evaluated in practice, what are the available assessments and how these assessments should be selected.

    METHOD AND ANALYSIS: This protocol follows the Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewer's Manual (2020) for scoping reviews and is registered with the Open Science Framework (https://osf.io/4ptgy/). We will include the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science and PsycINFO. Two reviewers will independently screen eligible studies for inclusion against the selection criteria and then review the full-text of the selected studies. We will extract the bibliographic data, study design and setting, and details of assessments used in the studies to evaluate time-related concepts including format, mode and duration of administration, psychometric properties and so on. The identified assessments will be mapped with regard to time-related concepts being evaluated and described using narrative synthesis.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: As secondary data analysis, ethics approval is not required for this scoping review. We plan to disseminate the results through peer-reviewed journals and conferences targeting health professionals working with older adults.

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  • 7. Formiga, Francesc
    et al.
    Badía-Tejero, Ana María
    Corsonello, Andrea
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    Mattace-Raso, Francesco
    Tap, Lisanne
    Kostka, Tomasz
    Guligowska, Agnieszka
    Moreno-González, Rafael
    Diabetes and factors associated with cognitive and functional decline. The screening for CKD among older people across Europe (SCOPE) study2023In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 35, no 11, p. 2693-2701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in older people is a heterogeneous condition that exhibits differential characteristics in comparison with younger adults. DM increases the risk of disability, is associated with dementia and loss of function, and cognition may often be interrelated and more pronounced in older patients with DM than in those without.

    AIMS: Our aim was to evaluate the incidence of functional and/or cognitive impairment in older adults with and without DM, and its associated factors in DM participants.

    METHODS: A 2-year prospective analysis was conducted in a European multicenter prospective cohort (SCOPE study). Older community-dwelling adults (aged ≥ 75 years) underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. New functional and/or cognitive decline was explored.

    RESULTS: Of 1611 participants, 335 (22.0%) had DM at baseline. The percentage of participants scoring at least one ADL impairment and/or cognitive impairment (MMSE < 24) was similar in both groups (9.6%). Factors associated with any new disability in participants with DM in the multivariate analysis were female sex (OR 3.28, 95% CI 1.42-7.56), history of stroke (OR 4.58, 95% CI 1.64-12.7), and greater IADL dependency (OR 1.08 95% CI 1.02-1.15).

    DISCUSSION: Association between DM and cognitive or functional decline in outpatients of 75 years and older was not found, but factors such as female gender, history of stroke, and IADL dependency could be related.

    CONCLUSION: Decline in functional and cognitive status of community-dwelling older adults with DM was similar to participants without DM in a short period of 2 years of follow-up, though several clinical factors may increase its risk in this population.

  • 8.
    Freiberger, Ellen
    et al.
    Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    Fabbietti, Paolo
    Italian National Research Center on Ageing (IRCCS INRCA), Ancona and Cosenza, Ancona, Italy.
    Corsonello, Andrea
    Italian National Research Center on Ageing (IRCCS INRCA), Ancona and Cosenza, Ancona, Italy; University of Calabria, Rende, Italy.
    Lattanzio, Fabrizia
    Italian National Research Center on Ageing (IRCCS INRCA), Ancona and Cosenza, Ancona, Italy.
    Sieber, Cornel
    Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    Tap, Lisanne
    Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Mattace-Raso, Francesco
    Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge; Region Stockholm, Stockholm.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge; Region Stockholm, Stockholm.
    Roller-Wirnsberger, Regina
    Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Wirnsberger, Gerhard
    Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Moreno-Gonzalez, Rafael
    Bellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELL-L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
    Formiga, Francesc
    Bellvitge University Hospital-IDIBELL-L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
    Martinez, Sara Lainez
    Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
    Gil, Pedro
    Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
    Kostka, Tomasz
    Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.
    Guligowska, Agnieszka
    Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.
    Yehoshua, Ilan
    Recanati School for Community Health Professions at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheba, Israel; Maccabi Healthcare Services, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Melzer, Itshak
    Recanati School for Community Health Professions at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheba, Israel.
    Kob, Robert
    Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    Short physical performance battery is not associated with falls and injurious falls in older persons: longitudinal data of the SCOPE project2024In: European Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 1878-7649, E-ISSN 1878-7657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Falls and fall-related injuries in older persons are a major public health problem. Our objective was to study the predictive value of the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) in the cohort of the SCOPE project on falls, injurious falls, and possible difference of prediction between indoors and outdoors falls.

    METHODS: For this sub-study of the SCOPE project participants reporting no falls at baseline, and survey data on falls at the 12-month and 24-month follow-up were included. Participant´s characteristics were assessed during the baseline interview and medical examinations. Falls as well as injurious falls and fall circumstances were obtained self-reported. SPPB and its association with fallers vs. no fallers at 12 and at 24 months were studied with logistic regression models.

    RESULTS: The 1198 participants had a median age of 79 years (77-82), and a median SPPB of 10 (8-11), with a 52.5% of female. A total of 227 and 277 falls (12- and 24- month visits, respectively) were reported. In the crude model, the SPPB sum scores (p < 0.001) as well as most single item scores were significant different between fallers and non-fallers over time. However, the association was attenuated in models adjusted for age, sex, marital status, number of medications, quality of life, handgrip strength, and muscle mass [e.g., 12 months; OR 0.94 (0.87-1.02)]. While SPPB fails to differentiate between injurious and non-injurious falls (p = 0.48), a lower SPPB score was associated with falls at home (p < 0.01) after 24 months.

    CONCLUSION: SBPP was not able to significantly predict the risk of falling as well as experiencing an injurious fall.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study was registered prospectively on 25th February 2016 at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02691546).

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  • 9.
    Ganda Mall, John-Peter
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Östlund-Lagerström, Lina
    Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre, Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Carl Mårten
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Algilani, Samal
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Rasoal, Dara
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    V. Keita, Åsa
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Are self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms among older adults associated with increased intestinal permeability and psychological distress?2018In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite the substantial number of older adults suffering from gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms little is known regarding the character of these complaints and whether they are associated with an altered intestinal barrier function and psychological distress. Our aim was to explore the relationship between self-reported gut health, intestinal permeability and psychological distress among older adults.

    METHODS: Three study populations were included: 1) older adults with GI symptoms (n = 24), 2) a group of older adults representing the general elderly population in Sweden (n = 22) and 3) senior orienteering athletes as a potential model of healthy ageing (n = 27). Questionnaire data on gut-health, psychological distress and level of physical activity were collected. Intestinal permeability was measured by quantifying zonulin in plasma. The level of systemic and local inflammation was monitored by measuring C-reactive protein (CRP), hydrogen peroxide in plasma and calprotectin in stool samples. The relationship between biomarkers and questionnaire data in the different study populations was illustrated using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA).

    RESULTS: Older adults with GI symptoms displayed significantly higher levels of both zonulin and psychological distress than both general older adults and senior orienteering athletes. The PCA analysis revealed a separation between senior orienteering athletes and older adults with GI symptoms and showed an association between GI symptoms, psychological distress and zonulin.

    CONCLUSIONS: Older adults with GI symptoms express increased plasma levels of zonulin, which might reflect an augmented intestinal permeability. In addition, this group suffer from higher psychological distress compared to general older adults and senior orienteering athletes. This relationship was further confirmed by a PCA plot, which illustrated an association between GI symptoms, psychological distress and intestinal permeability.

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  • 10. K., Porcaro Connie
    et al.
    Clare, Singer
    Boris, Djokic
    Danesh, Ali A.
    Ruth, Tappen
    Engström, Gabriella
    Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton.
    Perceived Voice Disorders in Older Adults and Impact on Social Interactions2021In: Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, ISSN 2381-473X, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    The Divide That Older People Make: Age, Digital Technologies And Meaning Among Older Internet Users2014In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 54, no S2, p. 116-116Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Källberg, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. Falun Hospital and Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun.
    Berg, Lena M
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Skogli, Sara
    Falun Hospital, Falun.
    Bjurbo, Charlotte
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Muntlin, Åsa
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Prevalence of frailty and associated factors in older adults seeking care at Swedish emergency departments2023In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Internationally, prolonged length of stay for older adults in the emergency department (ED) is associated with increased risk of in-hospital adverse events. In Sweden patients 65 years and older account for 35% of emergency visits, and according to consensus from an international expert group, all persons over 70 should be screened for frailty. This is not routinely done in Swedish EDs, and therefore, knowledge about prevalence, characteristics and clinical outcomes associated with frailty is limited.

    AIM: To describe the prevalence of frailty and associated factors in older adults seeking care at Swedish EDs.

    METHODS: The study has a cross-sectional design. Data was collected at three hospital-based EDs, varying in level and size of setting, for one month. Patients age 70 and older presenting at the EDs and agreed to participate were screened for frailty using the FRail Elderly Support researcH group (FRESH) instrument. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics to assess the distribution of patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model the association between frailty and demographic characteristics, and Cox regression was used to model the association between frailty and clinical outcomes.

    RESULTS: A total of 3101 patients were eligible for inclusion; of these, 984 (32%) were included and screened for frailty. Of the final sample, 57.3% were assessed as frail. Characteristics significantly associated with frailty were living in a residential care facility, age (> 80 years), being a woman and arriving with emergency medical service (EMS). There was a significant association between frailty and admittance to in-hospital care.

    CONCLUSION: Our study shows a high prevalence of frailty in older people. Factors associated with frailty were living in a residential care facility, age ≥ 80 years, being a woman and arriving with EMS to the ED and being admitted to in-hospital care. Frailty screening should be incorporated in the triage system to identify frail patients who need tailored interventions. More studies using the FRESH instrument are needed to further confirm our findings and to develop the methods for screening for frailty in the ED.

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  • 13. Lennhed, Björn
    et al.
    Borelius, Charlotta
    Kastemyr, Helen
    Jansson, Lotta
    Olai, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Utvärdering av det regionala vårdprogrammet för personer med demenssjukdom2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Lindqvist, Susanne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå.
    Olai, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Hägglund, Patricia
    Umeå University, Umeå.
    Factors associated with malnutrition among older people in Swedish short-term care: Poor oral health, dysphagia and mortality2024In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between malnutrition and potential contributing factors such as poor oral health, dysphagia and mortality among older people in short-term care.

    METHODS: This cross-sectional study is a part of the multidisciplinary multicentre project SOFIA (Swallowing function, Oral health and Food Intake in old Age), which includes older people (≥65 years) in 36 short-term care units in five regions of Sweden. Nutritional status was measured with version II of the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form (MEONF-II), oral health with the Revised Oral Assessment Guide (ROAG), dysphagia with a water swallow test, and the mortality rate was followed for 1 year. Data were analysed using descriptive analysis and logistic regression models to calculate odds ratios for the association between malnutrition and these factors.

    RESULTS: Among the 391 participants, the median age was 84 years and 53.3% were women. Mortality rate was 25.1% within 1 year in the total group, and was higher among malnourished participants than among their well-nourished counterparts. Severe dysphagia (OR: 6.51, 95% CI: 2.40-17.68), poor oral health (OR: 5.73, 95% CI: 2.33-14.09) and female gender (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.24-3.93) were independently associated with malnutrition.

    CONCLUSION: Mortality rate was higher among malnourished people than those who were well nourished. Severe dysphagia, poor oral health and female gender was predictors of malnutrition among older people in short-term care. These health risks should be given more attention in short-term care with early identification.

  • 15. Mekonnen, Habtamu Sewunet
    et al.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Geda, Biftu
    Azale, Telake
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Satisfaction with life and associated factors among elderly people living in two cities in northwest Ethiopia: a community-based cross-sectional study2022In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 9, article id e061931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective This study aimed to determine the level of life satisfaction and identify associated factors among elderly people living in two cities in northwest Ethiopia. Design Community-based cross-sectional study. Setting Two cities in northwest Ethiopia (Gondar and Bahir Dar). Participants 816 elderly people age 60 years and above living in Gondar and Bahir Dar, northwest Ethiopia. Systematic random sampling was used to select study participants. Main outcome measure Level of life satisfaction. Considering the mean and SD, three levels of satisfaction appeared to suffice as the basis for analysis and discussion: 23.5-34.4 dissatisfied, 34.5-56.5 averagely satisfied and 56.6-67.5 satisfied. Multivariable ordinal regression analysis was done to control the confounders. Since the outcome variable has an ordinal category, ordinal regression analysis is appropriate. A p≤0.05 and AOR (adjusted OR) with a 95% CI were considered to determine the statistically significant variables and strength of the association. Results The mean age of the respondents was 68.2 years with an SD±7.2. The level of life satisfaction was: dissatisfied 17.2%, moderately satisfied 63.8% and well satisfied 19.0%. Overall, 45.8% (95% CI 42.2% to 49.2%) of the participants had a score equal to or above the mean. Regarding associated factors; retired current occupation (AOR=2.23, 95% CI 1.09 to 4.55), good self-rated health status (AOR=2.54, 95% CI 1.29 to 4.99), having no chronic disease (AOR=1.48, 95% CI 1.03 to 2.11), somewhat-good (AOR=2.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 4.13) and good (AOR=4.51, 95% CI 2.40 to 8.45) self-perception on ageing life, moderate functional impairment on daily living activities (AOR=5.43, 95% CI 1.81 to 16.24), high sense of coherence (AOR=3.80, 95% CI 2.04 to 7.08), house rent as a source of finance (AOR=2.60, 95% CI 1.49 to 4.52) and high perceived social support (AOR=2.13, 95% CI 1.44 to 3.16) had statistically significant association with the life satisfaction. Conclusion The life satisfaction level in our study group was lower than in some more highly developed countries. To improve the level of life satisfaction in Ethiopia, a holistic programme of nursing care for elderly people, particularly as concerns about their health and psychosocial conditions is crucial in both community and clinical settings.

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  • 16. Moreno-González, Rafael
    et al.
    Cruzado, Josep Maria
    Corsonello, Andrea
    Fabbietti, Paolo
    Tap, Lisanne
    Mattace-Raso, Francesco
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    Guligowska, Agnieszka
    Formiga, Francesc
    Kidney function and other associated factors of sarcopenia in community-dwelling older adults: The SCOPE study2024In: European journal of internal medicine, ISSN 0953-6205, E-ISSN 1879-0828, Vol. 123, p. 81-93, article id S0953-6205(23)00432-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Sarcopenia is associated with several factors and medical conditions among older adults, though previous research has shown limitations and inconsistencies, especially regarding chronic kidney disease (CKD). We investigated the clinical and laboratory variables associated with sarcopenia and severe sarcopenia in older adults, focusing on kidney function measures.

    METHODS: Data from community-dwelling adults aged ≥75 years participating in the SCOPE multicenter prospective cohort study were assessed cross-sectionally. Comprehensive geriatric assessment was conducted; sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, clinical variables and comorbidities, anthropometric and bioelectrical impedance analysis, blood and urine laboratory variables were collected. EWGSOP2 revised criteria were used to define sarcopenia and its severity. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using creatinine and non-creatinine-based equations, and CKD stages were defined accordingly.

    RESULTS: 1420 participants were included, prevalence of sarcopenia was 10.6 %, and 6 % had severe sarcopenia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age [OR =1.14; 95 %CI (1.09-1.19)], body mass index (BMI) [0.83 (0.79-0.88)], disability performing instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) [2.61 (1.69-4.06)], Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score <24 [2.75 (1.62-4.67)], osteoporosis [2.39 (1.55-3.67)], and stage 4 CKD defined by CKD-EPIBTP-B2M, a non-creatinine-based eGFR equation [2.88 (1.11-7.49)], were independently associated with sarcopenia; as were specifically with severe sarcopenia, with more pronounced associations.

    CONCLUSIONS: In community-dwelling older adults, sarcopenia is a relevant condition and is associated with severe CKD, older age, IADL, cognitive impairments, osteoporosis and low BMI. These factors should be assessed for proper identification and management of older patients with sarcopenia, and even more so with severe sarcopenia.

  • 17.
    Olai, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Region Dalarna, enheten för Utveckling, hälsa och välfärd.
    Rapport Öppna Jämförelser (ÖJ): Vård och omsorg om äldre i Dalarna 20132014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18. Olsson, F.
    et al.
    Halvorsen, K.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science.
    Neuromuscular controller models for quantifying standing balance in older people: A systematic review2023In: IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 1941-1189, E-ISSN 1937-3333 , Vol. 16, p. 560-578Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Ouslander, Joseph G.
    et al.
    Reyes, Bernardo
    Diaz, Sanya
    Engström, Gabriella
    Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida.
    Thirty-Day Hospital Readmissions in a Care Transitions Program for High-Risk Older Adults2020In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 68, no 6, p. 1307-1312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES To describe the causes of 30-day hospital readmissions among high-risk older adults during implementation of a multicomponent care transitions program. DESIGN Secondary analysis of data from the evaluation of a multicomponent care transitions program for hospitalized high-risk older adults. SETTING A 400-bed community teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS Patients aged 75 and older admitted to non?intensive care unit beds who met specific criteria for high risk of complications and hospital readmissions. The intervention group included 202 patients, of whom 37 were readmitted to the hospital as an inpatient or on observation status within 30?days of discharge. MEASUREMENTS Root-cause analyses on each readmission were conducted by hospital physicians and post-acute care (PAC) organization staff. Additional data were collected by trained project staff using the medical record and postdischarge telephone or in-person follow-up visits. These data were reviewed and adjudicated among the authors, and each readmission was rated with unanimous agreement as ?preventable,? ?possibly preventable,? or ?not preventable.? RESULTS No significant differences were found in demographic and clinical characteristics of intervention patients readmitted versus those not readmitted. A higher proportion of the 37 patients who were readmitted did not have a postdischarge visit than the 165 patients who were not readmitted (15 [41%] vs 45 [27%]; P =?.11). Among the 37 readmissions, 14 (38%) were rated as not preventable, 14 (38%) as possibly preventable, and 9 (24%) as preventable. Readmissions were rated as preventable or possibly preventable for a variety of reasons that provide insight into how care transitions programs for high-risk older adults might be made more effective. CONCLUSION Root-cause analyses of hospital readmissions among high-risk older adults by hospital physicians and PAC providers can identify strategies that might enhance the effectiveness of care transitions interventions in this complex population. J Am Geriatr Soc 68:1307?1312, 2020.

  • 20. Ouslander, Joseph G.
    et al.
    Reyes, Bernardo
    Yang, Zhiyou
    Engström, Gabriella
    Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida, USA.
    Tappen, Ruth
    Newman, David
    Huckfeldt, Peter J.
    Nursing home performance in a trial to reduce hospitalizations: Implications for future trials2021In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 2316-2326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Experience in trials of implementing quality improvement (QI) programs in nursing homes (NHs) has been variable. Understanding the characteristics of NHs that demonstrate improvements during these trials is critical to improving NH care. Design Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of implementation of a QI program to reduce hospital transfers. Participants Seventy-one NHs that completed the 12-month trial Intervention Implementation included distance-learning strategies, involvement of a champion, regular submission of data on hospitalizations and root cause analyses of transfers, and training, feedback and support. Measurements Primary outcomes included all-cause and potentially avoidable hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits per 1000 NH resident days, and the percentage of residents readmitted in 30-days. We compared multiple other variables that could influence effective program implementation in NHs in the highest versus lowest quartile of changes in the primary outcomes. Results The 18 high-performing NHs had significant reductions in hospitalization and ED visits, whereas the 18 NHs in the low-performing group had increases. The difference in changes in each outcome varied between a reduction of 0.75 and 2.30 events relative to a NH with a census of 100; the absolute difference in 30-day readmissions was 19%. None of the variables we examined reached significance after adjustment for multiple comparisons between the groups. There was no consistent pattern of differences in nonprofit status, nursing staffing, and quality ratings. Conclusion Our experience and reviews of other NH trials suggest that key factors contributing to successful implementation QI programs in NHs remain unclear. To improve NH care, implementation trials should account for intervention fidelity and factors that have not been examined in detail, such as degree and nature of leadership support, financial and regulatory incentives, quality measures, resident and family perspectives, and the availability of onsite high-quality medical care and support of the medical director.

  • 21. Persson, A. -C
    et al.
    Janeslätt, G.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Social Work. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University.
    Löfgren, M.
    Möller, M.
    Associations between Time Processing Ability, Daily Time Management, and Dementia Severity2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 7, article id 3928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated associations between time processing ability (TPA), daily time management (DTM), and dementia severity. Persons with dementia (PwDs) (n = 53) and their significant others (n = 49) participated in this cross-sectional study. Bivariate analyses were used to investigate associations between TPA and DTM and the dementia severity. Linear regression models were used to further predict the contribution of the subtests in the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) for TPA results. The results showed significant correlations between TPA and dementia severity, where visuospatial functions were the most highly correlated. TPA also showed a significant correlation to proxy-rated DTM. In addition, proxy-rated DTM was significantly correlated with dementia severity and PwDs’ own self-ratings of their DTM. Knowledge of the association between TPA, dementia severity, and visuospatial functions can enable early detection of TPA impairments. For a comprehensive assessment of TPA and DTM, objective measures should be used in combination with self-ratings and proxy-ratings. The findings can be used in clinical research and healthcare settings to develop methods to compensate for impaired TPA and support DTM in PwDs. © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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  • 22. Reyes, Bernardo
    et al.
    Diaz, Sanya
    Engström, Gabriella
    Florida Atlantic University, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Boca Raton, Florida, USA.
    Ouslander, Joseph
    Adherence to care transitions recommendations among high-risk hospitalized older patients2021In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 69, no 6, p. 1638-1645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives Evidence on the effectiveness of inpatient hospital geriatric consultation is scant, and it is unknown whether adherence to specific recommendations will improve care and patient outcomes. This study was conducted to provide insights from a quality improvement project that may help guide further improvements in the effectiveness of these consultations made as a component of a care transitions program (CTP). Design Secondary analysis of the implementation of a multicomponent CTP for high-risk hospitalized patients aged 75 and older. Setting A 400-bed community teaching hospital. Participants Two hundred and two patients admitted to non-ICU beds who met high-risk criteria. Intervention Inpatient comprehensive geriatric consultation including care transition recommendations, telephone and in-person follow-up weekly for 4?weeks after discharge, and collaboration with post-acute organizations and primary care and specialist physicians to implement recommendations. Measurements Primary outcomes for this analysis was 30-day hospital readmissions and adherence to transition of care recommendations. Results The 142 patients with at least one post-discharge visit received 936 care transition recommendations. Overall, 663 (71%) of the 936 care transition recommendations were adhered to (71%). The adherence rate was lower in the 22 patients who were readmitted to the hospital within 30?days (63%) compared to 72% adherence in the 120 patients who were not readmitted. This was not a statistically significant difference, and there were no significant differences in the number and percent adherence in any recommendation category between the two groups. Conclusion We found adherence to just over two-thirds of care transition recommendations, similar to a small number of other studies. We did not find a relationship between the number of recommendations and adherence to them with 30-day readmissions to the hospital. Future studies of CTPs should consider several strategies may enhance geriatric consultation care transitions recommendations and adherence to them, and improve patient outcomes.

  • 23. Sobestiansky, S.
    et al.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Cederholm, T.
    Sarcopenia and malnutrition in relation to mortality in hospitalised patients in geriatric care – predictive validity of updated diagnoses2021In: Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, E-ISSN 2405-4577, Vol. 45, p. 442-448Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 24. Svedin, Frida
    et al.
    Blomberg, Oscar
    Brantnell, Anders
    Farrand, Paul
    von Essen, Louise
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Woodford, Joanne
    Adapting a guided low-intensity behavioural activation intervention for people with dementia and depression in the Swedish healthcare context (INVOLVERA)2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Svedin, Frida
    et al.
    Blomberg, Oscar
    Brantnell, Anders
    Farrand, Paul
    von Essen, Louise
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Woodford, Joanne
    Developing and adapting a guided low-intensity behavioral activation intervention targeting depression in people with dementia for the Swedish context (The INVOLVERA Study)2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26. Svedin, Frida
    et al.
    Brantnell, Anders
    Farrand, Paul
    Blomberg, Oscar
    Coumoundouros, Chelsea
    von Essen, Louise
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Woodford, Joanne
    Adapting a guided low-intensity behavioural activation intervention for people with dementia and depression in the Swedish healthcare context (INVOLVERA): a study protocol using codesign and participatory action research.2021In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 11, no 7, article id e048097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Dementia is a worldwide health concern with incident rates continuing to increase. While depression prevalence is high in people with dementia and psychological interventions such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) are effective, access to psychological interventions remains limited. Reliance on traditional CBT for people with dementia and depression may present difficulties given it is a complex psychological approach, costly to deliver, and professional training time is lengthy. An alternative approach is behavioural activation (BA), a simpler psychological intervention for depression. The present study seeks to work with people with dementia, informal caregivers, community stakeholders, and healthcare professionals, to adapt a guided low-intensity BA intervention for people with dementia and depression, while maximising implementation potential within the Swedish healthcare context.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A mixed methods study using codesign, principles from participatory action research (PAR) and normalisation process theory to facilitate the cultural relevance, appropriateness and implementation potential of the intervention. The study will consist of four iterative PAR phases, using focus groups with healthcare professionals and community stakeholders, and semi-structured interviews with people with dementia and informal caregivers. A content analysis approach will be adopted to analyse the transcribed focus groups and semi-structured interviews recordings.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study will be conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and data handled according to General Data Protection Regulation. Written informed consent will be obtained from all study participants. In accordance with the Swedish Health and Medical Services Act, capacity to consent will be examined by a member of the research team. Ethical approval has been obtained from the Swedish Ethical Review Authority (Dnr: 2020-05542 and Dnr: 2021-00925). Findings will be published in an open access peer-reviewed journal, presented at academic conferences, and disseminated among lay and healthcare professional audiences.

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  • 27.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Aktuell geriatrisk forskning i Uppsala2018In: Svensk geriatrik, ISSN 2001-2047, no 2, p. 9-12Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Larsson, Liss Elin
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare. Uppsala University.
    Berglund, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Tecnologico de Monterrey, Estado de Mexico,Mexico.
    Dual-Task Interference of Gait Parameters During Different Conditions of the Timed Up-and-Go Test Performed by Community-Dwelling Older Adults2023In: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, ISSN 1063-8652, E-ISSN 1543-267X, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 823-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Timed Up-and-Go (TUG) test has been combined with different verbal/cognitive tasks (i.e., TUG dual task [TUGdt]) as a form of motor-cognitive testing. However, it is still unclear how different TUGdt conditions affect gait among older adults. Thirty community-dwelling older adults, with mean age of 73 years, participated in the study. Data were collected using marker-free video recordings. Gait parameters were extracted using a semiautomatic deep learning system. Comparisons of execution time and gait parameter outcomes were made under TUG and three types of TUGdt test conditions: TUGdt-naming animals, TUGdt-months backwards, and TUGdt-serial 7s. Statistical analyses were based on mean values of the gait parameters for each participant and TUG condition, including TUGdt gait cost, that is, the relative difference between TUGdt and TUG. All the investigated TUGdt conditions resulted in varying degrees of gait parameter changes. Under TUGdt conditions, participants took shorter and slower steps, with TUGdt-serial 7s causing the largest interference.

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  • 29.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Rosberg Petersson, Johanna
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Care Sciences. Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare. Uppsala University.
    McKee, Kevin J
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Social Work.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå University.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Estado de Mexico, Mexico.
    Berglund, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Prediction of conversion to dementia disorders based on timed up and go dual-task test verbal and motor outcomes: a five-year prospective memory-clinic-based study2023In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: While assessment tools can increase the detection of cognitive impairment, there is currently insufficient evidence regarding clinical outcomes based on screening for cognitive impairment in older adults.

    METHODS: The study purpose was to investigate whether Timed Up and Go dual-task test (TUGdt) results, based on TUG combined with two different verbal tasks (name different animals, TUGdt-NA, and recite months in reverse order, TUGdt-MB), predicted dementia incidence over a period of five years among patients (N = 186, mean = 70.7 years; 45.7% female) diagnosed with Subjective Cognitive Impairment (SCI) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) following assessment at two memory clinics. Associations between TUG parameters and dementia incidence were examined in Cox regression models.

    RESULTS: During follow-up time (median (range) 3.7 (0.1-6.1) years) 98 participants converted to dementia. Novel findings indicated that the TUGdt parameter words/time, after adjustment for age, gender, and education, can be used for the prediction of conversion to dementia in participants with SCI or MCI over a period of five years. Among the TUG-related parameters investigated, words/time showed the best predictive capacity, while time scores of TUG and TUGdt as well as TUGdt cost did not produce significant predictive results. Results further showed that the step parameter step length during TUGdt predicts conversion to dementia before adjustment for age, gender, and education. Optimal TUGdt cutoffs for predicting dementia at 2- and 4-year follow-up based on words/time were calculated. The sensitivity of the TUGdt cutoffs was high at 2-year follow-up: TUGdt-NA words/time, 0.79; TUGdt-MB words/time, 0.71; reducing respectively to 0.64 and 0.65 at 4-year follow-up.

    CONCLUSIONS: TUGdt words/time parameters have potential as cost-efficient tools for conversion-to-dementia risk assessment, useful for research and clinical purposes. These parameters may be able to bridge the gap of insufficient evidence for such clinical outcomes.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT05893524: https://www.

    CLINICALTRIALS: gov/study/NCT05893524?id=NCT05893524&rank=1 .

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  • 30. Åhman, Hanna B
    et al.
    Berglund, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Cedervall, Ylva
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Social Work.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Timed "Up & Go" Dual-Task Tests: Age- and Sex-Specific Reference Values and Test-Retest Reliability in Cognitively Healthy Controls.2021In: Physical Therapy, ISSN 0031-9023, E-ISSN 1538-6724, Vol. 101, no 10, article id pzab179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To establish reference values for the Uppsala-Dalarna Dementia and Gait (UDDGait) Timed "Up & Go" dual-task (TUGdt) test variables in cognitively healthy adults and to assess these variables' test-retest reliability.

    METHODS: For reference values, 166 participants were recruited with approximately equal numbers and proportions of women and men in the age groups 50 to 59, 60 to 69, 70 to 79, and 80+ (mean age = 70 years, age range = 50-91 years, 51% women). For reliability testing, 43 individuals (mean age = 69 years, age range = 50-89 years, 51% women) were recruited. Two dual-task tests were carried out: TUGdt naming animals and TUGdt months backward, representing 8 test variables: time scores, costs (the relative difference between single- and dual-task time scores), "number of animals", "number of months", "animals/10 s", and "months/10 s". Reference ranges for the variables were established by quantile regression in age- and sex-specific groups. For reliability, ICCs, standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change, and Bland-Altman plots were used.

    RESULTS: Reference values for the TUGdt test variables are presented for the 2.5th and 97.5th percentile. The reliability of TUGdt time scores was excellent (ICCs between 0.85 and 0.86). "Number of animals" and "animals/10 s" as well as "months/10 s" showed fair to good levels of reliability (ICCs between 0.45 and 0.58), whereas the reliability for both cost measures and "number of months" was poor (ICCs between 0.34 and 0.39).

    CONCLUSIONS: Normative reference values, potentially useful for clinical and research purposes, were presented in 4 age- and sex-specific groups from 50 years and above. Reliability for the test variables varied between poor and excellent, the lower estimates partly explained by some variables being the ratio of 2 other variables. In UDDGait, TUGdt tests are intended for diagnostic and predictive purposes, for which these tests are promising and require further investigations.

    IMPACT: We present normative reference values and test-retest reliability results for the UDDGait TUGdt test variables. These results should be useful for both clinical and research purposes.

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  • 31. Åhman, Hanna B
    et al.
    Cedervall, Ylva
    Kilander, Lena
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Berglund, Lars
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Dual-task tests discriminate between dementia, mild cognitive impairment, subjective cognitive impairment, and healthy controls: a cross-sectional cohort study2020In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Discrimination between early-stage dementia and other cognitive impairment diagnoses is central to enable appropriate interventions. Previous studies indicate that dual-task testing may be useful in such differentiation. The objective of this study was to investigate whether dual-task test outcomes discriminate between groups of individuals with dementia disorder, mild cognitive impairment, subjective cognitive impairment, and healthy controls.

    METHODS: A total of 464 individuals (mean age 71 years, 47% women) were included in the study, of which 298 were patients undergoing memory assessment and 166 were cognitively healthy controls. Patients were grouped according to the diagnosis received: dementia disorder, mild cognitive impairment, or subjective cognitive impairment. Data collection included participants' demographic characteristics. The patients' cognitive test results and diagnoses were collected from their medical records. Healthy controls underwent the same cognitive tests as the patients. The mobility test Timed Up-and-Go (TUG single-task) and two dual-task tests including TUG (TUGdt) were carried out: TUGdt naming animals and TUGdt months backwards. The outcomes registered were: time scores for TUG single-task and both TUGdt tests, TUGdt costs (relative time difference between TUG single-task and TUGdt), number of different animals named, number of months recited in correct order, number of animals per 10 s, and number of months per 10 s. Logistic regression models examined associations between TUG outcomes pairwise between groups.

    RESULTS: The TUGdt outcomes "animals/10 s" and "months/10 s" discriminated significantly (p < 0.001) between individuals with an early-stage dementia diagnosis, mild cognitive impairment, subjective cognitive impairment, and healthy controls. The TUGdt outcome "animals/10 s" showed an odds ratio of 3.3 (95% confidence interval 2.0-5.4) for the groups dementia disorders vs. mild cognitive impairment. TUGdt cost outcomes, however, did not discriminate between any of the groups.

    CONCLUSIONS: The novel TUGdt outcomes "words per time unit", i.e. "animals/10 s" and "months/10 s", demonstrate high levels of discrimination between all investigated groups. Thus, the TUGdt tests in the current study could be useful as complementary tools in diagnostic assessments. Future studies will be focused on the predictive value of TUGdt outcomes concerning dementia risk for individuals with mild cognitive impairment or subjective cognitive impairment.

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  • 32. Åhman, Hanna Bozkurt
    et al.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Cedervall, Ylva
    Lennhed, Björn
    Berglund, Lars
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kilander, Lena
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Dual-task performance and neurodegeneration: Correlations between timed up-and-go dual-task test outcomes and Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers2019In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 71, no Suppl 1, p. S75-S83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Tools to identify individuals at preclinical stages of dementia disorders are needed to enable early interventions. Alterations in dual-task performance have been detected early in progressive neurodegenerative disorders. Hence, dual-task testing may have the potential to screen for cognitive impairment caused by neurodegeneration. Exploring correlations between dual-task performance and biomarkers of neurodegeneration is therefore of interest.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate correlations between Timed Up-and-Go dual-task (TUGdt) outcomes and Alzheimer's disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid-β 42 (Aβ42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau).

    METHODS: This cross-sectional cohort study included 90 participants (age range 49-84 years) undergoing memory assessment, who were subsequently diagnosed with AD, other dementia disorders, mild cognitive impairment, or subjective cognitive impairment. TUG combined with "Naming Animals" (TUGdt NA) and "Months Backwards" (TUGdt MB), respectively, were used to assess dual-task performance. The number of correct words and time taken to complete the tests were measured. The CSF biomarkers were analysed by ELISA. Spearman's rank correlation was used for analyses between TUGdt outcomes (TUGdt NA and TUGdt MB), and CSF biomarkers, adjusted for age, gender, and educational level.

    RESULTS: The number of correct words, as well as the number of correct words/10 s during TUGdt NA correlated negatively to CSF t-tau and p-tau. No correlations were found between any time scores and CSF biomarkers.

    CONCLUSION: The correlations between TUGdt NA and t-tau and p-tau may indicate that neurodegeneration affects dual-task performance. Longitudinal studies are needed to further explore dual-task testing in screening for cognitive impairment due to neurodegeneration.

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